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Injection releases aspirin over a month

  • The jab releases 8% aspirin in week one, 13% in week two and 20% by week four
  • Aspirin is combined with the sweetener xylitol, which together form a bond
  • This bond is slowly broken down, resulting in the drug’s gradual release 
  • Previous research suggests this would ease the drug’s side effects, like nausea
  • Xylitol was chosen as it is harmless and does not interfere with aspirin’s action 

Scientists have developed an injection that could see the end of popping painkillers.

The jab, which contains aspirin, releases eight per cent of the drug in the first week, 13 per cent in the second and 20 per cent by week four, new research reveals.

It works by combining aspirin with the sweetener xylitol, which form a bond that is slowly broken down over time, resulting in the drug being gradually released into the bloodstream, a study found.  

Previous research demonstrates the painkiller’s gradual release eases its side effects, such as nausea, abdominal pain and drowsiness. 

Study author Kaushik Chatterjee, from the Indian Institute of Science in Bangalore, said: ‘Unlike pills that release all the drug at the same time, this would allow the molecule to circulate longer and have a more prolonged effect.’ 

Scientists have developed an injection that could see the end of popping painkillers (stock)

TYPE 2 DIABETICS SHOULD TAKE ASPIRIN TWICE A DAY TO PREVENT HEART DISEASE 

Taking aspirin twice a day may help protect people with type 2 diabetes from suffering a heart attack or stroke, research revealed last month.

When taken the recommended once a day, patients suffer an increased risk of blood clotting between doses, a study found. Blood clots can lead to cardiovascular disease (CVD), such as heart attacks and stroke.

Researchers advise patients have the drug twice over 24 hours to reduce their likelihood of suffering ‘clumps’ between administrations.

Study author Dr Liv Vernstroem from Aarhus University Hospital in Denmark, said: ‘Given that platelets in people with diabetes are characterised by increased aggregation and increased turnover rates, our study indicates that patients with type 2 diabetes may achieve additional benefit from twice daily rather than once daily dosing of aspirin.’ 

Reduces side effects and improves patient convenience  

As well as easing aspirin’s side effects, the injection could aid patient convenience by removing the need to remember to take medication. 

Xylitol, which occurs naturally in fruit and vegetables, was chosen as the molecule to combine with aspirin as it is harmless and does not interfere with the drug’s action. 

When the injection was tested with blood cells in the laboratory, the rate aspirin was released reduced inflammation, which plays a role in pain.

Mr Chatterjee said: ‘Unlike pills that release all the drug at the same time, this would allow the molecule to circulate longer and have a more prolonged effect.’

Aspirin is commonly used as a painkiller, as well as blood thinner to prevent conditions such as stroke.

It is unclear when the injection could be available.  

The findings were published in the International Journal of Pharmaceutics.  

Read more at DailyMail.co.uk