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Most residents in the Northeast and West wear masks, but less so in the Plains and South

A map has shown where Americans are wearing face masks to help get the coronavirus pandemic under control.

Public health officials say wearing face coverings can slow the spread of the virus, but they are not being adopted widely in every state. 

Redditor bgregory98 collected data from The New York Times and research firm Dynata to plot out all 3,141 counties in the US.

The map shows that residents of hotspot states like California, Texas and Florida – and former hotspot New York – are the most compliant about mask use with between 70 and 100 percent of people wearing them in public.

Meanwhile, residents in counties located in the Plains and Midwest, which is starting to seen an uptick in cases, had much low rates of mask-wearing with as little as 30 percent compliance.  

A map shows the face mask-wearing rates across all 3,141 counties in the US amid the coronavirus pandemic (above)

Counties in the Northeast, now seeing record-lows, and the West, experiencing record-highs, were high with rates between 70% and 100%. Pictured: People wear protective face masks while shopping in New York City, July 26

Counties in the Northeast, now seeing record-lows, and the West, experiencing record-highs, were high with rates between 70% and 100%. Pictured: People wear protective face masks while shopping in New York City, July 26

Rates were much lower in counties in the Plains, such as South Dakota and Iowa, which saw rates as low as 30%. Pictured: Spectators watch swine judging at the Jasper County Fair in Colfax, about 30 miles east of Des Moines, Iowa, July 21

Rates were much lower in counties in the Plains, such as South Dakota and Iowa, which saw rates as low as 30%. Pictured: Spectators watch swine judging at the Jasper County Fair in Colfax, about 30 miles east of Des Moines, Iowa, July 21

There are two main methods by which the coronavirus spreads with the first being via droplets that are expelled into the air when a person coughs or sneezes. 

These droplets are about one-third the size of a human hair, but visible to the naked eye, according to researchers from UC Davis.

The second way is from aerosol particles that humans spray into air when we speak, which are one-onehundreth the size of a human hair and nearly impossible to see.

This method is more dangerous in terms of transmission, but can be lessened by avoiding crowded indoor spaces.

Researchers have found that covering the nose and mouth can decrease the risk of these particles entering your body and infecting you with COVID-19 by 65 percent. 

For the map, the firm Dynata interviewed 250,000 participants about their mask use between July 2 and July 14.

Specifically, each person was asked: ‘How often do you wear a mask in public when you expect to be within six feet of another person?’

The map then shows the odds of, if someone came across five people, that all of them would be wearing a mask.

There are stark regional differences with mask use very high in the Northeast and the West.

The Northeast was one of the hardest hit regions when the pandemic first struck the US and are home to states with some of the highest number of deaths including New York, New Jersey and Massachusetts.

However, infection rates in the region have hit record lows over the past few weeks and deaths in stats like New York have stayed in the single digits.

California has been hit hard by the virus, with the most cumulative cases in the US and record-high deaths. Pictured: People wearing face masks walk in Beverly Hills, July 30

California has been hit hard by the virus, with the most cumulative cases in the US and record-high deaths. Pictured: People wearing face masks walk in Beverly Hills, July 30

Meanwhile, mask compliance in states like South Dakota is low, but the Midwest and Plains are seeing an upswing in cases. Pictured: Residents cap off Independence Day activities with a carnival and a street dance in Belle Fourche, South Dakota, July 4

Meanwhile, mask compliance in states like South Dakota is low, but the Midwest and Plains are seeing an upswing in cases. Pictured: Residents cap off Independence Day activities with a carnival and a street dance in Belle Fourche, South Dakota, July 4

The West has also had high mask compliance but these states, once shining examples, are now seeing record highs.

Washington state has recorded a 42 percent jump in deaths over the last week and California now has the highest number of confirmed cases and reported the highest single-day number of deaths at 197 on Tuesday.

Meanwhile, counties in South Dakota and Iowa have low mask compliance. Photos came out of a rally President Trump held at Mount Rushmore on July 3 showing crowds without masks.

Additionally, at the Iowa State Fair, families were seen without any type of face covering.   

Dt Anthony Fauci told ABC’s Good Morning America that he is concerned about states in Midwest such as Indiana, Kentucky Ohio and Tennessee which could see a surge in coronavirus cases.

Those states ‘are starting to have that very early indication’ of a spike, Fauci said, in reference to the number of positive test results. 

‘That’s a surefire sign that you’ve got to be really careful.’   

In Florida and Texas, both of which are experiencing bad outbreaks, most counties are in the 70 percent to 90 percent range.

In a recent survey conducted by YouGov, researchers asked people from different countries how often they wear a mask when they leave the house.

In the US, 59 percent of participants said ‘always’ – much lower than other countries – while 14 percent said never.

Sixty-three percent of participants in Germany replied ‘always’ as did 77 percent of people in Japan and 85 percent in Mexico.

However, responses in the US were high than other countries too.

Only 35 percent of participants in Canada said they ‘always’ wear masks when they leave the house as did 19 percent of UK respondents and four percent in Norway. 

Read more at DailyMail.co.uk