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Gold Coast father-of-three becomes first Australian to reach Antarctica’s ‘pole of inaccessibility’

‘Nobody’s ever done this journey’: Father-of-three becomes the first Australian to reach Antarctica’s ‘pole of inaccessibility’ after 23-day trek

  • Geoff Wilson is making his way across the most isolated parts of Antarctica
  • He reached the reached the furthest point on the Antarctic Plateau on Sunday
  • Gold Coast father-of-three became the first Australian to step foot in the area 

Geoff Wilson, 49, (pictured) reached the furthest point on the Antarctic Plateau from the Southern Ocean on Sunday after 23 days battling through treacherous conditions

A Gold Coast father-of-three has become the first Australian to step foot on Antarctica’s ‘pole of inaccessibility’.

Geoff Wilson, 49, reached the furthest point on the Antarctic Plateau from the Southern Ocean on Sunday after 23 days battling through treacherous conditions.

Mr Wilson, a veterinarian by trade, is trying to break the world record for the longest solo, unsupported crossing of Antarctica.

He began the 5,800km adventure in November, armed with two sleds weighing 200 kilograms. 

He has been using kites to push his way through ice and snow during the the three-month trek. 

The first leg of his journey has been brutal, he said, with semi-blizzard conditions adding to the challenge. 

Once he finally made it to the first major milestone he said he felt absolute relief. 

Geoff Wilson (pictured) is undertaking the challenge to raise money for the breast cancer charity the McGrath Foundation

Geoff Wilson (pictured) is undertaking the challenge to raise money for the breast cancer charity the McGrath Foundation

‘I dropped the kite, fell to my knees and gave thanks that I’d made it,’ he shared on his blog.  

‘I would say the past 1665km was the most brutal journey I’ve undertaken to date. The cold, the isolation, the relentless sastrugi and continual difficult wind angles have made me earn every painstaking meter of progress.

‘I have pushed hard with no break for 23 days. I knew for the Expedition to be a success, I needed a strong first leg. Despite tough conditions, 23 days is a ridiculous time to make it to the very heart of the ice continent.’

During the past 23 days he has battled the intense cold as well as isolation.

Mr Wilson has two sleds weighing 200kgs,

Mr Wilson (pictured) has two sleds weighing 200kilograms, sleeping bags, a tent, two stoves and electronic gear to communicate with his family back home 

The 'pole of inaccessibility' (pictured) is at the furthest point from the Southern Ocean, where temperatures reach about -58.2C

The ‘pole of inaccessibility’ (pictured) is at the furthest point from the Southern Ocean, where temperatures reach about -58.2C

‘The weight of isolation, silence, white vastness, the ever pervading cold can start to erode your mental state – “the wolves” of fear and loneliness (who only get bigger if you feed them) are extreme at times.’

The next part of his trip will see him climb Dome Argus – the coldest naturally occurring place on the planet.

‘Nobody’s ever done this journey so there’s a lot of unknowns. We don’t know how much crevassing I’ll encounter — there could be a lot of challenges,’ he told the ABC.

Mr Wilson is undertaking the challenge to raise money for the breast cancer charity the McGrath Foundation.

He spent months training on the sand in the Gold Coast and in commercial freezers.    

Mr Wilson, a veterinarian by trade, is trying to break the world record for the longest solo, unsupported crossing of Antarctica

Mr Wilson, a veterinarian by trade, is trying to break the world record for the longest solo, unsupported crossing of Antarctica



Read more at DailyMail.co.uk


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