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Hadashah Sa’Adat Khan: Melbourne Islamic State recruiter to be freed back into society

A terrorist-sympathising woman who tried to recruit extremists to join Islamic State and exchanged intense letters with her lover – Momena Shoma, known as the ‘tiny terrorist’ – will be released from jail this week. 

Hadashah Sa’Adat Khan tried to recruit an American teenager to join the terrorist organisation when she was 18.

In June this year she was jailed for two-and-a-half years, but most of the sentence had already been served.

A court in 2021 heard Khan exchanged steamy jailhouse letters with Shoma, who is known as the ‘tiny terrorist’, is serving decades in prison and even tried to stab another inmate.

‘I love you to infinity and beyond, I think about you all the time,’ the court heard she wrote in a letter to Shoma.

Hadashah Sa’Adat Khan, who tried to recruit extremists to join Islamic State and exchanged intense letters with her gay lover – Momena Shoma (pictured), known as the ‘tiny terrorist’ – will be released from jail this week

‘I love you to infinity and beyond, I think about you all the time,’ the court heard Khan wrote in a letter to Shoma (pictured: a mock-up of the letters)

The accused terror supporter also referred to Shoma’s jail sentence when she allegedly wrote: ‘I cried for you more than myself.’

Shoma, 27, was jailed in 2019 for at least 31 years after she plunged a knife 3cm into her homestay host Roger Singaravelu’s neck while he slept alongside his five-year-old daughter in Melbourne on February 9, 2018.

Shoma, who shouted ‘Allahu Akbar’ – meaning ‘God is great’ – during the stabbing, later told officers she travelled to Australia with ambitions of attacking somebody in the name of ISIS.

On October 30, 2020, police were called to the Dame Phyllis Frost Centre in Ravenhall after Shoma stabbed a prisoner in the hand with garden secateurs.

Shoma (pictured outside court in 2019) told police she had practised the attack by stabbing a pillow while staying with a different family

Shoma (pictured outside court in 2019) told police she had practised the attack by stabbing a pillow while staying with a different family

In the letters, Khan also allegedly wrote, ‘two years ago I was reading about you in the news, next thing, glory to God, I’m in the same unit as you,’ according to news.com.au.

The court also heard she said: ‘I say this from the depths of my heart, what a great blessing to have (you) who will pull me aside and tell me if I am disobeying Allah.’

It is understood Shoma replied: ‘Young and passionate Muslims who are willing to surrender to the will of our maker.’

‘May Allah make a way out for us all and grant us an imminent victory,’ she wrote.

‘May He guide, protect and honour our mujahideen.’

Sa’Adat Khan will be released on Friday on an interim supervision order with conditions on her home address, phone and internet use.

The order includes 17 conditions, with sub-conditions, requiring her to work with a case manager, undergo psychological assessment and treatment, and a disengagement assessment and program.

She will also be provided with a mobile phone, and have access to computers, tablets and other devices restricted.

Access to the internet, computer programs, social media platforms and landline telephones are also subject to conditions.

Sa’Adat Khan must also live at a specified address in Hallam.

Justice John Dixon did not detail specifics of his order in a Victorian Supreme Court hearing on Thursday afternoon.

He expects his full reasons for granting the interim order, which expires on September 22, will be published next week.

An application for an extended supervision order, which would last three years, has been adjourned until September.

Sa’Adat Khan’s offending was found to be at the lower end of the spectrum.

A bloody chair was pictured outside the home immediately after the brutal attack in 2018

A bloody chair was pictured outside the home immediately after the brutal attack in 2018

In his sentence, Judge Maidment said an American man was already radicalised when she began communicating with him and others online between 2014 and 2016.

She described the man and others she met online as being being nice and giving advice.

‘They said they loved me,’ she said.

Judge Maidment said she found comfort and a sense of purpose in online relationships which encouraged her support of extremist jihad ideology.

The tenor of her communications demonstrated a level of immaturity and eagerness to impress, he found.

But he added it was always very serious when a person dabbles in terrorist activity, and needed to be denounced.

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Read more at DailyMail.co.uk