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Motorcycle rider is charged after allegedly coughing and spitting at cops in Beverly Hills

Drunk motorcycle rider is charged after allegedly coughing and spitting in the face of cops who stopped him to ask about breaking lockdown rules

  • Police stopped man for not wearing helmet at Beverly Hills  at 5.45pm on Friday
  • He allegedly coughed and spat at the police officer when he was pulled over
  • The 31-year-old took a breath test and allegedly returned a positive reading  
  • He was charged with 10 offences and is due to appear in court on Saturday 

A drunk motorbike rider who allegedly coughed and spat at police officers has been charged.

The man was stopped by police in Beverly Hills in Sydney’s south about 5.45pm on Friday when he was spotted not wearing a helmet. 

After being pulled over, the 31-year-old then allegedly coughed and spat at the police.

They undertook a roadside breath test and he allegedly returned a positive reading of 0.079. 

He was arrested and taken to St George Police Station where he was charged with 10 offences including drive with low range PCA, use unregistered Class A motor vehicle, use uninsured motor vehicle.

The man was stopped by police in Beverly Hills in Sydney’s south about 5.45pm on Friday when he was spotted not wearing a helmet (stock)

He was also charged with drive motor vehicle unlicensed for Class, and motorbike rider not wear helmet, drive on path, resist officer in execution of duty.

The man also refused to produce his licence and provide his address to the arresting officer.

Further to that he was charged with not complying with noticed direction regarding spitting/coughing – COVID-19.

The man would be fined $5,000 for spitting on a police officer.  

The man was refused police bail and is due to appear at Parramatta Bail Court on Saturday. 

NSW Assistant Police Commissioner Karen Webb said it is ‘traumatic’ for health and public officials to be dealing with incidents such as these. 

‘It is very traumatic because my peers and public officers working at the frontline are putting their lives ahead of other people during this time,’ she said.

‘To have someone spit or cough at them puts them in no doubt a lot of stress while they wait to see what the results are of the person that coughed or spat – whether they are positive – and what that means for them if they are. 

‘But just the theatre that creates… and it is abhorrent to think that someone would spit at another person.’ 

 

Read more at DailyMail.co.uk