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Meet young boy, 10, earning thousands by selling CHICKENS as he released beanie range for birds

While running a company can seem daunting and out of reach for many, one ten-year-old boy has become a seasoned businessman before finishing primary school.

Max Cosgrove first started his chicken breeding company when he was seven, and has watched it boom with customers travelling six hours just to buy his birds.

The youngster spoke to Daily Mail Australia and said his company – aptly named ‘Max’s Chickens’ – had tripled in size since it was founded in 2015.

‘People think they’re going to come and see an older person and they’re surprised when they see a ten-year-old kid,’ Max said.

While running a company can seem daunting and out of reach for many, Max Cosgrove (pictured) has become a seasoned businessman all before he finished school

The ten-year-old (pictured) first started his chicken breeding company when he was seven-years-old and watched it boom with customers travelling six hours just to buy his birds

The ten-year-old (pictured) first started his chicken breeding company when he was seven-years-old and watched it boom with customers travelling six hours just to buy his birds

The youngster said his company - aptly named 'Max's Chickens' - had tripled in size since it was founded in 2015 and expanded to sell 'cheanies' - chicken beanies and jumpers (pictured)

The youngster said his company – aptly named ‘Max’s Chickens’ – had tripled in size since it was founded in 2015 and expanded to sell ‘cheanies’ – chicken beanies and jumpers (pictured)

The central Queensland boy said it all started with a dream to sell eggs so his parents helped him buy his first incubator before it hatched into something bigger.

After raising his chickens, Max was able to sell about 80 birds at his first show.

‘That year I broke the Mt Larcom Show record for selling birds and chickens,’ he said.

‘It was around $600 (profit) … I was very excited because I’m saving up for a house down the road.’

Fast forward three years and the young farmer said he had sold between 800 and 1000 chickens – all bred by himself. 

The 10-year-old ‘does the chooks’ every morning before leaving for school and in the afternoon he checks his 100 birds as well as the ‘cows and fences’.

‘Now I’ve got around 15 breeds in 17 cages and I’ve been hatching 30 a week – nearly every day (a chicken hatches),’ Max told Daily Mail Australia.

‘It has grown a whole lot more bigger then when I first started.’

The central Queensland boy said it all started with a dream to sell eggs but it grew much bigger

The central Queensland boy said it all started with a dream to sell eggs but it grew much bigger

Max’s parents first helped him buy an incubator (left and with newer incubator right) before hatching into a booming business 

After raising his chickens, Max was able to sell about 80 birds (pictured) at his first show

After raising his chickens, Max was able to sell about 80 birds (pictured) at his first show

'That year I broke the Mt Larcom Show record for selling birds and chickens,' he said 

‘That year I broke the Mt Larcom Show record for selling birds and chickens,’ he said 

Max’s business advice

The 10-year-old shared his five tips for people wanting to start a business.

1. Enjoy every part of it – like a hobby

2. Have quality stock people will like

3. Listen to your customers

4. Work hard

5. Learn from others around you to use for your business 

While the young boy had some help from his parents, Belinda and Laurie, along the way, his beloved business had been built through his own hard yakka.

‘They’re (my parents) very supportive of me and proud that I work hard,’ Max said. 

‘Mum does the Facebook side and dad makes the chook pens.’

Ms Cosgrove said her son was a ‘tireless worker’ who continued to run his business when she was unable to help after being diagnosed with breast cancer last year.

‘Like a little champion, he worked not only in his own business but also was endlessly helping me around the house and bringing me endless cups of tea,’ she said.

During the three years, Ms Cosgrove said Max’s profit would be ‘enough to buy his cattle’ and ‘a bit towards the house down the road that he’s got his eyes on’.

While the young boy had some help from his parents, Belinda and Laurie (pictured together), along the way, his beloved business had been built through his own hard yakka

While the young boy had some help from his parents, Belinda and Laurie (pictured together), along the way, his beloved business had been built through his own hard yakka

During the three years, Ms Cosgrove said Max's profit would be 'enough to buy his cattle' and 'a bit towards the house down the road that he's got his eyes on'.

During the three years, Ms Cosgrove said Max’s profit would be ‘enough to buy his cattle’ and ‘a bit towards the house down the road that he’s got his eyes on’.

As a lot of Max’s costs go back into buying grain for the chickens he was able sell enough birds to buy ‘five head’ of cows.

‘Normally (my profit) just gets saved. It would be a bit … it is a good hobby,’ he said.

The innovative creator is yet to slow down after expanding the business by stocking ‘cheanies’ – chicken beanies and jumpers – as well as selling mangoes and inventing mango picking sticks.

The quirky woolen jumpers, who are knitted by Max’s great aunt and nanna, were created by Max and his mother one day for ‘fun’ but have since sky rocketed in sales.

‘It’s just all fun … well the phone goes off every 10 seconds with notifications,’ he told Daily Mail Australia. 

‘Nanna gets paid with kisses and cuddles.’ 

The innovative creator is yet to slow down after expanding the business by selling mangoes 

The innovative creator is yet to slow down after expanding the business by selling mangoes 

The young entrepreneur also created 'mango picking sticks' (pictured) which he sells through his poultry company

The young entrepreneur also created ‘mango picking sticks’ (pictured) which he sells through his poultry company

While Max’s chooks are purely business, he does have ‘two or three special ones’ called ‘Favourite Girl, Roger and Princess and Peaches’. 

Despite still being in primary school, the ambitious youngster said he learned the tricks of the trade ‘naturally along the way’. 

Max said all the hard work paid off the moment he could watch his customer’s reactions when they purchased his special chickens.

‘They’re nice and friendly, people like to support a young kid,’ he said. 

Despite still being in primary school, the ambitious youngster (pictured) said he learned the tricks of the trade 'naturally along the way' and loved watching his customer's buy his chooks

Despite still being in primary school, the ambitious youngster (pictured) said he learned the tricks of the trade ‘naturally along the way’ and loved watching his customer’s buy his chooks



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