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‘I love my Dalmatian skin’: Woman, 25, celebrates the psoriasis that COVERS her body

A woman whose body has been covered by inflamed spots has chosen to celebrate her ‘dalmatian skin’.

Georgia Crowther, from Hertfordshire, was just six-years-old when she woke up with inflamed patches of psoriasis across her entire body.

Psoriasis is a chronic disease that causes the skin to become red, irritable and flaky and affects around 650,000 people in the UK, including former Oasis frontman Liam Gallagher.

Growing up, Miss Crowther lacked confidence and received ‘very unkind’ comments from others.

But now, she embraces her skin. She said: ‘I think it looks nice and I think it looks pretty and I think it makes me look different’.   

‘When my psoriasis self-heals and the scars are left, it looks a bit like a Dalmatian so that is why I have adopted the name Dalmatian skin.’

Georgia Crowther, from Hertfordshire, has decided to publicly celebrate her 'Dalmation skin', after being self-conscious and judged by others in the past

Georgia Crowther, from Hertfordshire, has decided to publicly celebrate her ‘Dalmation skin’, after being self-conscious and judged by others in the past

Miss Crowther's skin is the best it has been since fixing her diet. She said: 'I am fighting the root cause, rather than just what is on the surface'

Miss Crowther’s skin is the best it has been since fixing her diet. She said: ‘I am fighting the root cause, rather than just what is on the surface’

The 25-year-old has battled psoriasis since she was six (pictured, psoriasis on her legs)

The 25-year-old has battled psoriasis since she was six (pictured, psoriasis on her legs)

Miss Crowther, whose psoriasis covers her body, said: 'It can be very itchy, very-very painful. I'll get it all over my legs, my arms, my back, my chest, my belly, my scalp'

Miss Crowther, whose psoriasis covers her body, said: ‘It can be very itchy, very-very painful. I’ll get it all over my legs, my arms, my back, my chest, my belly, my scalp’

When her condition is at its worse, she has to bathe up to four times a day and will constantly apply cream to moisturise the dry patches.

Miss Crowther said: ‘It can be very itchy, very-very painful. I’ll get it all over my legs, my arms, my back, my chest, my belly, my scalp.

‘But the actual pigmentation that it leaves I actually really like.’  

Despite loving the skin she’s in at the moment, Miss Crowther admits there have been many times where she has felt self-conscious because of her psoriasis.

She said: ‘With psoriasis, it isn’t just a physical issue, it is mental and emotional as well.

‘It can be so difficult to deal with, purely because I think you have this image of yourself in your head about the way you should look.

Growing up, Miss Crowther's skin suffered from the age of six (pictured as a child)

Growing up, Miss Crowther’s skin suffered from the age of six (pictured as a child)

Miss Crowther's mother Katie (pictured above), says her daughters confidence was affected growing up and people were 'very unkind' to her

Miss Crowther’s mother Katie (pictured above), says her daughters confidence was affected growing up and people were ‘very unkind’ to her

WHAT IS PSORIASIS?

Psoriasis is an immune condition that affects the skin and sometimes the joints.

Around two percent of people in the US and UK suffer from the condition.

Psoriasis occurs when a person’s skin replacement process takes place within days rather than the usual 21-to-28 days.

The accumulation of skin cells builds up to form raised plaques, which can be flaky, scaly and itchy. 

Psoriasis arthritis can occur in the joints near affected skin, causing them to become tender, swollen and stiff.

Anyone can suffer but psoriasis is more common in people in their late teens-to-early 30s or those between the ages of 50 and 60.

Psoriasis’ cause is unclear. Flare ups can be triggered by stress, skin injury, hormonal changes and certain medications.

It is not contagious and there is no cure.

Treatment focuses on managing symptoms via topical creams and gels. 

Source: Psoriasis Association  

‘I do get times where I feel really, really low and not confident and I don’t want to leave the house.’  

Her mother, Katie, remembers the extent to which psoriasis affected Miss Crowther’s confidence growing up.

She said: ‘There’s so many times where it has been really bad and it has always affected her because it is so visual.

‘People have judged her by it and have been very unkind to her.’ 

Many people’s psoriasis symptoms start or become worse because of a certain event, known as a ‘trigger’. 

Possible triggers of psoriasis include an injury to your skin, throat infections and using certain medicines.

Miss Crowther’s psoriasis was believed to have been triggered by a throat infection.

After switching to a plant-based diet, her skin has started to clear up. She credits her success to good food and an even better mindset.

She said: ‘Diet is the number one factor after mindset, after trying to lead a very stress free lifestyle.

‘For me, starting a completely new, clean diet is definitely a way that I am fighting the root cause, rather than just what is on the surface.

‘My psoriasis this year is the best it has ever been and it is purely because I am dealing with it from within rather than just putting a steroid cream on it.’

Although her skin condition has improved dramatically over the past few months, Miss Crowther still wants to find ways of raising awareness, so that she can help others who are going through similar experiences.

One of the ways in which she is doing this is through her Instagram, where she shares her psoriasis journey and provides advice on skincare and different immune-boosting recipes.

She said: ‘I just want people to feel that they aren’t alone because I have felt so alone growing up with a condition and I don’t want anyone else to feel the way that I felt.

‘When someone messages you and says that, “You inspire me”, it is amazing.’

'Diet is the number one factor after mindset', says Georgia, who follows a plant-based (vegan) diet. Above, making a smoothie at her home in Hertfordshire 

‘Diet is the number one factor after mindset’, says Georgia, who follows a plant-based (vegan) diet. Above, making a smoothie at her home in Hertfordshire 

She’s also training to become a personal trainer, specialising in helping those who suffer with skin conditions like psoriasis.

Miss Crowther said: ‘I would really like to focus my clientele on the skin condition community, because I just want people to be able to exercise and to be active without being in pain and without being embarrassed.

‘I believe that I was given psoriasis because I was a strong enough person to deal with it and because I know that I can do amazing things.

‘It is part of you, it is not everything about you. It is just a small part of who you are as a person and if people aren’t accepting and don’t love you for who you are then you don’t need those people in your life.’

Read more at DailyMail.co.uk


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