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Meghan Markle and Prince Harry join Prince William and Kate Middleton for Festival of Remembrance

Meghan Markle and Prince Harry have joined Kate Middleton, Prince William and the Queen at the Royal Albert Hall for the annual Festival of Remembrance.

It is the first time the Sussexes and Cambridges have been seen together since Harry and Meghan opened up about their struggles in an emotional television documentary last month.

All four of them sat with the Queen in the royal box for the event on Saturday evening.

The service is also being attended by the Duke of York, the Earl and Countess of Wessex, the Princess Royal, the Duke and Duchess of Gloucester, the Duke of Kent and Vice Admiral Sir Tim Laurence.

This year’s event marks 75 years since notable battles of 1944, which included Monte Cassino, Kohima and Imphal, D-Day and the collaboration of Commonwealth and Allied forces.

It also celebrates the 100th anniversary of the Government Communications Headquarters and pay tribute to RFA Mounts Bay which delivered supplies and aid to the Bahamas after Hurricane Dorian this year.

Kate Middleton this evening

Meghan Markle and Prince Harry (left) have joined Kate Middleton (right), Prince William and the Queen at the Royal Albert Hall for the annual Festival of Remembrance

It is the first time the Sussexes and Cambridges (pictured) have been seen together since Harry and Meghan opened up about their struggles in an emotional television documentary last month

It is the first time the Sussexes and Cambridges (pictured) have been seen together since Harry and Meghan opened up about their struggles in an emotional television documentary last month

Meghan Markle and Prince Harry joined Kate Middleton and Prince William in the royal box alongside Her Majesty the Queen (pictured)

Meghan Markle and Prince Harry joined Kate Middleton and Prince William in the royal box alongside Her Majesty the Queen (pictured)

This year's event marks 75 years since notable battles of 1944, which included Monte Cassino, Kohima and Imphal, D-Day and the collaboration of Commonwealth and Allied forces

This year’s event marks 75 years since notable battles of 1944, which included Monte Cassino, Kohima and Imphal, D-Day and the collaboration of Commonwealth and Allied forces

The ceremony is hosted by the Royal British Legion and commemorates all those who lost their lives in conflicts, with artists including James Blunt, Leona Lewis and Jeff Goldblum performing alongside the Central Band of the Royal Air Force and Band of HM Royal Marines

Leona Lewis

The ceremony is hosted by the Royal British Legion and commemorates all those who lost their lives in conflicts, with artists including James Blunt (left), Leona Lewis (right) and Jeff Goldblum performing alongside the Central Band of the Royal Air Force and Band of HM Royal Marines

This year's ceremony (pictured) also celebrates the 100th anniversary of the Government Communications Headquarters and pay tribute to RFA Mounts Bay which delivered supplies and aid to the Bahamas after Hurricane Dorian this year

This year’s ceremony (pictured) also celebrates the 100th anniversary of the Government Communications Headquarters and pay tribute to RFA Mounts Bay which delivered supplies and aid to the Bahamas after Hurricane Dorian this year

The ceremony is hosted by the Royal British Legion and commemorates all those who lost their lives in conflicts, with artists including James Blunt, Leona Lewis and Jeff Goldblum performing alongside the Central Band of the Royal Air Force and Band of HM Royal Marines.

Harry and Meghan opened up about their struggles with the pressures of royal life and media scrutiny last month, as the Duchess of Sussex revealed she was ‘existing, not living’.

The Prince also admitted he and William are travelling on ‘different paths’ – in what was the first public acceptance of a rift between the brothers.

In a candid interview, the Duke of Sussex acknowledged there had been deepening tensions between himself and William, following months of speculation about the state of the brothers’ relationship.

The Duke of Cambridge was said to be ‘worried’ about his younger brother and hoped he and Meghan were ‘all right’, a Kensington Palace source told the BBC online.

But another told how Prince William was ‘furious’ with Harry for giving the interview and had told him so.

The source said there was a view throughout the Royal Family that the couple were ‘in a fragile place’.

Meanwhile today, the Prime Minister gave tributes ahead of Remembrance Sunday as the three main party leaders prepared to break away from the election campaign trail to pay their respects tomorrow.

Boris Johnson said he will be ‘proud’ to lay his first wreath at the Cenotaph as PM, and vowed to continue to ‘champion those who serve today with such bravery in our military’.

Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn used a video message to say many serving personnel, veterans and their families are ‘not getting the support they deserve’.

And Liberal Democrat leader Jo Swinson said people should pause to reflect and remember how ‘fragile’ peace can be.

Mr Johnson at the Royal Albert Hall this evening

Boris Johnson (pictured today) said he will be 'proud' to lay his first wreath at the Cenotaph as PM, and vowed to continue to 'champion those who serve today with such bravery in our military'

Boris Johnson (left, at the event this evening, and right, earlier today) said he will be ‘proud’ to lay his first wreath at the Cenotaph as PM, and vowed to continue to ‘champion those who serve today with such bravery in our military’

The trio will be joined by the SNP’s Westminster leader Ian Blackford and the DUP’s Nigel Dodds in paying their respects at the Cenotaph on Sunday morning.

Mr Johnson said: ‘On Remembrance Sunday this year I will be thinking of the men and women who, over the centuries, have given so much to protect our country.

Civilians will be BANNED from marching past the Cenotaph during London’s Remembrance Sunday parade

Civilians have been banned for the first time from marching past the Cenotaph during London’s Remembrance Sunday parade.

The move was made by the Royal British Legion to give priority to military veterans or bereaved family members, according to The Telegraph.

However the decision has caused ‘hurt and dismay’ among charities and associations such as the British Red Cross who have previously taken part in the march, insiders revealed last night.

Yet the Legion, which organises the commemoration, insisted that the decision had not been ‘taken lightly’.  

On Sunday, around 10,000 people will march past the Cenotaph on Whitehall, for the National Service of Remembrance.

In previous years, associations including the Blue Cross, RNLI and British Red Cross have been part of the parade due to the contributions to the war effort. 

The Royal British Legion sent out an unexpected message to the associations warning that civilian volunteers with no connection to the Armed Forces would not be able to take part in the march.

‘I will especially remember the men and women who gave the ultimate sacrifice in war, so that today we can live in peace.

‘I will be proud to lay my first wreath at the Cenotaph as Prime Minister.

‘I am immensely grateful to those who continue to choose a life in the armed forces – without them, our country would be a less safe place to live.

‘I introduced the first Office for Veteran Affairs as a sign of my commitment to those who have served, and I will continue to champion those who serve today with such bravery in our military.’

Mr Corbyn said: ‘We remember the many brave people from Britain and all across the world who put their lives on the line, making huge sacrifices in two world wars which cost the lives of millions, and in all the other conflicts since.’

He added: ‘For so many of our armed forces, our veterans and their families who have given and still give so much to us, they are not getting the support they deserve.

‘Service men and women have faced pay cuts, service accommodation left in disrepair, and are worried their children are left without the support that they need.’

Ms Swinson, who will be attending the service for the first time as Lib Dem leader, said: ‘Today we remember all those who gave their lives so that we can live in freedom.

‘We also give our heartfelt thanks to those members of our armed forces, to veterans and their families, for all they do and the sacrifices they make to keep us safe.

‘We know it is so hard for people to be away from their loved ones and we owe them a debt of gratitude.

‘We should also pause to reflect and remember today how fragile peace can be and how important it is that we all continue to stand up alongside our allies to preserve it.’

Read more at DailyMail.co.uk


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