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Huawei mocks Australia’s 5G mobile rollout ban arguing it won’t address national security issues

Huawei MOCKS Australia’s ban on using it’s 5G network – with a chilling warning using a rival with weaken national security because the Beijing-backed from is one step ahead

  • Huawei mocked Australia’s ban on Chinese telco installing next-generation 5G
  • Its local technology boss said Huawei was now more advanced with 6G mobile
  • David Soldani argued 5G ban would therefore fail to address national security 

Huawei has mocked Australia’s ban on the Chinese telecommunications giant installing the 5G mobile network arguing this will compromise national security.

The world’s biggest telecommunications equipment company was prohibited in 2012 from installing the National Broadband Network over cyber spying fears.

A year ago, the Australian government announced Huawei would also be banned from installing next-generation 5G mobile, to the chagrin of Australia’s biggest trading partner, China. 

Huawei has mocked Australia’s ban on the Chinese telecommunications giant installing the 5G mobile network arguing this will compromise national security

Huawei has stepped up its attack on Australia, with the company’s local chief technology and chief security officer David Soldani arguing that banning it from installing 5G was short-sighted.

‘Blocking companies from certain countries does nothing to make Australia any safer from cyber-security issues – in fact it just makes things worse because they are not addressing the real issues on cyber-security,’ he told the Emerging Innovation Summit in Melbourne on Monday.

Mr Soldani boasted that Huawei’s 6G mobile technology was already more advanced than its rivals, which made the 5G rollout ban redundant.

‘The current approach being taken towards cyber-security on 5G mobile networks solves absolutely nothing – and that will be exposed further in 6G,’ he said.

‘Huawei is already way ahead of our rivals on 6G research and we can see that the way in which we will be gathering and consuming data on those 6G networks means the cyber security risks will increase.’

Both sides of politics in Australia are in favour of banning Huawei from being part of the 5G rollout.

Huawei has stepped up its attack on Australia, with the company's local chief technology and chief security officer David Soldani arguing that banning it from installing 5G was short-sighted

Huawei has stepped up its attack on Australia, with the company’s local chief technology and chief security officer David Soldani arguing that banning it from installing 5G was short-sighted

The Australian Strategic Policy Institute also regards Huawei as a national security threat, based on the company’s close ties to the Chinese Communist Party. 

Last year, New Zealand followed Australia and also banned Huawei from installing 5G mobile.

The United States, Australia’s biggest defence ally, also bars Huawei from being part of their 5G rollout.

The United Kingdom has a partial Huawei ban, which stops it installing core parts of the 5G network but allowing it access to other areas of the mobile technology. 

Mr Soldani said the 6G network would pose more security risks than 5G, adding artificial intelligence could threaten lives.

Mr Soldani boasted that Huawei's 6G mobile technology was already more advanced than its rivals, which made the 5G rollout ban redundant

Mr Soldani boasted that Huawei’s 6G mobile technology was already more advanced than its rivals, which made the 5G rollout ban redundant

‘The way that future 6G networks are designed means that the attack surface is larger for potential attacks as the traditional network boundaries and security control zone become ever wider,’ he said.

‘AI will poses a significant impact on network security, as it might be exploited to launch more effective attacks, and in some scenarios, the security of AI systems is a matter of life and death.’

He questioned why Australia had not banned companies associated with the 5G supply chain.

‘It actually makes Australia less secure because it means we have to then increase our reliance on just one or two other vendors – neither of whom are having their equipment tested,’ Mr Soldani said. 

Huawei’s founder Ren Zhengfei was a member of the People’s Liberation Army before founding his technology company in 1987. 

Read more at DailyMail.co.uk


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