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Man who joined a social media cult was forced to have sex with a guy and drink his leader’s semen

A former member of a social media cult has revealed how he was targeted online as an aspiring musician with the promise of online fame only to be coerced into giving up everything to raise money for the organization. 

Matthew, who requested to use only his first name, opened up to journalists Emilie Friedlander and Joy Crane about the four years he spent under the leadership of KoA Malone and Eben ‘Wiz-EL’ Carlson and their self-described ‘cult’ Tumple, which later evolved into the DayLife Army. 

In the expose published on One Zero, he detailed how KoA and Wiz-EL went from being his perceived mentors to controlling every aspect of his life. Over time, he was ordered to have sex with a man, despite identifying as straight, and encouraged to drink orange juice that Wiz-El had mixed with his own semen.  

Cult: Matthew, who requested to use only his first name, opened up about the four years he spent in the ‘cult’ Tumple, which later evolved into the DayLife Army

Leaders: He explained how KoA Malone (left) and Eben 'Wiz-EL' Carlson (right) went from being his mentors to controlling every aspect of his life

Leaders: He explained how KoA Malone (left) and Eben ‘Wiz-EL’ Carlson (right) went from being his mentors to controlling every aspect of his life

Matthew was just 18 years old and nearing the end of his first semester of college at a school in Chicago when he first came in contact with the couple in 2013. He had just finished an album, and when he shared his first single on Twitter, KoA and Wiz-El started replying to his tweets. 

Wiz-El, a white man, gave Matthew advice and preyed on his desire to create his own ‘multidimensional content brand.’ The then 46-year-old claimed to have known grunge rock stars when he lived in Seattle in the ’90s.

KoA, a Black woman, also had musical ties. Her one brother, Kyp Malone, was a member of the indie rock band TV on the Radio, while another was the Los Angeles DJ known as Total Freedom.  

Matthew was flattered by their attention and struck up a relationship with them. The couple, who only wore white and also lived in Chicago at the time, encouraged Matthew to release music under the artistic pseudonym ‘Buum,’ which they later took to calling him. 

He was a sophomore in college when he became Wiz-El’s first recruit for his new religious movement, Tumple.  

The group was described as a ‘cult’ and had its own language known as ‘Unglish,’ which simply required substituting the letters U and Y for random vowels. 

Controlled: While under their influence, he dropped out of college, gave them all of his money, got kicked out of his home, and relocated with them a number of times

Controlled: While under their influence, he dropped out of college, gave them all of his money, got kicked out of his home, and relocated with them a number of times

Core values: The organization promoted pleasure, anti-racist education, and sobriety, as well as mystical sex practices

Core values: The organization promoted pleasure, anti-racist education, and sobriety, as well as mystical sex practices

‘”U” is an open vowel. A container waiting to be filled. It has the effect of turning your words into stations for listening,’ Tumple’s website explains. 

Speaking to the Daily Dot in 2016, Koa said the goal of the cult was to replace the ‘white methodology’ of capitalistic society with ‘a new foundation, the Black pleasure foundation.’ 

The organization promoted pleasure, anti-racist education, and sobriety, as well as mystical sex practices that members could learn through a ‘Pearl Divun’ course that cost $2,000 per month. 

The group was founded on Facebook and recruited people who hung out on the ‘Weird Facebook’ section of the social media site.  

Tumple had about a dozen members at the time as well as 50 more casual followers who were dubbed ‘orbiters.’ 

Wiz-El and KoA promised every aspiring social media influencer’s dream— the ability to generate money from their online content. 

According to One Zero, the leaders primarily targeted young artists and musicians, who were expected to create promotional Facebook posts and videos for Tumple. 

Their income was to come from PayPal donations, and a portion of their earnings had to be given to Wiz-EL and KoA. 

Manipulation: Matthew recalled sleeping with a man under KoA's orders, despite identifying as straight, and being encouraged to drink orange juice mixed with Wiz-EL's semen

Manipulation: Matthew recalled sleeping with a man under KoA’s orders, despite identifying as straight, and being encouraged to drink orange juice mixed with Wiz-EL’s semen

Rules: Members can't consume any alcohol or drugs. They must stay well-groomed and dress in white or light colors only. Matthew is pictured getting his hair cut by Wiz-EL

Rules: Members can’t consume any alcohol or drugs. They must stay well-groomed and dress in white or light colors only. Matthew is pictured getting his hair cut by Wiz-EL

Friedlander and Crane spoke to 24 people who were a part of the cult, and some  former members described the organization as an authoritarian regime where recruits were expected to follow the group’s lifestyle guidelines, known as ‘Standurds,’ and reach unrelenting content and revenue quotas. 

According to the Standurds, members can’t consume any alcohol or drugs. They aren’t allowed to use scented products. They must stay meticulously clean and well-groomed and dress in white or light colors only. 

Recruits are also forbidden from holding conventional jobs, and any money they do earn has to go back to the cult. 

Matthew recalled how Wiz-El nudged him into dropping out of college his sophomore year by having him read The Teenage Liberation Handbook: How to Quit School and Get a Real Life and Education. 

In addition to encouraging him to leave school, the couple started suggesting he ask his parents for money in support of his new life path.  

When he demanded his parents give him access to his college fund while he worked with Wiz-El, they stopped paying his rent and he was forced to move back home.  

His parents were even more alarmed when they read the Daily Dot’s article about the cult. They changed their home Wi-Fi password so he would no longer have access to the internet.   

Desperate to produce content, he went to the public library and asked his followers on the Tumple Facebook group to call his mother and ask her to give him access to their internet at home.       

Hard to handle: Members weren't allowed to work conventional jobs, and in order to make money, they had to ask family and friends for cash or get donations online

Hard to handle: Members weren’t allowed to work conventional jobs, and in order to make money, they had to ask family and friends for cash or get donations online

Working: Members were given menial jobs and required to clean daily without payment

Working: Members were given menial jobs and required to clean daily without payment 

His mother saw the request, and after getting into a heated argument, she called the cops and had him removed from their home. He was allowed to briefly return the next day to pick up some personal belongings, including a suitcase and sleeping bag.  

Around this time, in late 2016, KoA announced is actually Pleiadian Light Form known as a Generalissimo KoA and serving aliens in the pursuit of ‘true pleasure’ on Earth. 

Keeping with Tumpl’s spiritual principles, the group evolved into the DayLife Military, also known as DayLife Army. KoA became the group’s general, Wiz-EL was her second in command, and members of the group’s first division were dubbed ‘soldiurs.’ 

They served an extraterrestrial government called the Galactuc Federation, which KoA claimed to communicate with using a pendulum she carried around.   

Soldiers were expected to use their social media accounts and whatever money they could scrounge up to fight the racism, exploitation, and suffering found in modern society, which they referred to as the ‘Pain Matrix.’ 

They were told that donations were an opportunity to ‘wash’ their money and support the DayLife Military’s ‘2,000-year plan.’  

After leaving his home and couch surfing for the better part of the year, Matthew reached out to Wiz-EL and KoA and became one of the first people to enlist. 

During this time, KoA started to question Matthew’s sexuality and suggest he may be attracted to men. Before heading to the cabin, an online-only member contacted him to give him her marching order: He would have to be physically intimate with a guy — a Black man, specifically.  

While Matthew identifies as being straight, he was open to the idea of experimenting with men, but he was uncomfortable doing so as an order.  

He was so desperate for his mentors to be right that he hooked up with a man he met on Tinder just to complete KoA’s assignment.  

Brainwashed: Matthew (pictured earlier this year) left the cult in 2018 and started attending meetings with other cult survivors, He realized they all had similar stories

Brainwashed: Matthew (pictured earlier this year) left the cult in 2018 and started attending meetings with other cult survivors, He realized they all had similar stories

Warning: Matthew, who is now focused on rebuilding his life, has started sharing his story and warning others against the DayLife Army on Instagram

Warning: Matthew, who is now focused on rebuilding his life, has started sharing his story and warning others against the DayLife Army on Instagram 

In September 2017, he joined the leaders at a remote cabin in western Washington, which was owned by Wiz-EL’s mother, and slept on couch cushions on the floor. 

He paid $480 a month to stay at the property, which he was required to clean without payment. He also had to keep up with his Facebook posts and undergo psychoanalysis with Wiz-EL and KoA. 

Matthew wasn’t allowed to have sugar or put ice cubes in his water, but he noticed those rules only seemed to apply to him. 

He recalled a two-week period in which Wiz-EL would urge him to drink orange juice that he had mixed with his own semen.

Not only was he encouraged to drink it, he also had to ‘pay’ for the privilege by reaching a certain number of Facebook posts. Other requirements included tracking his masturbation, during which he was forbidden from watching straight porn.     

Members were expected to make daily payments to the organization, but they weren’t allowed to hold down jobs. To make money, they had to ask their family and friends for it or try hitting up random social media accounts for donations. Sometimes, they even had to beg in the street.  

They relocated a number of times and having to spend nights on the street became a more frequent occurrence. Matthew and other members would go on Grindr and Tinder just to find money and a place to stay. 

The cult’s demands began to take a toll on his mental health and he finally resigned in late 2018. He moved back home and eventually started working with therapists who specialized in cult recovery.  

When he started attending meetings with other cult survivors, he realized they all had similar stories of being controlled by leaders who claimed to have a connection with a higher power.

Fundraising and recruitment were fundamental for the survival of the cults. Rules and menial labor were used to keep them in line, and they were punished for any and all violations.  

‘It hurt — especially because the initial thing that was tapped into was, “You’re going to be this legendary artist,”‘ Matthew told One Zero. ‘You’re being inflated with this importance that you’re saving the world, thinking that you’re in new biblical times and everyone around you is the most pivotal person ever, and you’re creating a new way of life, the greatest artistic statement of your century. 

‘If anything, I feel like the real art piece of the thing is just basically that they recreated the exact abusive structure of the quote-unquote Pain Matrix.’ 

Matthew, who is now focused on rebuilding his life, has started sharing his story and warning others against the DayLife Army on an Instagram account he created earlier this year.  

In his posts, he describes the ideology and methods of the DayLife Army while explaining how the group preys on and exploits vulnerable people like himself. 

‘I didn’t know what was ironic, what was sincere, fake or real,’ he wrote in one post. ‘All I knew was that I was going to follow the next order and keep going at all costs.’



Read more at DailyMail.co.uk


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