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Haringey Council leader Claire Kober quits over Momentum

The leader of Haringey Council has sensationally quit – blaming her decision on the ‘sexism, bullying and undemocratic behaviour’ of Momentum activists.

Claire Kober said she will step down in May after her local Labour group was ripped apart by an influx of Corbynistas.

Ms Kober, who has spent 10 years leading the north London authority, said she has faced a volley of personal attacks and cannot put up with it any longer.

Her decision comes after the Labour National Executive Committee – which is now dominated by Momentum – took the rare decision to tell the Labour-run council to halt a controversial private partnership housing scheme.

The move  sparked a furious backlash from Labour councillors across the country who wrote a letter rebuking the party’s ruling body for interfering in local democracy.

Claire Kober said she will step down in May after her local Labour group was ripped apart by an influx of Corbynistas (file pic)

Announcing her decision in the Evening Standard today, she said: ‘The sexism, bullying, undemocratic behaviour and outright personal attacks on me as the most senior woman in Labour in Labour local government have left me disappointed and disillusioned.’ 

Ms Kober warned Mr Corbyn that ‘ideological dogma’ of many of his supporters will do little to improve the lives of ordinary people.

What is the Haringey development vehicle (HDV) and why is it so controversial?

Labour-run Haringey council has been embroiled in a bitter battle over its controversial plans to join forces with the private sector to build more housing in the borough.

Labour councillors had backed the so-called Haringey Development Vehicle (HDV), a £2billion plan to transfer council assets and land into a 50 50 partnership with private developer Lendlease.

The council said the plan was the only way to build badly-needed new housing in the borough.

It said the plan would create 6,400 new homes, thousands of jobs, a new school, health centre and library. 

Councillors pointed out that there are more than 9,000 people on the council list and over 3,000  in temporary accommodation. 

But critics have slammed the plan which they say amounts to ‘social cleansing’. 

Ms Kober’s departure comes after over a dozen other Labour councillors quit or were deselected.

Haringey is expected to become the first Momentum-run Labour council after local elections in May.  

 

And she hit out at Labour NEC for flouting convention to interfere in how locally elected councillors run their authorities .

She said the decision was ‘legally dubious’ and ‘democratically unsound’.

The Labour-run authority has been plunged into crisis after Momentum activists swept in and have mounted an outspoken campaign against a redevelopment 

The labour-run authority had given the green light to £2billion project to convert the old town hall in Crouch End into new housing .

But local  Corbynistas have objected to the plan saying it amounts to ‘social cleansing’ and demanding more social housing.  

Mr Corbyn suggested at conference last year that public-private housing schemes would be impossible under a future Labour government.

In an open letter announcing her resignation, Ms Kober said she hopes left-wing activists who are expected to seize control of the authority in the MA y elections, will come to the redevelopment scheme with an open mind.

She wrote: ‘Ideological dogma will do nothing to improve their lives; only a determination to find practical solutions – in partnership with other sectors – offers them any realistic prospect of a better, more secure future.

‘For me the responsibility of political office is to work to improve people’s lives even when that means finding solutions that aren’t always an ideologically comfortable fit.

‘Political issues are rarely binary, solutions are not simply good or bad. Political leadership is about setting a vision and working to deliver on it using whatever tools are available.

‘That is how we deliver improved outcomes for the communities that seek to gain most from Labour in government, be that local or national.’

Calire Kober warned Jeremy Corbyn (pictured on Sunday) that 'ideological dogma' of many of his supporters will do little to improve the lives of ordinary people

Calire Kober warned Jeremy Corbyn (pictured on Sunday) that ‘ideological dogma’ of many of his supporters will do little to improve the lives of ordinary people



Read more at DailyMail.co.uk


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