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Ian Fleming’s great niece Hum, 29, shares graphic photos of her blood-stained pillows

Ian Fleming’s great niece Hum has shared photographs of her blood-stained pillows and blistered tongue after suffering an epileptic fit in the night.

Hum – short for Hermione – first experienced a seizure when she was a teenager and watching television with her father, Roddie, at her Oxfordshire home.

After what she described as an ‘out-of-body experience’, Hum, 29, fronted Young Epilepsy’s In The Moment campaign, which encourages young people to talk about their condition.

But now, Hum has extended her quest for epilepsy awareness to her typically glamorous Instagram account – with two uncensored photographs of the aftermath of an overnight fit.

Hum – short for Hermione – Fleming, 29, first experienced an epileptic fit when she was a teenager and watching television with her father, Roddie, at her Oxfordshire home

Taking to her Instagram Stories on Sunday, the fashion PR worker explained she had been debating whether or not to post the photographs, which she said are sometimes the ‘only evidence’ of her overnight fits.

She said: ‘Over the course of today I  have been umming and ahhing about whether to post this or not… I’m sure some will be shocked by the next few pictures and it is certainly not in keeping with the Bank Holiday bliss of rosé, ice creams and bikinis!

‘However having set out to be an advocate for epilepsy it is important to document my journey warts and all…’

Hum added that ‘as horrible as it might be’ she hopes to ‘educate people’ about the symptoms, side effects and ‘home truths’ surrounding the condition.

She has now shared uncensored photographs of the aftermath of an overnight fit, explaining that sometimes blood on her sheets (pictured) is the 'only evidence' the seizure took place

She has now shared uncensored photographs of the aftermath of an overnight fit, explaining that sometimes blood on her sheets (pictured) is the ‘only evidence’ the seizure took place

‘As horrible as it might be I hope this honesty can educate people further into the symptoms, side effects and home truths about an illness which is now more common than diabetes yet is still so little discussed and ill-understood.’

Explaining the two photographs which were to follow, Hum confessed that ‘at some point in the night’ she had suffered a nocturnal seizure.

She said: ‘At some point in the night I unknowingly had a nocturnal seizure. These are a form of seizure that often go unnoticed.

‘Having had epilepsy since 15 it was only when an ex-boyfriend witnessed two that we realised how frequently I was having them in the night.

A second photograph pictured her bleeding and blistered tongue, which it appeared she had repeatedly bitten during the fit

A second photograph pictured her bleeding and blistered tongue, which it appeared she had repeatedly bitten during the fit

On her Instagram Stories, Hum confessed that 'at some point in the night' she had suffered a nocturnal seizure

On her Instagram Stories, Hum confessed that ‘at some point in the night’ she had suffered a nocturnal seizure

‘If alone – the only evidence I have are the following pictures…’

The first photograph showed her pillows after the seizure, which were ‘soaking from blood and dribble’.

A second pictured her bleeding and blistered tongue, which it appeared she had repeatedly bitten during the fit.

Hum’s epilepsy also damaged her long-term memory, but she recently told the Times there are upsides, such as not being able to remember bad things.

She said: ‘There is a great side-effect, that I can also forget all the s**t times in life as well.

Hum added that 'as horrible as it might be' she hopes to 'educate people' about the symptoms, side effects and 'home truths' surrounding the condition

Hum added that ‘as horrible as it might be’ she hopes to ‘educate people’ about the symptoms, side effects and ‘home truths’ surrounding the condition

She said: 'At some point in the night I unknowingly had a nocturnal seizure. These are a form of seizure that often go unnoticed'

She said: ‘At some point in the night I unknowingly had a nocturnal seizure. These are a form of seizure that often go unnoticed’

‘So when everyone else is crying about their ex-boyfriend three years later, I’ll have forgotten about him in a year’s time.’

Hum, who is the relative of Bond writer Ian Fleming, experienced her first epileptic fit when she was 13 and watching television at home in Oxfordshire.

She explained how she felt as if she was having an ‘out-of-body experience’ and that ‘everything went out of focus.’

Ever since then she has only been able to remember six months back into the past, but all her memories from before the fit at 13 are clear.

Hum (pictured in March) also has problems with her long-term memory due to her epilepsy, and is only able to remember six months into the past

Hum (pictured in March) also has problems with her long-term memory due to her epilepsy, and is only able to remember six months into the past

Hum was diagnosed at the age of 15 after two years of tests. By that stage, she was having around three episodes a week.

Initially, they were thought to stem from blood pressure, heart issues or panic attacks.

She told the Daily Mail: ‘We’d reached the point where the words “brain tumour” were being bandied around, which was pretty terrifying.

‘Oddly, it was such a relief to have the label of epilepsy rather than endlessly trying to explain I wasn’t just some hysterical girl.’



Read more at DailyMail.co.uk


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