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Italian wine-makers strip ‘prosecco’ from labels and use ‘Valdobbiadene’ instead

What a mouthful! Italian wine-makers strip ‘prosecco’ from labels and use ‘Valdobbiadene’ instead because newer vineyards have cheapened the name

  • Makers from the Veneto region of Italy have stripped ‘prosecco’ from their labels
  • They are now dubbing their fizz Conegliano and Valdobbiadene after the traditional source of the wine
  • This is unlikely to deter Britons who consumed 121million bottles of it last year 

For the makers of some of Italy’s finest sparkling wines have stripped the word ‘prosecco’ from their labels in favour of ‘Valdobbiadene’

It is harder to pronounce than prosecco – even before you’ve had a glass.

But those cultivating a sophisticated palate should learn to get their tongues around the word Valdobbiadene when reaching for the fizz.

For the makers of some of Italy’s finest sparkling wines have stripped the word ‘prosecco’ from their labels, saying newer vineyards have cheapened the name and cashed in on the drink’s popularity.

The makers, from the Veneto region of northern Italy, are now dubbing their fizz Conegliano and Valdobbiadene – named after the traditional source of the wine. 

This comes amid scathing remarks from Russell Norman, founder of the Polpo Venetian restaurants, who labelled prosecco a drink for ‘wearers of novelty T-shirts’ and the ‘hordes of daytime drinkers who haven’t been able to score a Prozac prescription’.

Prosecco is named after the grape used to make it. Fizz-mad Britons consumed 121 million bottles of it last year

Prosecco is named after the grape used to make it. Fizz-mad Britons consumed 121 million bottles of it last year

But his remarks may be of little concern to fizz-mad Britons – who consumed 121million bottles of the drink last year.

Prosecco is named after the grape used to make it. 

However, in 2009 the grape was renamed Glera by the EU so prosecco could be used solely as wine’s name. 

Read more at DailyMail.co.uk