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Hundreds of gaming enthusiasts gather for Fortnite World Cup event in New York

Hundreds of gaming enthusiasts are descending on the Big Apple this weekend for a Fortnite World Cup event. 

Fortnite creator Epic Games is hosting the three-day convention, which begins on Friday and ends Sunday at the Arthur Ashe Stadium in Queens, and will see gamers play for a $30 million prize pool.

Around 40 million players worldwide tried to qualify over 10 weeks following an online competition, CNN Business reported. 

However only 100 solo finalists have a shot at winning the huge cash prize at Flushing Meadows.

Hundreds of gaming enthusiasts are descending on the Big Apple this weekend for a Fortnite World Cup event

A general view of the two-story, player stage inside of Arthur Ashe Stadium, designed by Steve Kidd and Guy Pavelo during previews ahead of the 2019 Fortnite World Cup on July 25

A general view of the two-story, player stage inside of Arthur Ashe Stadium, designed by Steve Kidd and Guy Pavelo during previews ahead of the 2019 Fortnite World Cup on July 25

Winners in the solo and duo categories can each receive $3 million, before taxes, with duo partners dividing the prize. 

Prizes for the Duos prize category will be awarded Saturday, and the solo champion will be crowned Sunday.

Epic Games, which is partially backed by China’s Tencent, held weeks of qualifying rounds to determine the finalists.  

It has given away an estimated $71.5 million in prizes so far this year, CNN reported. 

Lion Krause, whose Fortnite name is GL Lyght, travelled to New York from Germany to participate in the World Cup solo category. 

He told CNN Business: ‘My mother allowed me to start playing Fortnite just before my 12th birthday in September 2017. I played a lot in my free time and kept getting better and better each week. 

Epic Games told CNN Business that the event provided an opportunity for less well-known players to make a name for themselves.

Noam Ackenine

Daniel Walsh

Noam Ackenine, (left), and his friend, Daniel Walsh, (right),  are both pro Fortnite players and qualified for both the solos and duos event. They earn tens of thousands a year from the game 

An exterior view of Arthur Ashe Stadium as seen from the fan zone during previews ahead of the 2019 Fortnite World Cup in Queens

An exterior view of Arthur Ashe Stadium as seen from the fan zone during previews ahead of the 2019 Fortnite World Cup in Queens 

 

Fortnite's Raptor poses for a fan during the Fortnite World Cup Finals e-sports event at Arthur Ashe Stadium

Fortnite’s Raptor poses for a fan during the Fortnite World Cup Finals e-sports event at Arthur Ashe Stadium

A spokesman said: ‘It’s always been our intention that Fortnite competition be open and inclusive to players from all over the world, and we offered an open platform for anyone to prove themselves.’ 

Teenager Daniel Walsh claims he earns a staggering $80,000 each year from playing video games.

He added: ‘It feels wild, but it definitely feels real to me because I have grinded and I have put in the time, so I know I am one of the best and I know I can win the tournament.’  

His partner, Noam Ackenine, 14, told CNN that he earned $120,000 this year from gaming. 

The friends qualified for solos and duos and if either of them wins, they could walk away $4.5 million.

A view of the singles trophy on display ahead of the 2019 Fortnite World Cup World Cup on July 25 in NYC

A view of the singles trophy on display ahead of the 2019 Fortnite World Cup World Cup on July 25 in NYC 

Ackenine explained: ‘I started playing at 13, and all my friends talked about it and they said it was the next big game, so I just hopped on and started playing the game.’

Fortnite has been downloaded more than 40 million times and sees up to 100 players fight against each other in player versus player combat to be the last one standing.

There are an estimated 125 million players on Fortnite and it is hugely popular with children and teenagers because it can be played on mobile phones.

However there are some concerns that Fortnite is having a negative effect on childrens’ mental health. 

Doctors in Boston claimed they are were seeing children addicted to Fortnite with health problems that are typically only seen in adults. 

Dr. Lynne Karlson, general pediatrician at Floating Hospital For Children at Tufts Medical Center, said more of her patients struggling because of video games, particularly Fortnite and have conditions including carpal tunnel to sedentary obesity.

‘It’s a big disability in their lives because, for one, it interferes with their sleep. Often they’re playing late into the night or they get up early in the morning and they’re not getting enough sleep,’ Karlson was reported as saying to the Atlanta Constitution Journal. 

 

 

 

 

Read more at DailyMail.co.uk


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