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Meghan Markle’s facialist and make-up artist reveals the secrets on how to tackle a spot

Meghan’s facialist reveals how to tackle an unexpected spot – including why you should always start with massaging to reduce inflammation

  • Sarah Chapman is renowned for the Duchess of Sussex’s pre-wedding skin prep
  • Daniel Martin helped to create her simple and natural wedding-day beauty look
  • Tips include creating a thin layer so makeup isn’t directly applied on blemish  

Meghan Markle’s facialist and makeup artist have combined their expert knowledge to reveal how to tackle a surprise spot. 

There’s nothing worse than waking up on the day of a big event only to find you’ve  developed an angry-looking blemish overnight.  

But Sarah Chapman, from London, who was responsible for the Duchess’ pre-wedding skin, and US-based makeup artist Daniel Martin, who helped to create her flawless natural glow, are used to making skin look and feel its best no matter what. 

‘I never really recommend for people to do their own extractions at home, but at the same time we’re all human and sometimes we want to squeeze and pick,’ Sarah told Stylist. ‘So for me it’s about making sure it’s done in the right, sterile way and with clean hands.’

Their top tips include massaging the area to reduce inflammation and adding an eyeshadow primer before concealing the blemish with makeup.

Meghan Markle’s facialist Sarah Chapman and makeup artist Daniel Martin have combined their expert knowledge to reveal how to tackle an unexpected spot. Pictured, the Duchess rides in an Ascot Landau along the Long Walk after her wedding to Prince Harry in St George’s Chapel in Windsor Castle

Facialist Sarah Chapman (above), from London,  helped the Duchess of Sussex with her pre-wedding skin prep

Facialist Sarah Chapman (above), from London,  helped the Duchess of Sussex with her pre-wedding skin prep

Speaking to the publication, Sarah, who also works with the likes of Victoria Beckham, highlighted the importance of addressing the spot before trying to cover it up with layers of concealer. 

‘The best thing to do is to use a warm compress – just warm water with a little bit of witch hazel or tea tree for there anti-bacterial properties,’ she said. ‘Literally just press it onto the spot.’

She then went on to suggest moving a piece of tissue around the area to encourage the spot to pop if its ready – but to avoid squeezing it at all costs.

After cleaning and sterilising the surrounding area, Sarah recommended the use of her spot stickers which not only help prevent bacteria from getting in but also help to reduce inflammation.  

Makeup expert Daniel Martin helped to create the natural beauty look Meghan wore on her wedding day to Prince Harry

Makeup expert Daniel Martin helped to create the natural beauty look Meghan wore on her wedding day to Prince Harry

While it’s dependent on the type of spot, if it has a head, massaging the area will reduce the size of the blemish, making it easier to disguise with concealer.  

Meanwhile, makeup expert Daniel Martin highlighted the importance of prepping the spot beforehand so that it doesn’t touch the make-up that’s applied on top of it. 

‘After the treatment to the actual spot, I take a small amount of cortisone gel and lay a thin film over the area and let it sit for a minute or two,’ he told the magazine. ‘That helps protects the area.’

He then adds an eye shadow primer to seal the spot before applying concealer and foundation in an attempt to hide the blemish. 

Read more at DailyMail.co.uk