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Mount Isa family don’t go outdoors because of bats at their home

Plague of BATS in backyard sees family held hostage in their own home – with stench from droppings and tick infestation leaving their kids unable to play outside

  • Family refuse to let children play because of bat problems at Mount Isa home
  • The tic-infested pests leave behind droppings and urine and crawl over toys
  • They fly into the side of the house and screech loudly in the dead of night
  • The family say something has to be done as the problem is now out of control 

A family are too afraid because thousands of tick-infested bats have invaded their backyard.   

Darren Craig and Brooke Love, from Mount Isa, have stopped going in the garden and have banned their children from playing outside, the Townsville Bulletin reported.

The couple fear that their daughter Ena, 3, and son Zac, 10, will get sick from bats’ droppings and ticks that the pests leave behind on their toys.   

Darren Craig and Brooke Love, from Mount Isa, have stopped going in the garden and have banned their children from playing outside 

The couple also have 22 solar panels connected to their roof but they are so covered in bat poo that they hardly work. 

They also keep the family awake at all hours of the night as they fly into the side of the house and constantly screech.

Mr Craig says the bats are so loud he can hear them over his motorbike as he drives down the street.

‘They don’t leave,’ he said.  

Under Queensland State Government legislation the bats are a protected species.

Bob Katter and his Australian Party has challenged for the legislation to be changed to better manage the bat problem.

‘We need to get the balance right on this — if the Government is opposed to a cull, then at least assist us to be able to move … bats on urgently and practically,’ he said. 

Environment Minister Leeanne Enoch said a middle ground had to be reached between protecting the animals and addressing community concerns.

‘The Palaszczuk Government supports a balanced approach to managing our native wildlife that conserves and protects vulnerable species and their habitat, while managing the safety and expectations of a growing community,’ she said. 

The bats  also keep the family awake at all hours of the night as they fly into the side of the house and constantly screech

The bats  also keep the family awake at all hours of the night as they fly into the side of the house and constantly screech

The couple fear that their daughter Ena, 3, and son Zac, 10, will get sick from bats' droppings and ticks that the pests leave behind on their toys

The couple fear that their daughter Ena, 3, and son Zac, 10, will get sick from bats’ droppings and ticks that the pests leave behind on their toys 

Read more at DailyMail.co.uk


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