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Mother leading class action against misdiagnosing doctors after daughter Amy Jensen died from cancer

A heartbroken mother is leading a class action against misdiagnosing doctors after her daughter died from cancer despite being told a lump in her breast was ‘nothing to worry about’.

Amy Jensen died at the age of 30, two years after she was misdiagnosed by a doctor who wrongly told her the lump in her breast was not cancerous.

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Eight months after her misdiagnosis, Amy got a second opinion and learnt she had advanced breast cancer.

  

A heartbroken mother is leading a class action against misdiagnosing doctors after her daughter Amy Jensen (pictured) died from cancer despite being told a lump in her breast was ‘nothing to worry about’

Amy’s mother Leigh Jensen said she would never forget the moment she learned of her daughter’s diagnosis.

‘I rang and she said “I’m in the doctor’s surgery right now and he’s told me I’ve got breast cancer”,’ Mrs Jensen told Seven News.

Amy started treatment immediately, but died just three days after she married her partner.

The 30-year-old’s death left her grieving husband and family devastated. 

Mrs Jensen believed her daughter’s chance at survival would have been much greater if she was diagnosed correctly the first time and had started treatment eight months earlier.

Amy's mother Leigh Jensen (pictured) said she would never forget the moment she learned of her daughter's diagnosis

Amy’s mother Leigh Jensen (pictured) said she would never forget the moment she learned of her daughter’s diagnosis

Amy died just three days after marrying her partner, leaving the 28-year-old devastated 

Amy died just three days after marrying her partner, leaving the 28-year-old devastated 

Mrs Jensen is now leading a group of women in a class action against misdiagnosing doctors and clinicians. 

She is joined by Dianne Dickenson, who was misdiagnosed herself.

Mrs Dickenson was told her breast screen was clear, before discovering the result was wrong 15-months later. 

She underwent a mastectomy and began treatment, but was left with serious health issues, Seven News reported.

Mrs Dickenson urged women, and men, to ‘seek another opinion’ to avoid finding themselves in a similar situation.  

Dianne Dickenson (pictured) urged women, and men, to 'seek another opinion' to avoid finding themselves in a similar situation

Dianne Dickenson (pictured) urged women, and men, to ‘seek another opinion’ to avoid finding themselves in a similar situation



Read more at DailyMail.co.uk


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