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LinkedIn finds women don’t sell themselves as well as men

When was the last time you gave your LinkedIn profile some love? 

If the answer is a while, now might be the time to update and refine it. 

New research by the business social networking service found that women do not promote themselves as much as men on the site – and it’s costing them jobs as a result.

New research by the business social networking service has found that women do not promote themselves as much as men on the site (stock image)

LinkedIn found that while women have shorter profiles than men, they will also include 'eleven per cent fewer skills than men on their LinkedIn profile' (stock image)

LinkedIn found that while women have shorter profiles than men, they will also include ‘eleven per cent fewer skills than men on their LinkedIn profile’ (stock image)

After analysing some 141 million profiles, LinkedIn found that while women have shorter profiles than men, males also ‘tend to skew their professional brands to highlight more senior-level experience, often removing junior-level roles altogether’.

The average woman includes ‘eleven per cent fewer skills than men on their LinkedIn profile, even at similar occupations and experience levels’.

Meanwhile, the most applied-for roles for men include software engineer, project manager and business analyst, whereas for women it is administrative or executive assistant, followed by project manager and account manager.

In order to boost your profile on LinkedIn, the key is to invest time - 'Invest time in actively posting,' the Country Manager for LinkedIn Australia and New Zealand said (stock image)

In order to boost your profile on LinkedIn, the key is to invest time – ‘Invest time in actively posting,’ the Country Manager for LinkedIn Australia and New Zealand said (stock image)

So how can you boost your profile and build your brand on LinkedIn?

According to the Country Manager for LinkedIn Australia and New Zealand, Matt Tindale, the key is to invest some time.

‘Invest time in actively posting,’ he said. ‘Don’t just share articles, but add your thoughts and commentary to what is being discussed and liken it to your experience or brand.’

Then, make sure you have an ‘authentic perspective’.

‘If you are passionate about topics that matter to you, share your perspective,’ the expert continued.

You can also 'nurture your network' by engaging in 'meaningful conversations and sharing insightful information' (stock image)

You can also ‘nurture your network’ by engaging in ‘meaningful conversations and sharing insightful information’ (stock image)

Finally, ‘nurture your network’ by engaging in ‘meaningful conversations and sharing insightful information’.

You could also add more skills to your profile and make it longer as a whole – to reflect those of many men from the research.

LinkedIn Australia recently shared the most viewed profiles in the Australian fashion industry – the Power Profiles 2017 list.

These include the founder and CEO of Showpo, Jane Lu, the CEO of the Iconic, Patrick Schmidt and the CEO of Cotton On, Peter Johnson, among others.

For more information about the Power Profiles, click here

Read more at DailyMail.co.uk


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