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Japanese teens abandons his attempt to hitchhike across America after being picked up by police

A Japanese teenager has abandoned his attempt to hitchhike across America after he suffered racial abuse and was even picked up by police.

The high school student, who goes by Chubo Rei on Twitter, was planning to start off in California and end on the east coast, reported The Japan Times.

The 15-year-old, who has nearly 8,000 followers, even created the hashtag #ChuboReiacrossAmerica so people could watch his journey. 

Japanese teenager Chubo Rei (pictured in Santa Monica, California) abandoned his attempt to hitchhike across America after he suffered racial abuse and was even picked up by police

The 15-year-old arrived in the US on February 4 and decided that the first leg of his trip would be to travel from Hollywood to Pasadena in Los Angeles

The 15-year-old arrived in the US on February 4 and decided that the first leg of his trip would be to travel from Hollywood to Pasadena in Los Angeles

This was not Rei’s first hitchhiking attempt. He’d already done this in at least three regions of Japan. 

Rei arrived in the US on February 4 and decided that the first leg of his trip would be to travel from Hollywood to Pasadena in Los Angeles, according to The Japan Times.

He said that while most Americans are ‘friendly people’, America is less responsive to professional hitchhikers than Japan is and that he got plenty of awkward stares.

Then, just five days into his trip on February 9, he was picked up by police, although in which city is unclear.

‘[They were] surprised when I talked about age or [why] I was traversing across the US,’ he wrote on Twitter.

However, he was let go after officers called his parents and confirmed his story.

The Japan Times reported that posts on Twitter became so much infrequent that, on February 12, Rei had to tweet out that he was still alive.

Users became increasingly worried about Rei. One user sent him a map of where hitchhiking is illegal in the US and another contacted the Las Vegas Japanese Consulate to get him help.

He said that while most Americans are 'friendly people', America is less responsive to professional hitchhikers than Japan is and that he got plenty of awkward stares. Pictured: Rei along US Route 66 in Las Vegas

He said that while most Americans are ‘friendly people’, America is less responsive to professional hitchhikers than Japan is and that he got plenty of awkward stares. Pictured: Rei along US Route 66 in Las Vegas

Then ,just five days into his trip on February 9, he was picked up by police, although in which city is unclear. Pictured: Rei, right, in Las Vegas

On February 15, Rei ended up at a youth protection center in Las Vegas, although it is unclear how and he decided to go home. Pictured: Rei, right, in Santa Monica

Then, just five days into his trip on February 9, he was picked up by police, although in which city is unclear. On February 15, Rei ended up at a youth protection center in Las Vegas, although it is unclear how and he decided to go home. Pictured: Rei in Las Vegas, left, and in Santa Monica, right 

Many of his followers back home in Japan tweeted at him, advising him to return home because it was too dangerous. 

On February 15, Rei ended up at a youth protection center in Las Vegas, although it is unclear how.

Later that day he tweeted that he would be ending his adventure and heading back to Japan.

Rei said, however, that his main reason for cutting his trip is because it is illegal to travel alone under the age of 18 in the US.

He said his father came and got him and the two returned home.

Hitchhiking seems like a forgotten art in many ways. It was much more common pre-1960s and is now perceived as dangerous.

David Smith, a British sociologist who has studied hitchhiking trends, told Vox that there is a simple explanation for its decline.    

‘Probably the most important thing is the huge growth we’ve seen in car ownership,’ he said.

According to the 2013 National Report on Commuting Patterns and Trends, the number of zero-vehicle households has decreased while multi-vehicle ownership has increases – therefore making hitchhiking less necessary.

The report showed that in 1960 most households owned one vehicle. By the mid-1980s, up to the present day, most households own at least two cars. 



Read more at DailyMail.co.uk


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