News, Culture & Society

Marsupial previously EXTINCT from mainland Australia makes comeback

  • A marsupial extinct from mainland Australia for 50 years has made a comeback
  • Efforts thanks to a number of environmentally conscious teams made it possible
  • Twenty critters were released at the grounds of the Booderee National Park

A marsupial extinct from mainland Australia for 50 years has made a miraculous comeback.

As a result of the efforts attributed to multiple conservation and wildlife groups, government departments and researchers, eastern quolls are being reintroduced to the wild.

The carnivore disappeared from sight in New South Wales during the 1970s but remained active in Tasmania, the Mercury reported.  

A marsupial extinct from mainland Australia for 50 years has made a comeback

Efforts thanks to a number of environmentally conscious teams made it possible

Efforts thanks to a number of environmentally conscious teams made it possible

On Tuesday evening, a group of 20 the small critters were set free to roam the grounds of the Booderee National Park, on the south coast of NSW.  

‘It was a long day, but a very exciting day,’ said Darren Glover, the head of living ecosystems at the World Wildlife Fund (WWF).

He said that for thousands of years eastern quolls played a part in the ecosystem as primarily insect eaters and that it will be interesting to see how they adapt to that role once again in Booderee.  

Twenty critters were released at the grounds of the Booderee National Park

Twenty critters were released at the grounds of the Booderee National Park

It was made possible by the combined hard work from the Australian Government, World Wildlife Fund (WWF), Rewilding Australia, Booderee National Park and its traditional owners, ANU and many others.

‘Eastern quolls used to occur throughout much of southeastern Australia, but because of the introduction of the European red fox, they [have been] limited to Tasmania,’ said Booderee National Park Natural Resource Manager Dr Nick Dexter.

He said the park is their ideal new home as the number of foxes and other predators has significantly decreased. 

 



Read more at DailyMail.co.uk