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Inside the bitter $63MILLION Powerball Lotto feud Kalgoorlie, WA

Inside the bitter $63million Powerball feud as owners of winning ‘pay off your mortgage’ syndicate head to court to stop government worker collecting $260,000 slice of mega Lotto win

  • Mark Ing entered a Lotto syndicate earlier this year run Tania and Kevin Parkes 
  • Syndicate named ‘pay off your mortgage’ won half the $120m Powerball jackpot
  • The Parkes’ say Mr Ing bought into another syndicate that did not win
  • Do you know more? Email charlotte.karp@mailonline.com 

A furious row has erupted over a $63million Powerball win amid claims a member of an unsuccessful lotto syndicate is claiming a $260,000 slice of the jackpot. 

The owners of winning ‘pay off your mortgage’ syndicate, Tania and Kevin Parkes, have gone to court stop Mark Ing – a government worker who allegedly bought a ticket in another syndicate –  from collecting a share of the winnings. 

The couple, which own City News Kalgoorlie and another newsagency in the city in regional Western Australia, run multiple syndicates for different Lotto prize pools in the state.

The syndicates offer participants the chance to win big for the relatively low price of just $100 each.

On February 24, the Mr and Mrs Parkes and the 248 others who entered #2 Syndicate – named ‘pay off your mortgage’ – were overjoyed when they found out they won $261,986 each, which was half the total $120million Powerball jackpot.

Tania and Kevin Parkes (pictured with their children after their Powerball numbers were called) run a number of Lotto syndicates from their newsagency in WA

Mark Ing (pictured) used to work in consumer protection for the Western Australian government

Mark Ing (pictured) used to work in consumer protection for the Western Australian government 

LOTTO SYNDICATES, EXPLAINED: 

A Lotto syndicate works by offering tickets to individual subscribers. In this case, tickets were $100 each. 

The money is pooled and operators use the funds to buy lottery tickets.

If the syndicate lottery ticket wins a prize, the prize is divided equally between the subscribers. 

In this particular instance, when a syndicate ticket is sold, an individually-numbered copy of the ticket is generated by the Lotterywest equipment at the newsagency. 

That ticket is either collected by the subscriber, or held by the newsagency – pending collection. 

City News in Kalgoorlie allows subscribers to purchase syndicate tickets over the phone. 

The newsagency then records the payment and, when the payment is confirmed, issues a ticket and records the number. 

The agency keeps the ticket in a folder created for the subscriber.

‘Still absolutely buzzing. Thanks for an unbelievable unforgettable night guys,’ the couple wrote four days later on Facebook.

‘Wish we could have partied with all 250. Although feels like we did. May be a few sore heads in the morning.

‘We f***ing did it!’

But what should have been a feel-good situation quickly turned sour when Mr Ing turned up at a Lotterywest office claiming he was part of the winning syndicate – which the Parkes alleged was not true.

According to documents filed in the Supreme Court in April, Mr Ing was able to make a claim for the cash – pending proof that he subscribed to the winning syndicate. 

Lotterywest said that if the winning Syndicate #2 ticket was found, either the owners of the syndicate or Mr Ing could mail it to officials.

The Parkes allege they subsequently reviewed their records and discovered Mr Ing had bought into the unsuccessful #1 Syndicate – before subscriptions to the winning syndicate opened.

The Parkes claimed they asked Mr Ing to tell Lotterywest of the findings, but he maintained his claim on the winnings and refused to speak with them.

Lotterywest paid the winnings to all #2 Syndicate subscribers on March 11, except Mr Ing.

However on April 14 – even though there was a formal dispute over the winnings – officials told the couple they intended to pay Mr Ing.

The payout has since been blocked by the Supreme Court.

Kevin and Tania Parkes (pictured) were overjoyed when they won Powerball - along with 248 others

Kevin and Tania Parkes (pictured) were overjoyed when they won Powerball – along with 248 others

Members of the Lotto syndicate were offered tickets for $100 each. Pictured: The winning Powerball ticket

Members of the Lotto syndicate were offered tickets for $100 each. Pictured: The winning Powerball ticket

 Mr Ing has worked as a senior regional officer at the Government of Western Australia’s department of Mines, Industry Regulation and Safety since March 2020.

Prior to that, he worked at the Consumer Protection’s Property Industries branch as a compliance officer.

The matter will return to court on August 2.

A middle-aged man from Coffs Harbour in NSW won the other half of the $120million Powerball jackpot.

Kevin and Tania Parkes run a newsagency in Kalgoorlie. After the winning numbers were called, they celebrated with some of the syndicate members

Kevin and Tania Parkes run a newsagency in Kalgoorlie. After the winning numbers were called, they celebrated with some of the syndicate members

POWERBALL FEUD TIMELINE:

February, 2022: Kevin and Tanya Parkes start selling Lotto tickets for Syndicate #1. Days later, they start selling tickets within Syndicate #2.

Mark Ing buys a ticket in one of the syndicates. 

February 24: Powerball is drawn and Syndicate #2 wins half the division 1 prize – $63million. The money will be split between 250 people who subscribed to the syndicate.

February 28: Lotterywest asks most of the syndicate subscribers, including Mr and Mrs Parkes, for their individually numbered tickets to prove they bought the winning ticket. 

Mr Ing attends a Lotterywest office and alleged he bought a Syndicate #2 ticket.

The Parkes could not find records stating Mr Ing bought a ticket in Syndicate #2, but Mr Ing continues to claim he did.

March 11: $261,9860 is paid to each winner, except Mr Ing. 

April 14: Despite a formal dispute over the winnings, Lotterywest told the Parkes that it intended to disburse the winnings to Mr Ing. 

The Supreme Court barred the payment from being made. 

The case will return to court on August 2.

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Read more at DailyMail.co.uk