News, Culture & Society

Lisa Wilkinson left fuming after ’embarrassing’ airport pat down as other women share horror stories

Lisa Wilkinson has been left fuming after the metal underwire in her bra showed up during an airport scan, prompting an ’embarrassing’ public pat down. 

The TV host took to Twitter on Thursday to share her ‘inappropriate’ experience prompting dozens of women to come forward with their own security screening horror stories. 

‘At Brisbane Airport & Adelaide Airport the scan showed up the underwire in my bra & zip on my jeans & I had to have a full pat-down in both areas,’ Wilkinson tweeted. 

‘Embarrassing, uncomfortable, inappropriate & should be fixed.’

Lisa Wilkinson (pictured in 2019) has been left fuming after an airport scan found metal underwire in her bra prompting an ’embarrassing’ public pat down

The TV host took to Twitter to complain about the 'inappropriate' experience prompting dozens of women to share their own security screening horror stories

The TV host took to Twitter to complain about the ‘inappropriate’ experience prompting dozens of women to share their own security screening horror stories

Her tweet came just hours after ABC journalist Louise Milligan shared her own ‘uncomfortable’ experience while using the new full-body scan machines.  

‘I’m at Sydney Airport & new full-body security screening was made to take off fitted business jacket (only had little camisole underneath),’ Milligan wrote.

‘Have never had this happen anywhere. Man in front, in big bulky jumper, not made to change. It was embarrassing, uncomfortable, creepy. 

‘I mentioned to lovely Qantas staff & they were incensed & said they have had multiple women complaining of similar security heavy-handedness this week. 

‘They said a woman was crying after being forced to remove her t-shirt. They’ve complained to airport managers.’

The journalist’s experience was quickly backed-up by other women who encouraged her to make a formal complaint or record the experience next time. 

ABC reporter Louise Milligan (pictured) took to Twitter to share details of an 'uncomfortable' experience she had while using the new full-body scan machines at Sydney Airport

ABC reporter Louise Milligan (pictured) took to Twitter to share details of an ‘uncomfortable’ experience she had while using the new full-body scan machines at Sydney Airport

Her experience was quickly backed-up by other women who encouraged Milligan to make a formal complaint or record the experience next time (pictured is her tweet)

Her experience was quickly backed-up by other women who encouraged Milligan to make a formal complaint or record the experience next time (pictured is her tweet)

Milligan said the male staff had asked her to take the jacket off because the 'new full-body scanner wouldn't be able to scan properly' (pictured is her tweet)

Milligan said the male staff had asked her to take the jacket off because the ‘new full-body scanner wouldn’t be able to scan properly’ (pictured is her tweet)

The journalist said the male staff had asked her to take the fitted jacket off because the ‘new full-body scanner wouldn’t be able to scan properly’. 

Milligan also replied to Wilkinson’s tweet and described her experience as ‘gross’. 

‘Is all this on surveillance camera? Meaning, is it building up a library of footage that could be misused?’ one woman asked. 

‘Can a formal complaint be made to the regulator AND the AFP? This is absolutely scandalous. We are too compliant & co-operative.’

‘So sorry this happened to you and I cant’t believe a lady had to take her t-shirt off, that’s appalling!’ another wrote. 

‘Bloody ridiculous! They would have had to hold me down and take my jacket off. No way – so so rude!’ another woman agreed. 

Milligan (pictured in March, 2021) said when she complained to Qantas staff she was told a woman had been left in tears after she was asked by staff to remove her t-shirt

Milligan (pictured in March, 2021) said when she complained to Qantas staff she was told a woman had been left in tears after she was asked by staff to remove her t-shirt

Milligan also responded to Wilkinson's tweet and described her experience as 'gross'.

Milligan also responded to Wilkinson’s tweet and described her experience as ‘gross’. 

‘Could it be jackets in particular that require removal for some reason such as pockets or padding?’ a user asked.

‘No they told me it was because it was too loose. It’s not loose. It’s fitted. I pointed out the loose, bulky jumper and they had nothing,’ Milligan replied.  

‘I had this happen at Melbourne airport recently. I was wearing a t-shirt with a white unbuttoned shirt over the top and was asked to take my shirt off,’ another shared. 

‘I was alone and it felt so weird.’

‘Their reasoning is so arbitrary. I imagine this happens a lot. I’m sure many have noticed what appears to be a misuse of power whilst waiting in line,’ one man said. 

Sydney Airport later apologised to the journalist in the Twitter thread. 

‘Louise, we are really sorry this happened and are urgently following it up with our security contractor. Thank you for bringing it to our attention. If you have further details, please send us a DM,’ the account wrote. 

‘Thank you for replying. They were rude and, frankly, sexist,’ Milligan replied. 

‘I felt humiliated. And yes, I will DM.’

Sydney Airport's 'Passenger screening process' expectations states 'bulky outer wear clothing' like coats or jackets must be removed (pictured, a woman undergoes a full-body scan)

Sydney Airport’s ‘Passenger screening process’ expectations states ‘bulky outer wear clothing’ like coats or jackets must be removed (pictured, a woman undergoes a full-body scan)

Sydney Airport’s ‘Passenger screening process’ expectations found on their website states ‘bulky outer wear clothing’ like coats or jackets must be removed. 

The same rules apply for hats and jewellery. 

The Department of Home Affairs website states that while the federal government has set standards for aviation security screening, it is the responsibility of airports, airlines and contractors to uphold standards.

‘Security seem to be giving a pass to men with bulky jackets, yet a fitted jacket for women is an issue,’ another Twitter user suggested.

***
Read more at DailyMail.co.uk