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Jeopardy! contestant confuses Babe Ruth for Jackie Robinson

Jeopardy! contestant mistakes Babe Ruth for Jackie Robinson after being asked to name the MLB player who ‘broke the color barrier in 1947’

  • USC student, Xiaoke Ying, mistook Babe Ruth for Jackie Robinson on Jeopardy!  
  • Host Alex Trebek read: ‘One of the topics covered in the Major League Baseball course at the Arizona State is this player who broke the color barrier in 1947’
  • Ying was the first to hit the buzzer and said: ‘Who is Babe Ruth?’ 

A Jeopardy! contestant was left red-faced after confusing Babe Ruth for Jackie Robinson on an episode that aired Wednesday night.

In a clip from the episode, Alex Trebek is heard reading: ‘One of the topics covered in the Major League Baseball course at the Arizona State is this player who broke the color barrier in 1947.’

University of Southern California student, Xiaoke Ying was the first to hit the buzzer and said: ‘Who is Babe Ruth?’

Trebek quickly replied ‘nope’ before Ying’s rival and Yale student, Nathaniel Miller, buzzed in and answered: ‘Who is Jackie Robinson?’

Jeopardy! contestant, Xiaoke Ying was left red-faced after confusing Babe Ruth for Jackie Robinson on an episode that aired Wednesday night

In a clip from the episode, Alex Trebek is heard reading: 'One of the topics covered in the Major League Baseball course at the Arizona State is this player who broke the color barrier in 1947.' Ying said: 'Who is Babe Ruth?' Her rival Nathaniel Miller (left) responded with the right answer

In a clip from the episode, Alex Trebek is heard reading: ‘One of the topics covered in the Major League Baseball course at the Arizona State is this player who broke the color barrier in 1947.’ Ying said: ‘Who is Babe Ruth?’ Her rival Nathaniel Miller (left) responded with the right answer

The mix-up occurred during the third semifinal round of the College Tournament and was a $1,000 clue under the ‘unique college courses’ category.

And to make matters worse, the episode aired on April 15, which was declared Jackie Robinson Day in 2005 and has occurred annually ever since. 

Robinson will forever be known for enduring vehement racism during the late 1940s and early 1950s. 

After being signed by Dodgers general manager Branch Rickey, Robinson famously agreed to ‘turn the other cheek’ for the first five years of his professional career. 

That meant ignoring everything from dirty slides, bad calls, and racial epithets from players, fans and umpires.

‘Plenty of times I wanted to haul off when somebody insulted me for the color of my skin, but I had to hold to myself,’ he once told a reporter. ‘I knew I was kind of an experiment. The whole thing was bigger than me.’

Robinson  (pictured) will forever be known for enduring vehement racism during the late 1940s and early 1950s

And while Babe Ruth (pictured) is a baseball legend in his own right, he wasn't responsible for breaking the color barrier in the sport

Robinson (left) will forever be known for enduring vehement racism during the late 1940s and early 1950s. And while Babe Ruth (right) is a baseball legend in his own right, he wasn’t responsible for breaking the color barrier in the sport

The former Brooklyn Dodgers second baseman (right) became not only a baseball legend when he integrated the sport in 1947, but he will always be known as an American civil rights hero

The former Brooklyn Dodgers second baseman (right) became not only a baseball legend when he integrated the sport in 1947, but he will always be known as an American civil rights hero

The former Brooklyn Dodgers player not only became a baseball legend when he integrated the sport in 1947, but he will always be known as an American civil rights hero.

Despite the mishap, Ying defeated Miller and sophomore Marshall Comeaux of the University of Texas at Austin, to advance to the final round of the College Tournament.

And even though Ying won, that didn’t stop Twitter users from voicing their opinions about the mix-up. 

One tweet from Starting 9 read: ‘AND ON HIS DAY NO LESS.’  

‘Babe Ruth is like the default answer for anyone uneducated about baseball,’ another user tweeted.

A third wrote: ‘Imagine thinking Babe Ruth broke the color barrier.’

‘That’s almost as bad as not knowing who MLK Jr is,’ another person said.  

And even though Ying won, that didn't stop Twitter users from voicing their opinions about the mix-up

And even though Ying won, that didn’t stop Twitter users from voicing their opinions about the mix-up

Read more at DailyMail.co.uk