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Great-great-grandson of Titanic victim sees the sunken staterooms where his relative drowned

Great-great-grandson of Titanic victim Benjamin Guggenheim sees staterooms 12,500ft down where his mining tycoon ancestor drowned after donning evening dress ‘to go down like a gentleman’

  • Benjamin Guggenheim, 46, was last seen sipping brandy on the sinking ship
  • Ancestor Sindbad Rumney-Guggenheim viewed the wreck through a laptop
  • Moment was filmed for National Geographic documentary Back To The Titanic 

A millionaire who went down with the Titanic wearing his evening dress has had his sunken apartments viewed by his great-great-grandson. 

Benjamin Guggenheim, 46, was last seen lounging in a deckchair with his valet Victor Giglio drinking brandy and smoking cigars as the ship sunk.

And now his ancestor Sindbad Rumney-Guggenheim has retraced the American mining tycoon’s haunting last moments by seeing his sunken staterooms through an underwater camera for National Geographic TV series Back To The Titanic which airs this week.

Benjamin Guggenheim, 46, was last seen sipping brandy and smoking cigars next to the Titanic’s grand staircase as the ship sunk

His great-great-grandson Sindbad Rumney-Guggenheim (pictured) returned to the wreck and viewed his ancestor's staterooms through an underwater 4K camera

His great-great-grandson Sindbad Rumney-Guggenheim (pictured) returned to the wreck and viewed his ancestor’s staterooms through an underwater 4K camera

Mr Rumney-Guggenheim said seeing the rooms about 12,500 feet beneath the waves was ‘traumatising’.

‘We all like to remember the tales of him dressed in his best and sipping brandy, and then going down heroically,’ he said, reports the Sunday Express. ‘But what I’m seeing here, with the crushed metal and everything, is the reality.’

‘That chaos is the most traumatising for me. When you’re there and now you see this, it’s just very powerful.’

The millionaire had boarded the Titanic as it made a stopover in Cherbourg, France, before crossing the Atlantic ocean to New York.

He was travelling with his mistress, French singer Leontine Aubart, his valet Mr Giglio, his chauffeur Rene Pemot and Ms Aubart’s maid Emma Sagesser.

The Titanic floundered with the loss of more than 1,500 lives in April 1912

The Titanic floundered with the loss of more than 1,500 lives in April 1912

Pictured above is the Titanic leaving Southampton, England, on her first and only voyage

Pictured above is the Titanic leaving Southampton, England, on her first and only voyage

Ms Aubert and her maid were put on a lifeboat after the ship slammed into an iceberg on 14 April 1912, but the rest of the party stayed behind.

Mr Guggenheim initially put on a lifebelt and headed to the boat deck, before quickly returning to his cabin to change into his best evening wear.

‘We’ve dressed up in our best and are prepared to go down like gentlemen,’ he reportedly said. 

He also reportedly wrote a final message for his wife, which said: ‘If anything should happen to me, tell my wife I’ve done my best in doing my duty.’

The grand staircase on Titanic where Mr Guggenheim is said to have spent his last moments

The grand staircase on Titanic where Mr Guggenheim is said to have spent his last moments

The ship, now 12,500 feet beneath the waves, is rusting away due to exposure to the water

The ship, now 12,500 feet beneath the waves, is rusting away due to exposure to the water

A recent visit found that the captain's bath, pictured above, is now missing from the wreckage

A recent visit found that the captain’s bath, pictured above, is now missing from the wreckage

His staterooms, B84, were torn off from the main section of the ship as it sunk before eventually coming to rest far from the main shipwreck.

The documentary filmmakers, sent 4K cameras to the ship and allowed Mr Rumney-Guggenheim to view his ancestor’s accommodation through a laptop.

More than 1,500 people died when the ‘unsinkable’ vessel disappeared beneath the waves during its maiden voyage. 

Read more at DailyMail.co.uk