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Man has revealed how to cut CHEESE with your Jatz cracker

‘This just blew my mind’: Foodie wows the internet after showing how to slice cheese with the side of his Jatz cracker

  • Australian Lucas Rutherford has shared a revolutionary Jatz hack on TikTok
  • The social media comedian shared a video on the platform explaining the trick
  • He discovered that you can use the side of the biscuit to cut through cheese
  • The ridged edges give it a unique ‘knife-like’ capability, but it’s not on purpose
  • Arnott’s confirmed they were not originally created for slicing through cheese

Poll

Will you try out this trick?

  • Yes, it’s a ‘game changer’ 0 votes
  • No, I’ll stick with a knife 1 votes

An Australian man has discovered a ‘revolutionary hack’ for slicing cheese with the scalloped side of a Jatz or Savoy cracker, wowing thousands on social media. 

Lucas Rutherford, from Melbourne, shared a video of the unusual method on TikTok, saying that both Arnott’s Jatz and Savoy crackers can be used to do it. 

‘Check this out, it just blew my mind,’ he said. 

‘So everyone has the biscuit at home or a variety of it. If you get these biscuits with the jagged edges and roll them across your cheese you’ve now got little pieces for yourself.’

 

'Check this out, it just blew my mind,' he said to start the video

An Australian man has discovered a ‘revolutionary hack’ for slicing cheese with the side of a Jatz or Savoy cracker, wowing thousands on social media 

A thin slice of tasty or cheddar cheese from a block was used in the video – it’s likely the trick wouldn’t be as effective on harder cheeses. 

Despite the simple nature of the video, thousands of people commented and shared it in ‘disbelief’. 

‘Bro this is my go to snack… HOW DID I NOT FIGURE THIS OUT?’ One person commented underneath the video.

‘Right well I’ll be throwing out all my knives then,’ a woman said.

A third added: ‘Thank you good sir this is my new party trick’.

'So everyone has the biscuit at home or a variety of it. If you get these biscuits with the jagged edges and roll them across your cheese you've now got little pieces for yourself,' he said

‘So everyone has the biscuit at home or a variety of it. If you get these biscuits with the jagged edges and roll them across your cheese you’ve now got little pieces for yourself,’ he said

The video, which has clocked 291,000 views since it was posted on July 3, was brought to the attention of Arnott’s. 

‘Whilst we can’t confirm the edges were originally created for slicing cheese, the sturdiness and scalloped edge of the Savoy gives it enough strength to handle this operation,’ the brand’s spokesperson told Lifestyle Food. 

‘The secret to its cheese cutting success might lie in the number of ridges on each biscuit, which many don’t know.

‘Either way, Savoy are Arnott’s number one selling biscuit in the country, along with Jatz.’    

A thin slice of tasty or cheddar cheese from a block was used in the video - it's likely the trick wouldn't be as effective on harder cheeses

'Bro this is my go to snack... HOW DID I NOT FIGURE THIS OUT?' One person commented underneath the video

A thin slice of tasty or cheddar cheese from a block was used in the video – it’s likely the trick wouldn’t be as effective on harder cheeses 

What’s the difference between a Jatz and Savoy cracker?

1. Savoy were on the market in Victoria and Tasmania before Jatz, whereas Jatz was in New South Wales and Queensland first.

2. Savoy has its name embossed on the actual cracker, whereas Jatz does not.

3. Jatz contain full cream milk powder and malt while Savoy contain golden syrup instead of malt.

The biscuit makers have previously outlined the differences between the Jatz and Savoy crackers in a 2013 Facebook post. 

‘Jatz and Savoy crackers are reasonably similar but you can tell the difference immediately as “SAVOY” is embossed on the Savoy cracker,’ the company said.

‘There are also some recipe differences between the two crackers – the most obvious ones are that Jatz contains full cream milk powder and malt while Savoy contains golden syrup instead of malt.’

This means that Savoys are slightly harder in crunch than the Jatz, which fall apart more easily. 

‘Savoy were on the market in Victoria and Tasmania before Jatz. They were then made in Melbourne by the Brockhoff biscuit company. Arnott’s joined with this company in the early 1960s and adopted many of its products,’ the post continued.

‘It was decided to keep Savoy and Jatz because consumers in Victoria and NSW were equally passionate about their local brands.’

Read more at DailyMail.co.uk


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