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Instagram influencers complain about having to slash their rates during the coronavirus pandemic 

Angry Instagram influencers are slashing their rates by up to 50% and even working for free as their income dries up during the coronavirus pandemic

  • Influencers are having slash their rates for a post during the coronavirus crisis
  • Some social media stars are offering to cut their asking price in half this month
  • One star who normally demands $5,000 per post is now asking for just $2,000 
  • Learn more about how to help people impacted by COVID

Instagram influencers are having to slash their rates as their income starts to dry up because of the coronavirus pandemic.

The demand for social media stars promoting products has diminished after the Australian economy was brought to a crashing halt as the crisis took a tighter grip.

Hundreds of businesses were forced to close when the government ramped up social distancing measures last month to slow the spread of the deadly illness.  

And now influencers are doing whatever it takes to ensure brands continue to book them. 

One influencer dropped their fee for a post from $5,000 to $2,000, while another star who was charging a fee of $1350 for a post is now charging $600.

Model Rozalia Russian (pictured) has been doing some posts for free to support Australian businesses during the downturn

Australian travel influencer Lauren Bullen (pictured) says she has been cautious about the content she posts during the crisis

Australian travel influencer Lauren Bullen (pictured) says she has been cautious about the content she posts during the crisis

‘Some, not all, are offering 50 per cent reductions,’ Sarah Gale, managing director of public relations firm AMPR told the Daily Telegraph. 

Model Rozalia Russian has been doing some posts for free to support Australian businesses during the downturn.

‘It’s not about cancelling jobs and campaigns, what we have done with all my clients is put things on hold or tweaked the overall strategy until we come out of this.

‘Until that time, I will continue supporting my brands and clients in any way I can, even if it means shooting some at-home content for them at no charge, because we really need to stick together and support each other so we can all get through this.’

'(We're) having to think about not really travelling too much at the moment because it could be seen negatively to be promoting travel at a time like this

‘(We’re) having to think about not really travelling too much at the moment because it could be seen negatively to be promoting travel at a time like this

Influencers have been forced to adapt during the pandemic (Pictured: Australian travel influencer Lauren Bullen)

Influencers have been forced to adapt during the pandemic (Pictured: Australian travel influencer Lauren Bullen)

Influencers are having to be careful how they market to their audience during the crisis as certain posts could be seen as poor taste, Roxy Jacenko, of social media agency Ministry of Talent, said. 

She said now is not the time to be posting images of yourself in flash cars or on lavish getaways because ‘the world is hurting’.

Australian travel influencer Lauren Bullen told Nine she has been cautious about the content she posts.

‘(We’re) having to think about not really travelling too much at the moment because it could be seen negatively to be promoting travel at a time like this.’

Influencers are having to be careful how they market to their audience during the crisis as certain posts could be seen as poor taste, Roxy Jacenko (pictured), of social media agency Ministry of Talent, said

Influencers are having to be careful how they market to their audience during the crisis as certain posts could be seen as poor taste, Roxy Jacenko (pictured), of social media agency Ministry of Talent, said

 



Read more at DailyMail.co.uk