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Hong Kong policemen accused of torturing 60-year-old suspect in private

Two Hong Kong police officers have been accused of torturing and abusing an elderly man after detaining him for drunken behaviour.

The two constables repeatedly beat the 62-year-old suspect in the head, abdomen and genitals while he was bound to a bed in a hospital ward, the victim’s son claimed.

The pair were arrested and suspended today, said a spokesperson from Hong Kong police who vowed to investigate the case with ‘absolute impartiality’.

The case is not related to the city’s anti-government demonstrations which have lasted for 11 weeks. 

Two Hong Kong police officers have been accused of beating a 62-year-old man while he was bound to a hospital bed after being detained on June 25. The officers have been arrested

The incident came to light after footage of the alleged abuse was released by the victim’s son at a press conference today. 

It was said to take place in North District Hospital in Sheung Shui in the wee hours of June 26.

The victim, known by his surname Chung, had been arrested the night before after getting into an argument with other people under the influence of alcohol, according to Lam Cheuk-ting, a Hong Kong lawmaker who organised the press conference.

Chung had detained on suspicion of assaulting police officers, it is said.  

Lam alleged that after Chung was taken to a separate ward at the hospital’s ER, the two officers ‘tortured and abused him privately and nonstop’, according to The Stand News.

Footage of the incident was released to the press by the victim's son at a press conference. The eight-minute clip shows the officers beating the man in the head, abdomen and genitals

Footage of the incident was released to the press by the victim’s son at a press conference. The eight-minute clip shows the officers beating the man in the head, abdomen and genitals

Hong Kong police today said they would investigate the case with absolute impartiality

Hong Kong police today said they would investigate the case with absolute impartiality

Lam claimed that the officers repeatedly slapped the victim in the face, bent his wrists and beat his privates with their hands and batons. 

The duo were also accused of stripping Chung’s trousers and underpants off him and poke his privates with their batons. 

It was also said that Chung was so frightened at one point he urinated while lying in the bed. The policemen then allegedly took a piece of clothing soaked with Chung’s urine and used it to muffle his mouth to punish him. 

The officers also pulled Chung’s hair, pressed his eyes and flashed strong light beans into his eyes, the CCTV footage shows.

Today's press conference was organised by Lam Cheuk-ting (far right), a Hong Kong lawmaker. Mr Law is seen protesting against police brutality with other activists on August 12

Today’s press conference was organised by Lam Cheuk-ting (far right), a Hong Kong lawmaker. Mr Law is seen protesting against police brutality with other activists on August 12

Speaking to the press, Chung’s son said his father yelled ‘black cops’ during the alleged abuse and one policeman replied to the man ‘this is what black cops do’. 

Lawmaker Lam condemned the policemen’s behaviour: ‘[They] completely violated the discipline of the police forces and did not respect the law. [They] abused, beat and threatened [the suspect] at will. What police are they?’

Hong Kong police said today that the two officers had been arrested on suspicion of assault occasioning actual bodily harm and would be suspended from their positions.

Hundreds of thousands of protesters rallied peacefully in torrential rain in Hong Kong on Sunday (pictured) in the eleventh week of what have been often violent demonstrations

Hundreds of thousands of protesters rallied peacefully in torrential rain in Hong Kong on Sunday (pictured) in the eleventh week of what have been often violent demonstrations

'I sincerely hope that this was the beginning of society returning to peace and staying away from violence,' said Chief Executive Carrie Lam (pictured at a press conference today)

‘I sincerely hope that this was the beginning of society returning to peace and staying away from violence,’ said Chief Executive Carrie Lam (pictured at a press conference today)

At a press conference, the police said they had been informed of the matter at the end of June, but had not been aware of the existence of surveillance footage until today.  

Chief Superintendent John Tse Chun-chung, head of the Hong Kong police public relations bureau, was quoted by HK01.com saying: ‘The police team will never tolerate those who know the law but break the law, and will investigate the case fairly and with absolute impartiality.’  

The case is under investigation by the Regional Crime Unit of the city’s New Territories South Regional Police. 

Hong Kong police have been criticised for using increasingly aggressive tactics to break up demonstrations. Pictured, one officer fires tear gas at a rally in Sham Shui Po on August 14

Hong Kong police have been criticised for using increasingly aggressive tactics to break up demonstrations. Pictured, one officer fires tear gas at a rally in Sham Shui Po on August 14

Chief Executive Lam said the police watchdog had set up a task force to investigate complaints

Chief Executive Lam said the police watchdog had set up a task force to investigate complaints

Senior Superintendent David Jordan, a British officer serving in Hong Kong police, defended the city's anti-riot team. Pro-democracy protesters are seen shielding themselves with umbrellas in tear gas as they clash with police in Hong Kong on July 28

Senior Superintendent David Jordan, a British officer serving in Hong Kong police, defended the city’s anti-riot team. Pro-democracy protesters are seen shielding themselves with umbrellas in tear gas as they clash with police in Hong Kong on July 28

A protester (left) holds a sign and another (right) covers her eye to show solidarity with a woman who suffered an eye injury after she had allegedly been shot by anti-riot police

A protester (left) holds a sign and another (right) covers her eye to show solidarity with a woman who suffered an eye injury after she had allegedly been shot by anti-riot police

Hong Kong police have been criticised for using increasingly aggressive tactics to break up demonstrations which have been going on for 11 weeks and left the city in turmoil. 

Chung’s case is separate from the mass rallies, which were sparked by a now suspended law bill that would allow people to be extradited from the city to stand trial in mainland China.  

More than 700 people have been arrested in the protests since June.

The city’s anti-riot police officers have been condemned for firing tear gas and rubber bullets at activists at close range. 

One female protester could lose one eye after being hit with a bean bag round in the face by police during a clash earlier this month, it was reported.

Last week, United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights Michelle Bachelet urged Hong Hong authorities to exercise restraint and investigate evidence of its forces firing tear gas at protesters in ways banned by international law. 

Hong Kong’s Chief Executive Carrie Lam said today the police watchdog had set up a task force to investigate complaints.

Senior British police officer in Hong Kong defends his team’s crackdown

In an interview with state broadcaster CCTV, Hong Kong Senior Superintendent David Jordan (pictured during a mission on July 27) said he and his colleagues had been 'incredibly restrained' given the violent that had been given against them

In an interview with state broadcaster CCTV, Hong Kong Senior Superintendent David Jordan (pictured during a mission on July 27) said he and his colleagues had been ‘incredibly restrained’ given the violent that had been given against them

Senior Superintendent David Jordan, a British officer serving in Hong Kong police, defended the city’s anti-riot team to Chinese state media yesterday. 

In an interview with state broadcaster CCTV, the 52-year-old policeman said he and his colleagues had been ‘incredibly restrained’ given the violent that had been given against them. 

He added: ‘We will allow a certain number of disruption to major roads before we deploy. And that is an incredible amount of tolerance for an international city police force.

‘For the Hong Kong police as a whole, probably it is the most challenge we’ve been through in the recent history. Or I can do is just act in good faith, trying to achieve the mission and the security and the stability that we want to achieve as police officers.’

The Senior Superintendent also said it was ‘unacceptable’ for some people to target because of his role in the police.   

Read more at DailyMail.co.uk


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