News, Culture & Society

Kellyanne Conway revealed to be latest White House official to vote by mail

Kellyanne Conway voted by mail-in ballot in the 2018 midterm elections in New Jersey, despite asserting Wednesday that voters should show up in person to cast their ballots in the midst of the coronavirus pandemic.

Even though the White House counselor and her anti-Trump husband, George Conway, own a home in northern New Jersey, she did not travel back to Bergen County on November 6, 2018 to cast her ballot, the Huffington Post reported on Thursday.

According to the Bergen County supervisor of elections, Conway cast her votes through a mail-in ballot.

Recently, President Donald Trump has gone on the attack against having the 2020 elections take place fully through the mail – he claims there is more potential for fraud and believes the set-up would disproportionately benefit Democrats.

Conway explained to the Huffington Post, however, that she only voted by mail because she had to cast an absentee ballot since she currently works, and has a temporary residence, hundreds of miles away from her permanent residence and where she casts her vote.

‘That’s called an absentee ballot. One completes it and posts it by U.S. Mail,’ Conway described in a written response. ‘Don’t confuse it with a (non-absentee) ‘mail-in ballot’ to serve your purposes.’

White House Counselor Kellyanne Conway voted by mail-in ballot in the 2018 midterm elections – even though she asserted Wednesday that people should wait in line to vote in-person rather than going to a fully mail-in voting structure in the midst of the coronavirus pandemic

'I mean, they wait in line for a Georgetown Cupcake for an hour, to get a cupcake,' Conway said in claiming people should wait in line to vote in-person. The boutique designer cupcake location in the Georgetown neighborhood of Washington, D.C. usually has a line that spans a half-block

‘I mean, they wait in line for a Georgetown Cupcake for an hour, to get a cupcake,’ Conway said in claiming people should wait in line to vote in-person. The boutique designer cupcake location in the Georgetown neighborhood of Washington, D.C. usually has a line that spans a half-block

Pictured: a vacant Georgetown Cupcakes as the location has been closed during the outbreak

Pictured: a vacant Georgetown Cupcakes as the location has been closed during the outbreak

Trump has claimed mail-in ballots lead to more instances of fraud as Democrats push for the 2020 elections to be held fully by mail to avoid crowding at polling places as the outbreak continues

Trump has claimed mail-in ballots lead to more instances of fraud as Democrats push for the 2020 elections to be held fully by mail to avoid crowding at polling places as the outbreak continues

New Jersey is a state where residents do not have to prove a need for an absentee ballot.

New Jersey Division of Election records also indicate that the 2018 midterm elections was the first time Conway voted by mail instead of in person, further indicating she did so since she is working at the White House.

Trump, and his administration, have been clear that they are not against absentee voting for a reason, but are opposed to forcing a fully mail-in voting structure to accommodate for the coronavirus outbreak.

Democrats are pushing for the idea, and California even passed a measure where all registered voters in the state will receive a ballot in the mail for the November elections.

On Wednesday, Conway compared the safety aspects of standing in line to cast your vote to standing in line for a high-end cupcake in the Georgetown neighborhood of Washington, D.C.

‘I mean, they wait in line for a Georgetown Cupcake for an hour, to get a cupcake,’ Trump’s counselor told reporters at the White House. ‘So, I think they can probably wait in line to do something as consequential and critical and constitutionally significant as cast their ballot.’

Trump voted by mail in the Florida presidential primary election in March, citing that his duties as president prevented him from casting his ballot in person.

The president, a life-long New Yorker, made his Mar-a-Lago home in Palm Beach, Florida his permanent residence last year.

His newest press secretary, Kayleigh McEnany, also voted by mail in Florida in March and every single other election she has participated in since 2010 – even though she has also decried mail-in voting yielding a high potential for fraud.

In the last 10 years, McEnany has voted by mail 11 times.

She also pointed out to DailyMail.com the difference between Democrats pushing for a sweeping mail-in structure and those requesting to vote absentee.

‘Absentee voting has the word absent in it for a reason. It means you’re absent from the jurisdiction or unable to vote in person,’ she said in a statement. ‘President Trump is against the Democrat plan to politicize the coronavirus and expand mass mail-in voting without a reason, which has a high propensity for voter fraud. This is a simple distinction that the media fails to grasp.’

Trump faced repercussions from Twitter after making two posts related to mail-in voting after California decided to send all voters ballots through the mail.

‘There is NO WAY (ZERO!) that Mail-In Ballots will be anything less than substantially fraudulent,’ Trump wrote in a post this week. ‘Mail boxes will be robbed, ballots will be forged & even illegally printed out & fraudulently signed.’

The two-tweet thread earned the president his first-ever ‘misleading’ fact-check warning from Twitter.

White House press secretary Kayleigh McEnany votes absentee in Florida elections

President Donald Trump and first lady Melania Trump, seen Wednesday leaving to watch the SpaceX launch in Florida, also vote absentee in Florida

White House press secretary Kayleigh McEnany (left) has voted absentee in the last 11 elections she has participated in over the last 10 years  and Donald Trump (right) voted bymail in the March primary in Florida

The social media sites put blue exclamation points at the bottom of each tweet prompting users to click on the link to ‘get the facts about mail-in ballots.’

It then redirects Twitter users to a page asserting the president’s claims are unsubstantiated and sharing several news articles that reiterate that point. It also has a bullet list of things it claims are ‘false’ in Trump’s tweets.

On Tuesday, the same day he tweeted and the flags were issued on the tweets, Trump said Twitter was trying to ‘stifle free speech,’ is ‘totally silencing conservative voices’ and attempting to interfere in the 2020 elections.

Twitter CEO Jack Dorsey stood by the decision to flag the tweets.

This prompted Trump to sign an executive order on Thursday that will open up social media sites, like Twitter and Facebook, to more lawsuits, specifically in regards to bias.

Two Republican lawmakers, Florida Representative Matt Gaetz and Missouri Senator Josh Hawley, announced separately they are working on legislation that would get rid of certain federal protections for social media sites.

This includes Section 230 of the Communications Decency Act, which essentially distinguishes social media platforms from publishers and protects them from being sued for what users post.

Read more at DailyMail.co.uk