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How striking teachers ALREADY earn more than $100,000 a year and their pay IS increasing

Striking teachers ALREADY earn more than $100,000 a year and their pay IS increasing faster than other workers… but they STILL want a pay rise

  • Teachers have gone on strike in NSW in dispute over pay and staff shortages
  • Newly-qualified teacher though makes $12,000 more than a graduate lawyer
  • Education Department data shows a teacher near top of scale makes $107,779
  • Increase of 6.9 per cent in past 10 years; private sector only rose by 4.6 per cent


Classroom teachers have gone on strike despite making as much as $107,000 a year and seeing their salaries increase faster than private-sector workers.

Public school teachers across NSW walked off the job on Tuesday as part of a campaign to increase their pay by at least five per cent over the next two years.

However, government data shows that a newly-qualified teacher in the state’s public school system makes $72,260, amounting to $12,000 more than a graduate lawyer. 

Meanwhile, the average graduate accountant makes only $47,000. 

Classroom teachers have gone on strike despite making as much as $107,000 a year and seeing their wages rise faster than private sector workers. Pictured are thousands of teachers marching on Macquarie Street in the Sydney CBD

Thousands of teachers across NSW are taking part in a 24-hour strike to protest about pay and staff shortages. A  newly-qualified teacher in the state's public school system makes $72,263 - $12,000 more than a graduate lawyer

Thousands of teachers across NSW are taking part in a 24-hour strike to protest about pay and staff shortages. A  newly-qualified teacher in the state’s public school system makes $72,263 – $12,000 more than a graduate lawyer

HOW MUCH NSW’S TEACHERS MAKE A YEAR

 Classroom teachers

Band 1 (Graduate) – $72,263

Band 2 (Proficient) – $87,157

Band 2.1 – $94,601

Band 2.2 – $98,330

Band 2.3 – $107,779

Band 3 – $114,720 

 

Principals

Teaching Principal (TP1) $124,038

Teaching Principal (TP2) $144,822

P1 $148,796

P2 $160,154 

P3 $177,481

P4 $185,242

P5 $190,921

 

 

A teacher near the top of the pay scale makes $107,779. That’s more than 6.9 per cent more – or $23,000 more than they did 10 years ago. By comparison, average wages in the private sector rose by only 4.6 per cent. 

However, NSW Teachers Federation president Angelo Gavrielatos said teachers’ salaries were still falling compared to other professions, and that their workload is ‘unmanageable’.

‘Unfortunately, the only action the NSW government is prepared to take is legal action to try and stop teachers and principals protesting over salaries and workloads,’ he told The Daily Telegraph.

‘The workloads of teachers are unmanageable and the government’s 10-year wages cap means the salary they earn doesn’t reflect the skills or responsibilities they have.’ 

The state’s teachers last staged a mass strike in 2011 alongside nurses and police.

The state's teachers last staged a mass strike in 2011 alongside nurses and police. This time they are walking out alongside bus and train drivers

The state’s teachers last staged a mass strike in 2011 alongside nurses and police. This time they are walking out alongside bus and train drivers

Students return to school at Fairvale High School in Sydney as the city emerges from lockdown

Students return to school at Fairvale High School in Sydney as the city emerges from lockdown

This time they are joined by bus and train drivers, who are walking off the job over pay, conditions and privatisation.

Tuesday marks the second day of strikes for public transport workers. 

On Monday, 1,200 bus drivers in Sydney’s inner west went on strike and stopped work for 24 hours. 

Their unions are calling on the state government to demand its contractor Transit Systems negotiate over a two-tier wage system that has some workers earning less than others for doing the same job. 

The strikes will cause further chaos on Tuesday with buses in the city’s southwest from Parramatta and Liverpool to stop services.

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Read more at DailyMail.co.uk