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Man, 32, died after suffering a head injury due to an epileptic fit in 24 Hours in A&E

24 Hours in A&E viewers were left ‘broken’ when a man tragically died after suffering a head injury due to an epileptic fit, before being treated for a lung infection. 

In last night’s episode of the Channel 4 show, Mark Legg, 32, who was diagnosed with a rare condition known as Noonan syndrome shortly after birth, was rushed to St George’s after hitting his head on a hard floor. 

While many took to Twitter to express how emotional they were following the heartbreaking news that he eventually lost his life, others were left outraged after a young woman appeared to be waiting to get her spot checked.  

‘I was really hoping for a fairytale ending for that lovely young man with Noonan’s – Mark – but it wasn’t to be. A sad story sympathetically told. My sympathies to his family,’ wrote one, while a second penned: ‘Hope that woman gets charge for using a&e for a b***** spot.’ 

Mark Legg, 32 (pictured) was rushed to hospital in last night’s episode of 24 Hours in A&E after he suffered a head injury due to an epileptic fit 

Viewers were left outraged after an anonymous woman appeared to be sitting in the waiting room to get a painful spot checked out

Viewers were left outraged after an anonymous woman appeared to be sitting in the waiting room to get a painful spot checked out

Viewers were left heartbroken after it was revealed that Mark had sadly lost his life towards the end of the episode (pictured)

Viewers were left heartbroken after it was revealed that Mark had sadly lost his life towards the end of the episode (pictured)

A third added: ’24 Hours in A&E…Heartbreaking man,’ while a second agreed: ’24 Hours in A&E broke me tonight.’

Mark’s parents told how it was very clear from the moment their son was born, looking at the reaction of the staff, that something wasn’t quite perhaps as it should be. 

‘We knew there was as problem but no one explained to us anything,’ said his mum, Lesley, as Dad Ian added:

‘But one day a very bright pediatrician managed to work out what it might be which was a very rare genetic condition called Noonan’s condition.’ 

Lesley continued: ‘Ian and I started to read his book and it was awful. There was no life expectancy, we were told he would never talk, he would never walk, and he would never feed himself.’

Viewers were left feeling emotional after it was revealed Mark (pictured) tragically lost his life after returning to the hospital a further nine times

Viewers were left feeling emotional after it was revealed Mark (pictured) tragically lost his life after returning to the hospital a further nine times 

Following Mark's diagnosis of Noonan's syndrome when he was younger, his mother Lesley explained: 'Ian and I started to read his book and it was awful. There was no life expectancy, we were told he would never talk, he would never walk, and he would never feed himself'

Following Mark’s diagnosis of Noonan’s syndrome when he was younger, his mother Lesley explained: ‘Ian and I started to read his book and it was awful. There was no life expectancy, we were told he would never talk, he would never walk, and he would never feed himself’

Those who tuned in told how they were 'blubbing' following the heartbreaking episode of the Channel 4 show (pictured)

Those who tuned in told how they were ‘blubbing’ following the heartbreaking episode of the Channel 4 show (pictured)

During the episode, Mark was taken for a CT scan after doctors were concerned his seizure may have been triggered by a chest infection.  

‘The CT head scan has come back and there’s no concerns concerns – it’s just the swelling that will go down,’ the doctor said. ‘Looks like there may be a chest infection, pneumonia there as well, so I’ve treated him for that as well.’ 

But while Mark remained in St George’s whilst doctors treated his lung infection, he returned home two days later to enjoy time with his friends and family.

WHAT IS NOONAN SYNDROME? 

Noonan syndrome is a genetic condition that can cause a wide range of distinctive features and health problems.

The condition is present from before birth, although milder cases may not be diagnosed until a child gets older.

The most common features of Noonan syndrome are:

unusual facial features, such as a broad forehead, drooping eyelids and a wider-than-usual distance between the eyes

short stature (restricted growth)

heart defects (congenital heart disease)

It’s estimated that between 1 in 1,000 and 1 in 2,500 children are born with Noonan syndrome. It affects both sexes and all ethnic groups equally. 

What causes Noonan syndrome?

Noonan syndrome is caused by a fault in one of several genes. At least 8 different faulty genes have been linked to the condition so far.

In some cases, the faulty gene associated with Noonan syndrome is inherited from one of the child’s parents. The parent with the faulty gene may or may not have obvious features of the condition themselves. Only one parent needs to carry the fault to pass it on and each child they have has a 50% chance of being born with the condition.

In other cases, the condition is caused by a new genetic fault that isn’t inherited from either parent. In these cases, the chance of the parents having another child with Noonan syndrome is very small. 

Source: NHS

He was treated at the hospital a further nine times, but after his last admission he never returned home.

‘Emotional mess after watching 24Hours in A&E,’ wrote one viewer, while a second commented: ‘RIP Mark, what a lovely young man, gone way too soon but what a life. Raising awareness for rare diseases.’ 

A third added: ‘I just watched on +1 & now blubbing. He was so lovely & his parents so amazing,’ while a fourth penned: 

‘I have just finished watching this. What a beautiful young man with an incredible family x thank you for sharing their story. Rest in peace Mark, May your memories live on.’   

An anonymous woman (pictured) was seen discussing a spot cheek with a friend and said: 'When I touched it this morning it was really hard. It's just like the pressure'

An anonymous woman (pictured) was seen discussing a spot cheek with a friend and said: ‘When I touched it this morning it was really hard. It’s just like the pressure’

Many were left questioning whether the young woman in the waiting room has actually gone to hospital due to her spot (pictured)

Many were left questioning whether the young woman in the waiting room has actually gone to hospital due to her spot (pictured)

But while some who tuned in were left heartbroken, others were left outraged after a young woman appeared to be visiting A&E to get her cheek spot checked out. 

‘When I touched it this morning it was really hard,’ she said to her friend. ‘It’s just like the pressure.’ 

One viewer commented: ‘I am totally befuddled…has somebody seriously gone to A+E because they’ve got a big spot?!?!’ ‘Yes…yes, they have. And that, ladies & gentlemen, is what’s wrong with some young people these days – I despair for their future!’  

A second questioned: ‘Did someone actually go to Accident and Emergency because they had a spot on 24 Hours In A&E?!’ while a further added: 

‘Want to see the problems with the NHS? Watch 24 hours in a&e and you will see some bird went in for a spot on her cheek.’

‘Taking up a bed, a nurses time and f*** knows what else for a spot on her cheek. The nurse popped it for her absolute disgrace.’

One viewer told how she was left 'befuddled' after it seemed the lady in question had gone to A&E because she had a spot on her cheek

One viewer told how she was left ‘befuddled’ after it seemed the lady in question had gone to A&E because she had a spot on her cheek

Read more at DailyMail.co.uk


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