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Kyle Edmund poised to become British No1

Britain’s new tennis sensation Kyle Edmund roared into the Australian Open semi-final and is now poised to overtake Andy Murray in the rankings.

Nicknamed ‘Kedders’, the Yorkshireman stunned the sporting world with a shock win against World Number 3 Grigor Dimitrov – Nicole Sherzinger’s boyfriend. 

The 23-year-old is now on course to leapfrog Murray, who is out injured, to become the new British No1 – but needs to reach the final first.

The victory in Melbourne means he will take home at least £509,000 – adding to his career earnings of £1.5million.

His sister, Kelly, 21, celebrated her big brother’s amazing victory by retweeting various pictures and videos of the moment he beat Dimitrov, with one tweet branding him ‘King Kyle’. 

Kyle Edmund has beaten Grigor Dimitrov to reach the Australian Open semi-finals

The British No 2 put on a stunning display in Melbourne to see off the Bulgarian

The British No 2 put on a stunning display in Melbourne to see off the Bulgarian

Edmund with his younger sister Kelly, while they were pupils at Pocklington prep school

Edmund while training with British tennis as a young boy

Left, Edmund with his younger sister Kelly, while they were pupils at Pocklington prep school and right, during his training a as a youngster

Edmund's family said they were 'proud' of his 'efforts and application' over the past 12 years

Edmund’s family said they were ‘proud’ of his ‘efforts and application’ over the past 12 years

Speaking after the game, he said: ‘Its an amazing feeling, very happy, with these things you are so emotionally engaged you don’t really take it in.

‘I’m just trying to enjoy the moment. It was my first match on this court, very special.  

‘It’s great, thinking about it I will be proud at some point. Reaching the last stages of one of the biggest tournaments is very pleasing but I want to go further. 

‘It comes with the territory, the better you do the more attention you get. There’s been more attention on me, you take it in your stride but it’s a good problem to have.’

He is being hailed as Britain’s ‘new Andy Murray’ but rising tennis star Edmund may never have taken up the sport had it not been for his mother.

The middle-class Yorkshire boy, nicknamed ‘Kedders’, joked how he first went to tennis lessons because he was ‘probably annoying his mother’ Denise and she ‘just wanted him to do something’. 

He was so shy as a teen that his friends ordered for him at restaurants.

But now a series of surprise victories in Melbourne has seen Edmund burst onto the world stage – earning plaudits from stars including Rafael Nadal.

Edmund in action during his Boys Singles match against American Raymond Sarmiento at Wimbledon in 2010

Edmund in action during his Boys Singles match against American Raymond Sarmiento at Wimbledon in 2010

Edmund (far right) claps as Britain's Dominic Inglot holds up the Davis Cup trophy next to captain Leon Smith, Andy Murray, Jamie Murray in 2015

Edmund (far right) claps as Britain’s Dominic Inglot holds up the Davis Cup trophy next to captain Leon Smith, Andy Murray, Jamie Murray in 2015

Edmund caused an upset as the world No 3 crashed out of the first Grand Slam of the year

Edmund caused an upset as the world No 3 crashed out of the first Grand Slam of the year

'I managed to break him, held my nerve and prayed that last ball was out,' said Edmund

‘I managed to break him, held my nerve and prayed that last ball was out,’ said Edmund

 Edmund's previous matches with Dimitrov had gone to deciding sets, but this did not require it

 Edmund’s previous matches with Dimitrov had gone to deciding sets, but this did not require it

But for the mild mannered sportsman, from the village of Tickton, this has been a long journey of hard work and dedication.

Born in Johannesburg in 1995, he moved to east Yorkshire at three when his parents Steven, 49, and Denise, 50.   

Keen for her children to be active, Denise ferried them to and from David Lloyd Racquet and Fitness Club in Hull every Saturday morning.

But at the age of 10 her son preferred cricket and swimming, not tennis.  

Edmund told the Daily Express: ‘My mum said to me, ”I’ve booked you in for some tennis lessons on Saturdays as well”. It was only an hour a week I used to do.

‘But that’s how it started. Mum, I don’t know, just wanted me to do something because I was probably annoying her.’  

Kyle Edmund as a Junior Davis Cup winner in 2011,

Edmund, with his father Steven, mother Denise,  and 21-year-old sister Kelly at her graduation

Left, Kyle Edmund, as a Junior Davis Cup winner in 2011, and as a 23-year-old with with his mother, Denise

A bright youngster, Edmund went to Beverley Grammar School before forming part of the British team that won the Junior Davis Cup for the first time in 2011.

By the age of 17 he was enrolled at the Lawn Tennis Association’s elite training centre in London, returning to his family’s £350,000 home at the weekend.

In 2015, Edmund was part of the team that delivered Britain’s first Davis Cup victory in 79 years.

He is ranked 49th in the world and number two in Britain, thanks in part to his particularly powerful forehand and much-improved serve.

Edmund now stands on the verge of entering Britain’s tennis hall of fame – after reaching the semi finals of the Open.

Murray is the only other British player to do so, since John Lloyd in 1985.  

However, while his confidence and talent is winning him a legion of expectant fans, his personality off the court could not be more different.

Edmund (far right) claps as Britain's Dominic Inglot holds up the Davis Cup trophy next to captain Leon Smith, Andy Murray, Jamie Murray in 2015

Edmund (far right) claps as Britain’s Dominic Inglot holds up the Davis Cup trophy next to captain Leon Smith, Andy Murray, Jamie Murray in 2015

When he was first selected for the Davis Cup squad, as a teenager in 2014, he was known to be so shy that teammates ordered for him at restaurants.

His success is an immense source of pride for his company director father Steven, mother Denise, who runs a small payroll business, and 21-year-old sister Kelly.

His father said: ‘We are very proud, not necessarily about his achievements this week, but more with his efforts and application over the last 12 years. It’s great that he is maturing into a wonderful young man, enjoying his tennis and seeing the results this year.’

AUSTRALIAN OPEN PRIZE MONEY 

Winner – £2.32m

Runner-up – £1.16m

Semi-finalist – £509,000

Quarter-finalist – £255,000

Fourth round – £139,000

Third round – £82,000

Second round – £52,000

First round – £29,000 

Standing well over 6ft with broad shoulders, his power and precision with a racket is catching the attention of the sport’s biggest stars, including Nadal.  

Edmund pushed the Spaniard hard when they met at the Monte Carlo Open in April last year, having a break point to pull ahead of him in a deciding set at a tournament he usually dominates.

‘Oh, he’s good. He’s a good player, and for me it’s not a surprise,’ said Nadal, when asked about the Englishman’s success in Australia.

He added: ‘It’s a normal thing for me. Was a little bit more surprising for me last year Kyle lost a lot of close matches, I think. But, no, I really believe in his potential.

‘He has a huge serve, huge forehand, and he hit very strong the ball, no? So I really think he’s going to have a great year.’      

With an agonising delay, Hawk-Eye adjudicated in Edmund’s favour on match point to put him into the Australian Open semi-final with victory over world No 3 Dimitrov.

It ruled that the Bulgarian’s last backhand had gone long by a few millimetres, and Edmund had completed a 6-4, 3-6, 6-3, 6-4 victory over the winner of November’s ATP Finals in London. 

Edmund also paid tribute to the team behind his rise: ‘My game style is obviously an aggressive one. 

‘A number of times last year I was playing OK but came unstuck a few times too often in close stages, so we tried to really think what’s going to make the difference. Fidde (Rosengren) is involved but also Mark Hilton back home. 

‘They work together. Of course I’ve also been together with my trainer Ian Prangley a long time, so I’m really happy for the team around me. So far it’s going well.’ 

Edmund tore into the Bulgarian with his forehand right from the off and immediately broke

Edmund tore into the Bulgarian with his forehand right from the off and immediately broke

Dimitrov settled down more in the second, looking at his box less anxiously than before

Dimitrov settled down more in the second, looking at his box less anxiously than before

After that wobble, however, he showed resolve to break back immediately in the final set

After that wobble, however, he showed resolve to break back immediately in the final set

Britain's Davis Cup captain Leon Smith celebrates after Edmund's win against Dimitrov

Britain’s Davis Cup captain Leon Smith celebrates after Edmund’s win against Dimitrov



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