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Inside Man is the all-star thriller set to have you hooked

The autumn TV boom brings with it new BBC thriller Inside Man that has been hailed ‘deliciously dark’ and ‘gripping’ by critics – and is set to have viewers hooked. 

The four-part series, which premieres tonight on BBC One, stars British TV heavyweight David Tennant as Harry Watling, a village vicar who becomes entangled in a dark secret that threatens to destroy his life. 

Half a world away, on death row in a US prison, is Jefferson Grieff (Stanley Tucci), a convicted killer and leading professor of criminology who is called upon to help solve difficult cases.

The four-part series, which premieres tonight on BBC One, stars British TV heavyweight David Tennant as Harry Watling, a village vicar who becomes entangled in a dark secret that threatens to destroy his life

Half a world away, on death row in a US prison, is Jefferson Grieff (Stanley Tucci), a convicted killer and leading professor of criminology who is called upon to help solve difficult cases

Half a world away, on death row in a US prison, is Jefferson Grieff (Stanley Tucci), a convicted killer and leading professor of criminology who is called upon to help solve difficult cases

The two parallel storylines slowly intersect when Grieff is profiled by British journalist Beth Davenport (It's A Sin star Lydia West) who seeks his help on a case involving her friend

The two parallel storylines slowly intersect when Grieff is profiled by British journalist Beth Davenport (It’s A Sin star Lydia West) who seeks his help on a case involving her friend

The two parallel storylines slowly intersect when Grieff is profiled by British journalist Beth Davenport (It’s A Sin star Lydia West) who seeks his help on a case involving her friend, a maths tutor, whose client is Watling’s son. 

Although details of the plot have been kept tightly under wraps, TV critics given a sneak peek have given the series rave reviews, describing it as ‘absorbing’, ‘gripping’ and ‘deliciously dark’.

James Hibbs writes in his four-star review for Radio Times: ‘Inside Man is a devilishly, deliciously dark piece of drama, hinging on a string of catastrophically bad decisions made throughout the first episode. 

‘Audible gasps could be heard at an early screening ahead of its BBC One premiere, and it’s easy to imagine that effect being replicated nation-wide, even for those who see the impending doom coming.’ 

Speaking on his role, Tennant said the premise of the show is 'very hard to sum up' because there are 'two separate worlds' that exist side by side. Pictured, in the series

Speaking on his role, Tennant said the premise of the show is ‘very hard to sum up’ because there are ‘two separate worlds’ that exist side by side. Pictured, in the series

Although details of the plot have been kept tightly under wraps, TV critics given a sneak peek have given the series rave reviews, describing it as 'absorbing', 'gripping' and 'deliciously dark'. Pictured: Dillon Kempton (Atkins Estimond) and Jefferson Grieff (Stanley Tucci)

Although details of the plot have been kept tightly under wraps, TV critics given a sneak peek have given the series rave reviews, describing it as ‘absorbing’, ‘gripping’ and ‘deliciously dark’. Pictured: Dillon Kempton (Atkins Estimond) and Jefferson Grieff (Stanley Tucci)

James Hibbs writes in his four-star review for Radio Times: 'Inside Man is a devilishly, deliciously dark piece of drama, hinging on a string of catastrophically bad decisions made throughout the first episode.' Pictured, Jefferson Grieff (Stanley Tucci)

James Hibbs writes in his four-star review for Radio Times: ‘Inside Man is a devilishly, deliciously dark piece of drama, hinging on a string of catastrophically bad decisions made throughout the first episode.’ Pictured, Jefferson Grieff (Stanley Tucci)

Dan Einav writes in the Financial Times: 'This absorbing new BBC drama... explores this fatalistic idea that goodness can readily cede to evil — and the more optimistic inverse, that it can also re-emerge... One man is willing to follow a path of self-preservation at all costs; the other is guided by notions of “moral worth” and justice.' Pictured, Harry Watling (David Tennant)

Dan Einav writes in the Financial Times: ‘This absorbing new BBC drama… explores this fatalistic idea that goodness can readily cede to evil — and the more optimistic inverse, that it can also re-emerge… One man is willing to follow a path of self-preservation at all costs; the other is guided by notions of “moral worth” and justice.’ Pictured, Harry Watling (David Tennant)

Dan Einav writes in the Financial Times: ‘This absorbing new BBC drama… explores this fatalistic idea that goodness can readily cede to evil — and the more optimistic inverse, that it can also re-emerge… One man is willing to follow a path of self-preservation at all costs; the other is guided by notions of “moral worth” and justice.’ 

A trailer for the series offers a glimpse at what viewers might expect, including scenes of violence, edge-of-your-seat tension, and a maths teacher trapped in a cellar. 

Speaking on his role, Tennant said the premise of the show is ‘very hard to sum up’ because there are ‘two separate worlds’ that exist side by side. 

‘Part of the joy of watching the show is wondering if these worlds are ever going to collide,’ he said. 

A trailer for the series (pictured) offers a glimpse at what viewers might expect, including scenes of violence, edge-of-your-seat tension, and a maths teacher trapped in a cellar

A trailer for the series (pictured) offers a glimpse at what viewers might expect, including scenes of violence, edge-of-your-seat tension, and a maths teacher trapped in a cellar

Dillon Kempton (Atkins Estimond), Jefferson Grieff (Stanley Tucci) and Beth Davenport (It's A Sin star Lydia West) pictured in the series

Dillon Kempton (Atkins Estimond), Jefferson Grieff (Stanley Tucci) and Beth Davenport (It’s A Sin star Lydia West) pictured in the series

Speaking on his role, Tennant (pictured in the series) said: 'Part of the joy of watching the show is wondering if these worlds are ever going to collide'

Speaking on his role, Tennant (pictured in the series) said: ‘Part of the joy of watching the show is wondering if these worlds are ever going to collide’

Ben Watling (Louis Oliver) and Harry Watling (David Tennant) in the BBC's Inside Man

Ben Watling (Louis Oliver) and Harry Watling (David Tennant) in the BBC’s Inside Man

Edgar Hopperwood (Mark Quartley) pictured in the BBC's new all-star thriller

Edgar Hopperwood (Mark Quartley) pictured in the BBC’s new all-star thriller 

‘But from my character’s point of view, it’s a story about a man who, in pursuit of doing the right thing, makes a series of catastrophically bad decisions.’

The actor continued: ‘It’s very difficult I think to immediately imagine how they will ever come together on different sides of the world, for these characters living entirely separate existence, they couldn’t seem to be more different.

‘Yet as an audience we assume there must be some link but really we’re quite far into the story before those links start to appear. 

‘It’s part of the set- up of the sort of puzzle of that along with the almost breath-taking awfulness of what occurs, the incremental steps to doom that Harry takes, the unravelling of normality. Steven described it as a sitcom that goes terribly wrong.’

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