News, Culture & Society

Louisville cops must turn over radio recordings during raid that killed Breonna Taylor, judge rules

A judge has ordered that all radio call recordings from the police raid that led to the death of Breonna Taylor be released to her family as part of a wrongful death suit filed against the city of Louisville. 

Taylor, a 26-year-old EMT, was shot dead at her apartment on Springfield Avenue on March 13, during a botched no-knock search warrant served on the property.

Jefferson Circuit Court Judge Judith McDonald-Burkman made the ruling Wednesday after an attorney for the family argued that a closer review of the recordings could help clarify details in the case. 

Attorneys for the city had argued that the family’s lawyers were engaging in a ‘fishing expedition’.

But family attorney Sam Aguiar said there has been confusion over which officers actually participated in the raid and whether body camera footage of the incident exists.

Taylor, a 26-yearr-old EMT, was shot dead at her apartment on Springfield Avenue on March 13, during a botched, no-knock search warrant served on the property 

A bullet hole is pictured in one of the windows of Taylor's apartment that was shot during the police raid that led to her death

A bullet hole is pictured in the siding of Taylor's apartment

A judge ordered Wednesday that all radio call recordings related to the police raid that led to the death of Taylor be released to her family as part of a wrongful death suit filed against the city of Louisville. Pictured are bullet holes left from when cops entered the apartment

Taylor was asleep at the residence she shared with her boyfriend Kenneth Walker when officers burst into their home just before 1am.

Louisville police claim they identified themselves before using a battering ram to enter Taylor’s home, where she and her boyfriend were in bed. 

Taylor’s neighbors and her family dispute this. They said police never identified themselves, and that Walker, who was legally allowed to carry a firearm, shot at the cops thinking that he was being robbed.

Police responded with gunfire, killing Taylor, who suffered eight gunshot wounds.

The warrant to search her home was in connection with a suspect who did not live there and no drugs were found.

The death of Breonna Taylor during a no-knock search warrant in Louisville, Kentucky, was the result of a police operation to clear out her neighborhood for a gentrification project, her family claims.

Taylor (pictured) at the time she was shot dead shared her residence with her current boyfriend Kenneth Walker

Walker was arrested and charged with first-degree assault and attempted murder of a police officer after Sgt. Jonathan Mattingly was shot in the leg during the raid. The charges were later dropped.

Mattingly was with officers Brett Hankison and Myles Cosgrove during the raid.

Hankison, 44, was later fired after it was found he violated department policies by ‘blindly’ firing 10 rounds into Taylor’s home during the incident. The two other cops have been placed on administrative reassignment.

The two other cops have been placed on administrative reassignment. 

The family’s lawsuit names all three cops involved.

Court filings show that attorneys for the family believe there were cops who participated in the raid who were not identified by the city, and who should have been outfitted with body cameras, WDRB reported.

‘We’ve identified a few officers that were at least supposed to be on scene that always wear body cameras,’ Aguiar said in court on Wednesday. 

Attorneys for the defense fired back that that the family’s attorneys were engaging in a ‘fishing expedition’. 

Former Officer Brett Hankison, 44, was fired after it was found he violated department policies by 'blindly' firing 10 rounds into Taylor's home during the botched no-knock search warrant

Former cop Brett Hankison (right) was fired for the fatal shooting of Taylor after it was found he violated department policies by ‘blindly’ firing 10 rounds into the woman’s home during the incident

Pictured is the broken door jam from Taylor's apartment after police executed their no-knock search warrant on the residence

Pictured is the broken door jam from Taylor’s apartment after police executed their no-knock search warrant on the residence

‘If we can narrow the focus, I think we will be fine,’ Assistant Jefferson County Attorney Peter Ervin told McDonald-Burkman on behalf of the city.

The judge disagreed the request was asking for too much and said the family could have access to recordings going as far back as four hours before the raid and until 3.pm the next day when the shooting scene was cleared.  

Attention on the death of Taylor, a black woman, heightened after George Floyd was killed in Minneapolis on Memorial Day. 

The black 46-year-old father of five died during an arrest after a white police officer pressed his knee against the man’s neck for close to nine minutes. Former cop Derek Chauvin lost his job after the slaying and has been charged with Floyd’s murder.

The death of Floyd also triggered protests across the US and calls from the Black Lives Matter movement for an end to police brutality and systematic racism. 

Read more at DailyMail.co.uk