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Hundreds of Muslim worshippers mark the end of Ramadan at Sydney mosque

Thousands of Muslim worshippers mark the end of Ramadan by praying outside a Sydney mosque after the holy site reached capacity

  • Hundreds of Muslim worshippers have gathered to mark the end of their month-long fast during Ramadan
  • Devotees spilled out into the car park of the Lakemba Mosque in Western Sydney as the holy site hit capacity
  • The event held extra significance this year after tensions between Israel and Palestinian boiled over this week

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Thousands of Muslim worshippers have celebrated the end of Ramadan by observing the Eid-al-Fitr festival.

Men, women and children descended on Lakemba Mosque in Sydney’s west to give thanks and commemorate the end of their month-long fast.

Devotees crammed inside and outside the holy site, saying their morning prayers in the car park after the mosque reached capacity.

This year’s event was made all the more significant with a dramatic escalation of hostilities between Israeli and Palestinian forcers this week.

Men, women and children descended on Lakemba Mosque in Sydney’s west (pictured) to give thanks and commemorate the end of their month-long fast

Muslim worshippers observe the morning Eid al-Fitr prayer, marking the end of the holy fasting month of Ramadan

Muslim worshippers observe the morning Eid al-Fitr prayer, marking the end of the holy fasting month of Ramadan

Worshippers take to the street to participate in Eid al-Fitr prayers, marking the end of the holy month of Ramadan, at the Lakemba Mosque in Sydney

Worshippers take to the street to participate in Eid al-Fitr prayers, marking the end of the holy month of Ramadan, at the Lakemba Mosque in Sydney

This year’s event was made all the more significant with a dramatic escalation of hostilities between Israeli and Palestinian forcers this week

This year’s event was made all the more significant with a dramatic escalation of hostilities between Israeli and Palestinian forcers this week

During Ramadan, Muslims fast during daylight hours and use the month as a period of introspection and communal prayer.

It is one of the five pillars of Islam alongside regular prayer, giving to the poor, a profession of faith and pilgrimage to Mecca.

Devout Muslims are expected to abide by the pillars of Islam to the best of their abilities.

When the month of Ramadan comes to a close, followers gather en masse to give a traditional prayer signifying its completion. 

The Eid-al-Fitr is one of only two major festivals in the Islamic faith and sees Muslims give money to the poor and needy as an obligatory act of charity.

Children are often given new clothing and gifts to celebrate the end of fasting.

During Ramadan, Muslims fast during daylight hours and use the month as a period of introspection and communal prayer. Pictured: A large crowd gathers outside Lakemba Mosque

During Ramadan, Muslims fast during daylight hours and use the month as a period of introspection and communal prayer. Pictured: A large crowd gathers outside Lakemba Mosque

During Ramadan, Muslims fast during daylight hours and use the month as a period of introspection and communal prayer

During Ramadan, Muslims fast during daylight hours and use the month as a period of introspection and communal prayer

Ramadan is one of the five pillars of Islam alongside regular prayer, giving to the poor, a profession of faith and pilgrimage to Mecca

Ramadan is one of the five pillars of Islam alongside regular prayer, giving to the poor, a profession of faith and pilgrimage to Mecca

Devout Muslim woman stand together to commemorate the end of Ramadan at the Lakemba Mosque in Sydney

Devout Muslim woman stand together to commemorate the end of Ramadan at the Lakemba Mosque in Sydney

This week tensions in the middle east boiled over with the Israeli Defence Force and Palestinian Militants exchanging deadly rocket fire.

Gaza’s Ministry of Health said IDF shelling has resulted in the deaths of 65 people, including 16 children.

The death toll on the Israeli side currently stands at six.

There are around 72,000 Muslims in the Canterbury-Bankstown Council area of Sydney, comprising 21 per cent of the local population, according to the 2016 Australia Bureau of Statistics data.

Across Sydney there are over 17,000 Palestinians.

Pictured: A large crowd flocks to the Lakemba Mosque to observe the end of Ramadan

Pictured: A large crowd flocks to the Lakemba Mosque to observe the end of Ramadan

Pictured: A large crowd at Lakemba Mosque spills out in the car park as devotees say a traditional prayer to mark the end of Ramadan

Pictured: A large crowd at Lakemba Mosque spills out in the car park as devotees say a traditional prayer to mark the end of Ramadan

Pictured: Muslim worshippers are seen at the Lakemba Mosque in Sydney taking part in the Eid al-Fitr festival

Pictured: Muslim worshippers are seen at the Lakemba Mosque in Sydney taking part in the Eid al-Fitr festival

Pictured: Hundreds of Muslim worshippers bow their heads as they say traditional prayers to market the end of Ramadan

Pictured: Hundreds of Muslim worshippers bow their heads as they say traditional prayers to market the end of Ramadan

There are around 72,000 Muslims in the Canterbury-Bankstown Council area of Sydney, comprising 21 per cent of the local population

There are around 72,000 Muslims in the Canterbury-Bankstown Council area of Sydney, comprising 21 per cent of the local population



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