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Motorists accuse McDonald’s of encouraging customers to break the law with sign in its drive-thru

Motorists accuse McDonald’s of encouraging customers to break the law after spotting controversial sign in a drive-thru

  • Motorists have accused McDonald’s of encouraging them to break the law 
  • Signs in Drive-Thru windows offer Apple and Android Pay 
  • Drivers must turn their car off completely before they can use their phone 
  • A drive-thru lane is under the same jurisdictions as any other public roadway 

Motorists have accused McDonald’s of encouraging them to break the law by paying with their mobile phone in the drive-thru lane.

An image of a sign at a Perth McDonald’s drive-thru showing the various options customers have to pay for their food was posted to Facebook.

The sign informs motorists they have the option to use Apple or Android pay from their car.

The only way a motorist can legally use their phone to pay is if their vehicle is turned off and in park, so they are considered not driving.

A McDonald’s Drive-Thru window showing drivers being offered the option to pay using Apple and Android Pay (pictured) 

‘McDonald’s promoting Apple and Android pay in drive thru,’ the man wrote on Facebook.

Social media users were quick to debate the controversial law.

‘So you have to turn off your engine, remove keys, tap and pay, then start up again,’ wrote one person.

‘Opening my wallet and looking for my bank card is even more of a distraction,’ added another.  

Victoria Police posted a Facebook poll in August asking whether customers thought it was legal to use your phone to pay whilst in a drive-thru window.

Out of 55,000 votes, 65% thought it was legal, but police confirmed that it wasn’t, unless certain precautions are made.

The only way a motorist can legally use their phone to pay is if their vehicle is completely turned off, so they are considered not driving (stock image)

The only way a motorist can legally use their phone to pay is if their vehicle is completely turned off, so they are considered not driving (stock image)

‘If you intend to use your mobile phone to pay at the drive-through window, apply the hand brake, switch the engine off and then access your mobile phone,’ Victoria Police commented.

A fast food outlet’s drive-thru lane is under the same legal jurisdictions as any other public roadway, where being caught using your mobile phone in any way whist behind the wheel can incur major fines for guilty drivers. 

‘The rules of the road absolutely apply within our car parks and drive thru’s,’ a McDonald’s spokesperson told Daily Mail Australia.

‘There is an onus on the driver to ensure they are operating their vehicle within applicable road rules; including if they are choosing to use mobile payment methods.’

‘However, provided they do this, it is perfectly legal for customers to use mobile payment in drive-thru.’

Different fines and demerit points apply between states in Australia for using your phone behind the wheel, with the most severe fine reaching $534 in South Australia, while in New South Wales motorists can lose five demerit points. 

A fast food outlets drive-thru lane is under the same legal jurisdictions as any other public roadway, where being caught using your mobile phone in any way whist behind the wheel can incur major fines for guilty drivers (stock image)

A fast food outlets drive-thru lane is under the same legal jurisdictions as any other public roadway, where being caught using your mobile phone in any way whist behind the wheel can incur major fines for guilty drivers (stock image)

Read more at DailyMail.co.uk


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