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MAFS Martha Kalifatidis sparks $12,000 sell out of Dreamiskin dermaplaning blades

The millennial founders of a fledgling Australian beauty brand have made $12,000 overnight from their cult skincare product.

Melbourne couple Darnelle Echazar, 21, Brandon Moncur, 23, in August 2020 launched Dreamiskin, a company selling cosmetic razors that leave the face silky soft by shaving off tiny hairs and dead skin cells.

The sustainable blades with an easy-grip handle have been flying out of stock since Married At First Sight star Martha Kalifatidis promoted it on Instagram. 

Over 400 pre-orders have been placed after the 32-year-old starred in a video uploaded to the brand’s account, which shows her scraping ‘peach fuzz’ from her complexion.

The blades leave the face silky soft by shaving off tiny hairs and dead skin cells

Married At First Sight star Martha Kalifatidis (left) sparked a sell out of Dreamiskin’s $25.99 facial razors (right) after promoting them on Instagram

Melbourne couple Darnelle Echazar, 21, and Brandon Moncur. 23, who launched Dreamiskin in August 2020

Melbourne couple Darnelle Echazar, 21, and Brandon Moncur. 23, who launched Dreamiskin in August 2020

Ms Echazar, a criminal justice student, previously told Daily Mail Australia about the inspiration for the business, which typically takes in an average of $15,000 a month.

She said she was tired of hearing horror stories about cheap home dermaplaning, a treatment that is supposed to skim ‘peach fuzz’ without any pain but causes burns and irritation when performed with a poor quality blade.

Together with her crane operator boyfriend, she sourced a sustainable model with an easy-grip handle and safe but effective blade which they launched online during Covid lockdown in late August.

‘We couldn’t possibly have conceived the success and learning we have already had,’ Ms Echazar said.

Melbourne couple Darnelle Echazar and Brandon Moncur are making $15,000 a month selling eco-friendly cosmetic razors

The razors (pictured) are made from wheat straw - a biodegradable alternative to the cocktail of plastic that razors are typically made from

Melbourne couple Darnelle Echazar and Brandon Moncur are making $15,000 a month selling eco-friendly cosmetic razors (pictured)

Their brand, Dreamiskin, is based on $25.99 three-packs of sustainable facial razors made from wheat straw – a biodegradable alternative to the cocktail of plastic that razors are typically made from.

Professional dermaplaning at a skin clinic will set you back between $150 and $200.

But so long as you’re careful, the same result can be achieved with an over-the-counter facial razor like Dreamiskin for a fraction of that price.

Disposable cosmetic razors are sold in chemists like Priceline for as little as $10, and from Dreamiskin’s website the cost is even less, working out at just $8.66 a piece.

As Ms Echazar points out, ‘not all women can afford to spend upwards of $100 on a single treatment’, especially in the midst of a pandemic that has put hundreds of thousands out of work.

Described as 'the ultimate pain-free beauty tool', the razor (pictured) claims to exfoliate skin, create a seamless base for makeup

Described as ‘the ultimate pain-free beauty tool’, the razor (pictured) claims to exfoliate skin, create a seamless base for makeup

Sales of dermaplaning tools skyrocketed during lockdown, with Priceline reporting record sales of Revlon’s $9.95 Face Defuzzer in particular.

Beauty journalist Zoe Foster Blake has raved about the benefits of face shaving on Instagram, confirming it exfoliates, brightens, evens skin tone and makes skin ‘freakishly smooth’.

And while the cosmetic queen was talking about professional dermaplaning, DIY treatments have been shown to produce many of the same benefits.

Described as ‘the ultimate pain-free beauty tool’, the Dreamiskin razor claims to exfoliate skin, create a seamless base for makeup and improve the absorption of skincare products, making the face appear younger and brighter.

Ms Echazar and Mr Moncur promote their razors through micro-influencers, people with between 1,000 and 100,000 social media followers who endorse products to their audience

Ms Echazar and Mr Moncur promote their razors through micro-influencers, people with between 1,000 and 100,000 social media followers who endorse products to their audience

While it’s relatively straightforward to use, it’s important to push gently on skin, holding it taut and shaving in a downwards direction, never against the hair follicle.

Shaving against the grain can cause irritation, razor bumps and in some cases, even razor burn.

Like all ‘Gen Z’ entrepreneurs, Ms Echazar and Mr Moncur are naturals at harnessing the remarkable selling power of social media.

That understanding led them to collaborate with celebrities like Martha and micro-influencers such as Hannah Schroder, a beauty vlogger who promotes the razors to her 38,500 followers.

Read more at DailyMail.co.uk