News, Culture & Society

Inside house where William Tyrrell spent his FINAL hours and bedroom he slept in before vanishing

Never before seen images of the inside of the house house where William Tyrrell spent his last hours and and the bedroom he slept in before vanishing without a trace have emerged.

Video obtained by Daily Mail Australia of police walking William’s foster grandmother through the morning of the tragedy shows the precise spot from which the toddler left the verandah in his Spider-Man suit, as well as the side yard from where he was allegedly abducted.

The grandma, who has since died, was a very fit and sprightly woman who gave a thorough account about what unfolded that morning, although her memory differs in certain details from that of William’s foster parents.

The interior of his foster grandmother’s house had two Santa photographs of William, a drawing he had done stuck on the fridge and a framed photograph of him with his foster mother at a farm.

At that point, the grandmother had been living in the house in the NSW Mid North Coast town of Kendall for almost 24 years. 

On the morning he  vanished, he had a minor fight over a toy with another child staying in the house, had scrambled eggs and orange juice for breakfast and was throwing objects and displaying unsettled behaviour before he vanished.

She said William ‘was full of life, full of energy, bouncing out of his skull with happiness and just joy of living’.

‘And that’s the last I saw of him. As I was sitting there, that’s when he went around … that’s my last memory of William, going around the corner.’  

William Tyrrell spent his last night sleeping in this bedroom (above) with his foster father before waking at 5.50am on the final confirmed day of the toddler’s short life

William sometime slept in the bedroom alone while the foster mother and father slept on an inflatable mattress in the living room, but sleeping arrangements changed on the last fateful trip

William sometime slept in the bedroom alone while the foster mother and father slept on an inflatable mattress in the living room, but sleeping arrangements changed on the last fateful trip  

William's foster grandmother with Detective Partridge in the kitchen where one of William's drawings is taped to the fridge and his last Santa photos, from 2012 and 2013, displays in the living room

William’s foster grandmother with Detective Partridge in the kitchen where one of William’s drawings is taped to the fridge and his last Santa photos, from 2012 and 2013, displays in the living room

Speaking with police on the afternoon of September 18, 2014, the foster grandma leads Senior Constable Vanessa Partridge from Port Macquarie Police inside the house from which William had vanished just six days before.

As explained in a police interview with the boy’s foster mother, also exclusively obtained by Daily Mail Australia, the modestly furnished three bedroom house was decorated with photos of William.

Marked on a floor plan for police, the foster mother pointed out where William’s last two Santa photos, from 2012 and 2013, toys kept in cupboard for his visits and the sleeping arrangements.

‘Sometimes we would take our blow up mattress up there and the (foster father) and I would sleep on that in the lounge room,’ the foster mother said.

But the night before he vanished, William slept with the foster father, in a small bedroom with lace curtains, vertical blinds and a blue and white bedside lamp, on a bed with pink and green blankets.

In his first police statement, the foster father says William ‘is a real restless sleeper’, after they both woke around 5.50am.

Police asked the foster mother to mark out a floor plan (above) of the house from which William vanished with items relating to the toddler, which included his Santa photos and a drawing her made attached to the fridge

Police asked the foster mother to mark out a floor plan (above) of the house from which William vanished with items relating to the toddler, which included his Santa photos and a drawing her made attached to the fridge

After watching cartoons on his foster father’s phone, William went into his foster grandmother’s room next to the kitchen and woke her.

William made several trips to the toy cupboard and started playing in the lounge room near the grandmother at the dining room table, the foster mother told police.

She said the foster father left for his online meeting and errands, a ten minute drive away in Lakewood, just after she had phoned washing machine repair man Bill Speeding and left a message 

The grandmother believes it was earlier, telling police, ‘He certainly wasn’t there when we had breakfast about 8 o’clock. He would have gone by eight’.

Before he left, the foster father told police, William and another child ‘were fighting over this toy’ which was similar to a car dashboard with a steering wheel and a key, before having breakfast.

‘He’s a really good eater … he’s probably only about sixteen or seventeen kilos. He’s this, this tiny little, little boy (but) he’s strong you know. 

William's foster grandma sits in the same chair she was photographed in William's 'proof of life' Spider-Man image and points out to Detective Partridge where William was playing

William’s foster grandma sits in the same chair she was photographed in William’s ‘proof of life’ Spider-Man image and points out to Detective Partridge where William was playing

The grandmother (seated with the newspaper) said William became 'fed up' on the patio with drawing and playing dice and  ran off 'bouncing out of his skull with happiness'

The grandmother (seated with the newspaper) said William became ‘fed up’ on the patio with drawing and playing dice and  ran off ‘bouncing out of his skull with happiness’

The side of the foster grandmother's house showing the carport above which lies the room in which William slept in for his last night before disappearing around the corner

The side of the foster grandmother’s house showing the carport above which lies the room in which William slept in for his last night before disappearing around the corner

 ‘He’s got asthma.. sometimes he’ll even need I think it’s call Redipred … a steroid. But we only give that in the absolute worse case scenario.’

The foster grandmother said after breakfast, her daughter then ‘went off with the children… and I think that’s when she went down there playing monsters.

 ‘When she went off… I would have done the washing up. And when I finish the dishes we’re out here on the patio.

‘And this is where it all happened.’

Leading two detectives out onto the wooden verandah – the same ‘patio’ where William was photographed in the iconic Spider-Man image –  the grandmother sits down in the same chair she is sitting on in the iconic Spider-Man image 

She said William drew pictures with crayons, ‘got fed up’, and while he was doing so was photographed by his foster mother, ‘that photo of him in the Spider-Man suit, that was taken here’.

‘Then (the foster mother) had him throwing the dice, and he was THROWING the dice and she had to teach him that you don’t, just let it roll out of your hand. 

The foster grandmother tells detectives 'He was sort of taking over everything and we said "roar, I'm a tiger" and he just disappeared around the corner of the house. And that’s the last I saw of him'

The foster grandmother tells detectives ‘He was sort of taking over everything and we said “roar, I’m a tiger” and he just disappeared around the corner of the house. And that’s the last I saw of him’

She said her final look at William ‘he was in that boisterous, happy, energetic little phase’ and she believed he would have run down the hill sloping away from her house towards the road

William's foster mother (above) ran down the hill to look for William, the foster grandmother said

The foster grandmother said she met neighbour Anne Maree Sharpley (above) on the street

William’s foster mother  (left) ran down the hill to look for William, the foster grandmother said, while she met neighbour Anne Maree Sharpley (right) on the street 

 ‘But he still wanted to throw it. He got sick of that as well.’

It was after that, she said, came the last actions of the little boy observed by anyone other than his abductor, the ‘daddy tiger’ game.

‘He was sort of taking over everything and we said “roar, I’m a tiger” and  he just disappeared around the corner of the house.

‘As I was sitting there, that’s when he went around … and that’s my last memory of William, going around the corner.

‘And he was full of life, full of energy, bouncing out of his skull with happiness and just joy of living. And that’s the last I saw of him.’ 

The foster grandmother (above) leading Det. Partridge out to the verandah, said after William vanished 'my first thought, he’s been taken … because knowing the little boy ... he’s not the type to wander'

The foster grandmother (above) leading Det. Partridge out to the verandah, said after William vanished ‘my first thought, he’s been taken … because knowing the little boy … he’s not the type to wander’

Police search the foster grandmother's house in November last year after a new 'high intensity' investigation into the William Tyrrel case was launched by the Strike Force Rosann

Police search the foster grandmother’s house in November last year after a new ‘high intensity’ investigation into the William Tyrrel case was launched by the Strike Force Rosann

The foster grandmother points out to police where she walked when she couldn't find her daughter and the met a neighbour in the street where it was 'deathly quiet'

The foster grandmother points out to police where she walked when she couldn’t find her daughter and the met a neighbour in the street where it was ‘deathly quiet’

 Detective  Partridge asks the grandmother what happened next and is told that ‘between four and  five minutes’ later her daughter disappeared after William.

After remaining seated ‘for some time, then I didn’t hear from her, I got up and followed them down.’

Leading the detective around the side of the house she said, ‘I walked all the way down here wondering what’s going on’ and agreed she still couldn’t see her daughter and so ‘I went all the way down to the road.

‘When I got down to the road I could see Anne Maree (Sharpley) who lives there.  

 ‘It was absolutely deathly quiet. Still. Nothing. I was down on the road talking with Anne Maree and then (the foster mother) came up very distraught and said “I’ve got to call the police”. 

 ‘I think I was walking up when (the foster father) arrived and he was distraught as well. 

‘How he knew at that stage I’m not too sure, he’d tell you, I’m not too sure, then he started running around. Everybody was running around.’ 

The foster mother (above) slept in an adjacent bedroom on the night before William vanished which is located above the the carport at the side of the house  

The foster father's mother-in-law described to police how he had returned 'distraught' and that her daughter 'would have phoned him'  befor ehe pulled into the driveway at the house

The foster father’s mother-in-law described to police how he had returned ‘distraught’ and that her daughter ‘would have phoned him’  befor ehe pulled into the driveway at the house

The grandmother said that afternoon it became ‘chaotic’ and was ‘a blur’ as the search for missing William began.

‘I do remember feeling he’s been taken. That was my first thought, he’s been taken … because knowing the little boy … he’s not the type to wander.’

The woman pointed down the hill to the slope of the street running down from her house. 

‘I thought when I first … that he’s run down there, because he was in that boisterous, happy, energetic little phase, I can imagine him running down there.

‘I also thought he could run straight through there (she points across the road), so he would have run along the road down there.

But it would have been so out of character. She would know that better than I. When she came back and said I’ll get the police, it clicked, he’s been taken

‘I don’t know how. I mean I’m very grateful everybody’s been searching. I never ever thought he’d be found around here, he was taken.

‘She saw cars down there. I never saw any cars

‘How he (the foster father) knew at that stage, I’m not … she would have told him, she would have phoned him, he was just distraught.’

***
Read more at DailyMail.co.uk