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Masterchef’s Poh Ling Yeow speaks candidly about leaving the Mormon church

‘I was forever changed’: Masterchef’s Poh Ling Yeow says she left the Mormon church after meeting an ‘amazing’ transgender woman

Masterchef Australia’s Poh Ling Yeow has spoken candidly about her history with organised religion. 

Having grown up in a home where there were ‘six deities at an alter’ to pray to and later ‘flirting with born-again Christianity’, the Malaysian-born chef started following the Mormon church with her family as a teenager.

The 47-year-old told the Sydney Morning Herald that she left the church at age 24, after her world view was broadened by a transgender friend from Canada.

Masterchef Australia’s Poh Ling Yeow has spoken candidly about leaving the Mormon church – after her Canadian transgender friend helped her broaden her world view

Poh explained her family were in a ‘vulnerable’ state when Mormons came door-knocking. 

‘We were like “look at these pristine young men who are so wholesome and happy! Yes, yes we want to be part of of this!” For my folks, it was an immediate social network,’ Poh explained. 

While Poh’s family still practice Mormonism, Poh left the church at 24.  

History: Having grown up in a home where there were 'six deities at an alter' to pray to and later 'flirting with born-again Christianity', the Malaysian-born chef started following the Mormon church with her family as a teenager

History: Having grown up in a home where there were ‘six deities at an alter’ to pray to and later ‘flirting with born-again Christianity’, the Malaysian-born chef started following the Mormon church with her family as a teenager

It was a ‘big deal’ for Poh to go against her family’s beliefs, but she felt her experiences, such as travelling and going to university, helped her ‘broaden [her] mind’.

‘One of the placed I’d moved to was Canada and my first friend there was transgender. She took me under her wing and taught me how to catch the subway. 

‘An amazing person. When I came home again, I was forever changed. I couldn’t really accept [my] religion anymore,’ Poh said. 

It was a 'big deal' for Poh to go against her family's belief, but she felt her experiences, such as travelling and going to university helped her 'broaden [her] mind'

It was a ‘big deal’ for Poh to go against her family’s belief, but she felt her experiences, such as travelling and going to university helped her ‘broaden [her] mind’

According to the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints handbook, church leaders ‘counsel against elective medical or surgical intervention’ in order to transition.

They also ‘counsel against social transitioning’, which is defined in the handbook as changing ‘dress, grooming, names or pronouns’, according to the online publication.

If you, or someone you know, wish to anonymously speak about gender identity or LGBTQI+ related support, please call QLife at 1800 184 527. 

If you, or someone you know, wish to anonymously speak about gender identity or LGBTQI+ related support, please call QLife at 1800 184 527. Poh pictured alongside Tessa Boersma and Khan Ong

If you, or someone you know, wish to anonymously speak about gender identity or LGBTQI+ related support, please call QLife at 1800 184 527. Poh pictured alongside Tessa Boersma and Khan Ong 

Read more at DailyMail.co.uk


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