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Jake Patterson, sentenced to life in prison for killing a couple is moved to New Mexico prison

Jayme Closs’s notorious abductor Jake Patterson has been moved to an undisclosed location ‘for his own protection’ after intense publicity over the shocking case. 

Wisconsin corrections officials recommended that he be sent to a maximum-security prison out of state because of ‘security concerns based on the publicity this case has received,’ according to his inmate classification report. Patterson also doesn’t appear on the state sex offender registry although he was ordered to register as part of his sentence.

The 22-year-old was moved on July 15 to an undisclosed prison in New Mexico. 

Patterson was previously being held at Dodge Correctional Facility, a maximum-security prison, in Waupun, Wisconsin as Inmate 680351.

Prison records from Dodge, dated from May 30, noted that a prison captain had spoken with Patterson about the possibility of moving him out of state because of security concerns. 

Patterson was sentenced to life in prison without the possibility of parole in May following the kidnapping of Jayme Closs, 13, in October. 

 

Jake Thomas Patterson (pictured in his arrest picture in January) was sentenced by a Barron County Circuit Court judge on 24 May 2019 to life in prison with no parole for kidnapping 13-year-old Jayme Closs and killing her parents in October 2018

Jake Thomas Patterson (pictured in court in May, left, and pictured in his arrest picture in January, right) was moved on July 15 to a maximum-security prison in New Mexico 

Patterson was sentenced to life in prison without the possibility of parole in May following the kidnapping of Jayme Closs, 13, in October.

Patterson, 22, killed her parents, James and Denise Closs, before abducting Jayme in Barron, Wisconsin. On October 24, the FBI offered a $25,000 reward for information leading to Jayme’s location. 

Bill Lueders, president of the Wisconsin Freedom of Information Council, said it’s outrageous for corrections officials to conceal the new facility Patterson is being kept in under the guise of protecting Patterson’s safety. He argued they can’t selectively keep information secret, particularly when they tend to disclose an inmate’s whereabouts. 

Lueders added that it’s unlikely the department found a facility where no one has heard of Patterson, given the national attention his case has received.

‘It’s not acceptable in a free society for the state to lock people up in secret locations,’ he said. ‘It’s just that simple. That’s what dictatorships do.’

Before her escape, the amount to find Jayme was doubled to $50,000 by the Jennie-O Turkey Store, which is were her parents worked. 

In January, after three months of being held captive, Jayme was found alive in Gordon, Wisconsin and Patterson was taken into custody. Patterson had tied Jayme up with tape and put her in the trunk of his car before driving to a remote cabin in Douglas County, Wisconsin about 90 days after killing her parents.   

Shown is 13-year-old Jayme Closs . Jake Thomas Patterson, 21, was sentenced on in May to life in prison with no parole for kidnapping her and killing her parent last October

Shown is 13-year-old Jayme Closs . Jake Thomas Patterson, 21, was sentenced on in May to life in prison with no parole for kidnapping her and killing her parent last October

Jayme Closs (pictured) was held captive by Jake Patterson for 88 days after he killed her parents

Jake Patterson pled guilty to killing James and Denise Closs (pictured above)

Patterson admitted to abducting Jayme for 88 days and to killing her parents, James and Denise Closs (pictured above), at the Closs family home in Barron, Wisconsin

He kept Jayme under a bed for weeks and kept without food or water before she was able to break free while he was out of the house. He pleaded guilty in March to two counts of intentional homicide and one count of kidnapping. 

The 22-year-old admitted concocting a plan to kidnap the 13-year-old girl, who he had never met, after seeing her get off a school bus near her home. 

‘Jake Patterson took a lot of things that I love away from me. It makes me the most sad that he took away my mom and my dad,’ Jayme said, through her attorney, in her first public statement after she escaped.

Jayme, who did not appear in court during Patterson’s trial, described the night her parents were killed as a ‘horrifying memory’ that has left her too scared to go out in public and unable to visit her family home.

‘There are some things that Jake Patterson can never take from me. He can’t take my freedom. He thought he could own me and he was wrong. I’m smarter. I watched his routine and I took back my freedom. I will always have my freedom and he will not,’ she said. 

Patterson was moved to an undisclosed prison after being transferred from Dodge Correctional Institution in Waupun, Wisconsin (pictured)

Patterson was moved to an undisclosed prison after being transferred from Dodge Correctional Institution in Waupun, Wisconsin (pictured) 

DailyMail.com has obtained a prison report where Jake Patterson says, 'He states the Criminal Complaint and PSI [pre-sentence investigation] were exaggerated and he doesn't know why they did that as he already admitted to everything' but 'he is not appealing the case'

DailyMail.com has obtained a prison report where Jake Patterson says, ‘He states the Criminal Complaint and PSI [pre-sentence investigation] were exaggerated and he doesn’t know why they did that as he already admitted to everything’ but ‘he is not appealing the case’

The prison report adds, 'Mr. Patterson...claimed that the Criminal Complaint and PSI was not entirely accurate. Mr. Patterson showed concern for the victim and stated he wanted to make things easier on her as far as the sentencing. He is not appealing the case. An out of state placement is recommended for security concerns based on the publcity this case has received.'

The prison report adds, ‘Mr. Patterson…claimed that the Criminal Complaint and PSI was not entirely accurate. Mr. Patterson showed concern for the victim and stated he wanted to make things easier on her as far as the sentencing. He is not appealing the case. An out of state placement is recommended for security concerns based on the publcity this case has received.’

Patterson said he had no intention to appeal his two life sentences for the murders of James Closs, 56, and his wife Denise, 46 and the abduction of Jayme. 

Patterson, who used a shotgun to kill Jayme’s parents, was described as ‘one of the most dangerous men to walk on this planet,’ by presiding judge Justice James Babler at Barron County Circuit Court, Barron, Wisconsin last month.  

Prison records dated from May 30 showed that he seemed for Jayme but showed little remorse. 

‘In regards to the victim,’ Patterson’s Inmate Classification Report continued, he ‘showed concern’ for her and yet personality assessments go onto conclude that he exhibits no guilt for the atrocities he committed in the early hours of 15 October, 2018.

The records, obtained by DailyMail.com, also reveal that an ‘agitated’ Patterson –  made claims authorities had made exaggerated and ‘not entirely accurate’ details about him. 

Prison records dated from May 30 showed that he seemed for Jayme but showed little remorse

Prison records dated from May 30 showed that he seemed for Jayme but showed little remorse

But it goes on to note that the only detail Patterson said was false was, ‘He states she [Jayme] was shocked but wasn’t crying.’

He refused to comment further but told assessors that he ‘feels fine about the sentence.’  

It reads, ‘Mr Patterson states that he doesn’t know why he did this. He states the Criminal Complaint and PSI [pre-sentence investigation] were exaggerated and he doesn’t know why they did that as he already admitted to everything.’

‘Mr Patterson stated he pled guilty because of the victim and he wanted to try to make it easier on her.’

Patterson has no history of substance abuse but told authorities that he only started drinking after he committed his heinous crimes.

The report noted, ‘He states he would drink 4 times a week, 6-7 shots of vodka. He states this started after the current offense happened, while J.L.C [Jayme Lynn Closs] was living at his house.’

Patterson held the terrified teenager in his woodland home in Gordon, Wisconsin – some 70 miles from the Closs family home in Barron.

He kept her in a small space beneath his single bed and barricaded her in with tote bags weighted down by barbell weights and free weights.

He told investigators he let her out when he was home.

Patterson’s mental health assessment reveals that he scored high on tests designed to gauge anger, criminal personality and the ability to rationalize rather than regret his actions.

Patterson took Jayme to this woodland home in Gordon, Wisconsin where he held the 13-year-old prisoner for 88 days before she was able to escape

Patterson took Jayme to this woodland home in Gordon, Wisconsin where he held the 13-year-old prisoner for 88 days before she was able to escape

Closs was held captive in this space under Patterson's bed at his woodland home in Gordon, Wisconsin. He barricaded her in with tote bags weighted down by barbell weights and free weights

Closs was held captive in this space under Patterson’s bed at his woodland home in Gordon, Wisconsin. He barricaded her in with tote bags weighted down by barbell weights and free weights

He has been assessed on both the Criminal Personality Criminogenic Scale and the Criminal Thinking Self-Report Criminogenic Scale that tests inmates’ personalities and behavior using a host of categories.

These include: impulsivity, risk-taking, restlessness and boredom, absence of guilty (callousness), selfishness and narcissism, interpersonal dominance, anger and hostility and a tendency to exploit others.

Patterson scored highly across the board and anger management classes were classified a high priority but at the time that the report was written he had yet to be assigned to any.

The scores are in sharp contradiction with Patterson’s own public profession of regret when responding to questions from a local reporter ahead of his first court appearance in March. 

Then, he claimed, ‘No one will believe or can even imagine how sorry I am for hurting Jayme this much. Can’t express it.’

At the time Jayme’s relatives dismissed the notion that the man who gunned down the Closs’s so callously and held Jayme for 88 days without apparent motive, felt any of the remorse he claimed.

And from the prison report it is now clear he has shown no real regret for the murders as he begins his life behind bars.   

TIMELINE OF JAYME CLOSS’ DISAPPEARANCE

Jayme Closs was missing for three months

Jayme Closs was missing for three months

Oct. 15, 2018 – Jayme’s parents, James and Denise Closs, found dead at their home in Barron and the teen is reported missing

Oct. 16, 2018 – Investigators say they don’t consider Jayme a suspect in her parents’ deaths

Oct. 17, 2018 – Authorities announce that investigators believe Jayme was in her family’s home when he parents were fatally shot

Oct. 18, 2018 – About 100 people join a ground search for Jayme after Barron County Sheriff Chris Fitzgerald requests the help of volunteers

 Oct. 23, 2018 – About 2,000 volunteers from as far as Minneapolis help with another ground search . Several items are found and taken for assessment

Oct. 24, 2018 – The FBI offers a $25,000 reward for information leading to Jayme’s location. The amount is later doubled to $50,000 by the Jennie-O Turkey Store, where James and Denise Closs worked

Oct. 27, 2018 – Funeral held for James and Denise Closs 

Oct. 29, 2018 – Prosecutors announce they have charged a man with burglarizing the Closs home but say he’s not a suspect in the case. 

Dec. 12, 2018 – Tree of Hope lit as community prays for her safe return

Jan. 10, 2019 – After three months Jayme is found alive in Gordon, Wisconsin. A suspect is taken into custody. 

Jan. 11, 2019 – Police named the man accused of kidnapping her as Jake Thomas Patterson, 21 

 

Read more at DailyMail.co.uk


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