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Man, 33, who stole Jayme Closs’ underwear after she was kidnapped is sentenced to probation 

A man who broke into Jayme Closs’ home and stole her underwear two weeks after she was kidnapped and her parents were murdered was sentenced to two years of probation on Wednesday.

Kyle Jaenke-Annis, 33, of Cameron, Wisconsin, was charged with felony burglary but was convicted of misdemeanor theft in a plea deal in Barron County Circuit Court.  

Police arrested him inside the Closs’ Barron County home at 2:30 a.m. on October 27, 2018, hours before Jayme’s parents James and Denise were buried. 

Jaenke-Annis told them he found the door unlocked and walked in to steal Jayme’s underwear, tank tops and a dress because he wanted to know ‘what size she was’ and did not think anyone would miss them.

Jaenke-Annis was convicted of burglarizing the family home of Jayme Closs, 13 (pictured)

Kyle Jaenke-Annis, 33, (left) was sentenced to two years of probation on Wednesday, June 26, for burglarizing the family home of Jayme Closs, 13, (right) two weeks after her parents were killed and she vanished

Jayme Closs (pictured) was kidnapped on October 15, 2018 and held captive for 88 days before she escaped

Closs' parents James, 56, and Denise, 46, were shot dead by her abductor

Jayme Closs (left) was kidnapped on October 15, 2018 and held captive for 88 days before she escaped. Her parents James, 56, and Denise, 46, (right) were shot dead by her abductor

Jaenke-Annis, shown in a social media photograph, told officers when they found him in the home on October 27, 2018, that he wanted to know 'what size Jayme was'

Jaenke-Annis, shown in a social media photograph, told officers he did not think anyone would miss her clothes if he stole them

Jaenke-Annis, shown in social media photographs, told officers when they found him in the home on October 27, 2018, that he wanted to know ‘what size Jayme was’ and did not think anyone would miss her clothes

As part of his sentence, Jaenke-Annis was also ordered to undergo a psychological assessment. 

Investigators found the theft was unrelated to 13-year-old Jayme’s disappearance.

She went missing on October 15 last year after authorities found her parents shot dead inside their home. 

In January, Jayme escaped her kidnapper, Jake Patterson, 22, after being held for 88 days in his Douglas County woodland cabin – some 70 miles from the Closs family home.    

The teenager was found near the cabin in the isolated town of Gordon by a woman walking her dog. 

Neighbors called 911 and Patterson was arrested within minutes.  

Patterson was sentenced on May 24 to two life sentences without parole for Jayme’s abduction and the murder of her parents James, 56, and Denise, 46.  

Patterson, who used a shotgun to kill the couple, was described as ‘one of the most dangerous men to walk on this planet,’ by presiding judge Justice James Babler at Barron County Circuit Court. 

Jake Patterson, 22, was sentenced on May 24, 2019 to two life sentences for the murders of James and Denise Closs and a further 40 years for abduction of their daughter Jayme

Jake Patterson, 22, was sentenced on May 24, 2019 to two life sentences for the murders of James and Denise Closs and a further 40 years for abduction of their daughter Jayme

Patterson took Jayme to this woodland home in Gordon, Wisconsin where he held the 13-year-old prisoner for 88 days before she was able to escape

Patterson took Jayme to this woodland home in Gordon, Wisconsin where he held the 13-year-old prisoner for 88 days before she was able to escape

Closs was held captive in this space under Patterson's bed at his woodland home in Gordon, Wisconsin. He barricaded her in with tote bags weighted down by barbell weights and free weights

Closs was held captive in this space under Patterson’s bed at his woodland home in Gordon, Wisconsin. He barricaded her in with tote bags weighted down by barbell weights and free weights

The judge branded Patterson a danger to society due to his fantasies of ‘taking multiple girls, and killing multiple families’. He summarized some of Patterson’s writings, saying that he fantasized ‘about keeping a young girl, torturing her and controlling her’.

Patterson admitted to concocting a plan to kidnap the 13-year-old girl, whom he had never met, after seeing her get off a school bus near her home. 

The sick abductor held Jayme captive in his rural cabin for three months, forcing her to stay in a small space under his bed and barricading her in with tote bags weighted down by barbell weights and free weights.

Jayme told investigators that Patterson ‘would make her stay under the bed for up to 12 hours at a time with no food, water or bathroom breaks,’ according to the complaint.  

Jayme, pictured after she was rescued, escape after Patterson made her go under the bed and told her he would be gone five or six hours. She told police she pushed the boxes away, crawled out, put on a pair of Patterson's shoes and fled the house

Jayme, pictured after she was rescued, escape after Patterson made her go under the bed and told her he would be gone five or six hours. She told police she pushed the boxes away, crawled out, put on a pair of Patterson’s shoes and fled the house

This is the shotgun Jake Patterson used to kill Jayme Closs' parents and to shoot in the door to their home

This is the shotgun Jake Patterson used to kill Jayme Closs’ parents and to shoot in the door to their home 

Images of Patterson's home showed a shabby living area with a couch, refrigerator, an old television set and an unfinished ceiling

Images of Patterson’s home showed a shabby living area with a couch, refrigerator, an old television set and an unfinished ceiling

Patterson was arrested soon after Jayme managed to escape his home on January 10. He was charged with kidnapping and two counts of first-degree murder

Patterson was arrested soon after Jayme managed to escape his home on January 10. He was charged with kidnapping and two counts of first-degree murder

In her victim impact statement read out by her attorney as her kidnapper was sentenced to life in prison, a defiant Jayme said: ‘Jake Patterson took a lot of things that I love away from me. It makes me the most sad that he took away my mom and my dad.’ 

Jayme, who did not appear in court, described the night her parents were killed as a ‘horrifying memory’ that has left her too scared to go out in public and unable to visit her family home. 

‘There are some things that Jake Patterson can never take from me. He can’t take my freedom. He thought he could own me and he was wrong. I’m smarter. I watched his routine and I took back my freedom. I will always have my freedom and he will not,’ she said.    

Her aunt Jennifer Smith, who now takes care of the teen, said Jayme no longer has a 13-year-old’s life and said their family lives in fear every day. 

Audio of the 911 call made from her mother’s cellphone on the morning of Jayme’s abduction and her parents’ murders recently emerged. 

The call was made shortly before 1:00 a.m. on Monday October 15, 2018 from inside the Closs family home. 

Patterson carried out his planned attack when he pulled into the Closs driveway in the early hours of October 15 dressed in black and wearing a face mask, hat and gloves. He kicked down the door and shot dead Jayme's parents. Their home is pictured above

Patterson carried out his planned attack when he pulled into the Closs driveway in the early hours of October 15 dressed in black and wearing a face mask, hat and gloves. He kicked down the door and shot dead Jayme’s parents. Their home is pictured above 

Little can be made out beyond the dispatcher’s fervent attempts to make contact with the caller. At one point there is a muffled scream and sounds of movement and shouting before the call abruptly drops.

Police arrived just four minutes later to find both James and Denise Closs shot dead in a bloody crime scene from which their teenage daughter had been dragged.

Patterson recently told prison staff at he pled guilty to ‘make it easier’ for her but claims authorities made up ‘exaggerated’ and ‘not entirely accurate’ details about him in the trial. 

He said he did not know why prosecutors in their criminal complaint against him, and later officials in a pre-sentence investigation report, faked information. 

But he said he had no intention to appeal his two life sentences.

Despite Patterson admitting his guilt, his motivations for the horror ordeal still remain a mystery.   

Read more at DailyMail.co.uk


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