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Mouth-watering breakfast recipes that can help you beat diabetes

Today, in the third part of our groundbreaking series, NHS GP Dr David Unwin reveals how going low-carb can have surprising health benefits, such as cutting your blood pressure, while chef and food writer Katie Caldesi offers more exclusive recipes.  

When I first started offering a low-carb approach to my patients with type 2 diabetes, my wife, Dr Jen Unwin, who is an NHS psychologist, and I also went on the diet. We were both possibly carrying a bit too much middle-aged spread and wanted to trim down. I also wanted to keep my blood sugar levels at a healthy level.

Every Monday night, Jen and I met the patients — there were 18 to begin with — to share our experiences, support each other and try out simple low-carb recipes we prepared together.

Today, in the third part of our groundbreaking series, NHS GP Dr David Unwin (centre) reveals how going low-carb can have surprising health benefits, such as cutting your blood pressure, while chef and food writer Katie Caldesi (right) offers more exclusive recipes

On average the group lost one-and-a-half stone in weight, and four inches off our waists (I myself lost three) but there were some other surprises too. I started noticing that if I stood up too quickly, I felt dizzy.

One day on checking my blood pressure — which had previously been high — I was astonished to find it was now in the ‘normal’ range (my reading was 130/80) for the first time in ten years. My previous average had been 160/90.

When I checked the others, nearly all of the group had also significantly improved their blood pressure and several patients were even able to come off their blood pressure medication, in some cases after many years.

Meanwhile, Jen also experienced dizziness and some weakness if she got up too quickly — she found it necessary to add extra salt to her food to help rectify this. She had always had low blood pressure and on low-carb, it became too good!

When I first started offering a low-carb approach to my patients with type 2 diabetes, my wife, Dr Jen Unwin, who is an NHS psychologist, and I also went on the diet. We were both possibly carrying a bit too much middle-aged spread and wanted to trim down. Pictured is Giancarlo and Katie Caldesi

When I first started offering a low-carb approach to my patients with type 2 diabetes, my wife, Dr Jen Unwin, who is an NHS psychologist, and I also went on the diet. We were both possibly carrying a bit too much middle-aged spread and wanted to trim down. Pictured is Giancarlo and Katie Caldesi

A second surprise was how the patients’ levels of ‘bad’ blood fats such as LDL cholesterol (linked to heart disease) also improved. This was particularly interesting given that they were eating more full-fat dairy such as yoghurt, butter and cream.

Six years later I’ve seen similar results with hundreds of patients. At the time of writing I have a research group of 257 patients who have been low-carb for an average of nearly two years. One patient has lost 5½ stone (36kg), while the average weight loss is 21lb (9.4kg).

Their blood pressure reading and ‘bad’ fats levels have also improved, as a study I’ve published in the International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health shows. The research paper, which was written with the help of two senior cardiologists, looked at 154 of the patients (the ones who had raised blood sugar levels).

These patients had been on 168 regular prescriptions for their high blood pressure — but thanks to going low-carb, their blood pressure improved significantly. Indeed, around a fifth (21 per cent) of the prescriptions were stopped. This is very unusual. People are normally on these medications for life.

A few months ago a 66-year-old patient of mine lost 11lb (5kg) in just seven days. Pictured is Dr David Unwin

A few months ago a 66-year-old patient of mine lost 11lb (5kg) in just seven days. Pictured is Dr David Unwin

To be frank, these blood pressure results particularly astonished me.

But then, when I looked back through the medical research, I found that evidence has been building for 20 years now that sometimes a diet heavy on carbs can cause the body to retain salt. That’s because of the effect that the hormone insulin has on the kidneys (carbs, as we now know, can raise insulin levels).

Insulin causes salt retention by the action of the kidneys in people with diabetes. This salt in its turn causes fluid retention and higher blood pressure. So when some people give up carbs, their insulin levels reduce.

They start urinating more than usual. That’s because their bodies are getting rid of the salt that their previously sugary diets had caused them to retain, which helps explain why their blood pressure improved and in some cases also their swollen ankles.

A few months ago a 66-year-old patient of mine lost 11lb (5kg) in just seven days.

This must have been mainly water. His blood pressure improved significantly so I needed to reduce his medication (which illustrates why it’s so important that people on prescribed medication should discuss significant dietary changes with their doctor).

Then last week I saw him again and he was wearing shorts. His previously severely swollen ankles had gone and he is so proud of his now slim ankles he was happy to show them off. The same study of 154 patients also showed significant improvements in cholesterol and triglyceride levels.

This was another surprise but again research backs this up. Last year, a major scientific review led by researchers at John Moores University in Liverpool found that low-carb was better for lowering cholesterol and triglycerides than low-fat diets.

In fact, this is no surprise really, as excess dietary sugar turns into a fat (triglyceride) in the liver.

While most people know that cholesterol and triglycerides are bad news, perhaps we also should be wary of the hormone insulin, and by ‘we’ I don’t just mean people with type 2 diabetes.

Increasingly it’s emerging that this hormone is central to many of our modern problems – and not only type 2 diabetes, obesity and fatty liver disease. On top of this there is mounting evidence that links insulin and obesity with cancer, high blood pressure and heart disease. Quite a list.

Insulin is a hormone produced by the pancreas: its job is to keep blood sugar low by pushing glucose out of the bloodstream and into cells. In the case of muscle cells, the glucose is a source of energy but if day after day you consume more glucose than needed, the excess sugar can be pushed into other cells where it becomes fat.

In the liver the excess sugar is converted into triglyceride, which builds up over time, causing fatty liver disease, which in turn can lead to type 2 diabetes, liver scarring and even liver failure.

The good news is that much of this can be reversed. This can be done in three ways: weight-loss surgery, a very low-calorie diet — or a low-carb diet.

But how can you make this diet work best for you and your lifestyle?

In tomorrow’s Daily Mail I’ll show you how to maintain and ‘personalise’ a low-carb diet to make it even easier. 

When I first started offering a low-carb approach to my patients with type 2 diabetes, my wife, Dr Jen Unwin, who is an NHS psychologist, and I also went on the diet. We were both possibly carrying a bit too much middle-aged spread and wanted to trim down. I also wanted to keep my blood sugar levels at a healthy level.

Every Monday night, Jen and I met the patients — there were 18 to begin with — to share our experiences, support each other and try out simple low-carb recipes we prepared together.

Should I worry about having more saturated fat? 

Going low-carb can mean eating a diet higher in full-fat dairy, eggs and good fats such as olive oil.

In the early days, I did worry about the effects on cholesterol and the risk of cardiovascular disease in my patients.

However, I was surprised to find their average cholesterol came down. This, together with the improved blood pressure and weight loss they experienced, could suggest improved heart health.

The saturated fat debate remains contentious. 

But a recent review (involving eight studies and 1,600 participants) concluded: ‘Large randomised controlled trials of at least six months’ duration with carbohydrate restriction appear superior in improving lipid markers [cholesterol and other blood fats] when compared with low-fat diets.’

For anyone with familial hypercholesterolemia, a genetic form of high cholesterol, or readers who worry about cholesterol, speak to your GP before embarking on this new plan. 

On average the group lost one-and-a-half stone in weight, and four inches off our waists (I myself lost three) but there were some other surprises too. I started noticing that if I stood up too quickly, I felt dizzy.

One day on checking my blood pressure — which had previously been high — I was astonished to find it was now in the ‘normal’ range (my reading was 130/80) for the first time in ten years. My previous average had been 160/90.

When I checked the others, nearly all of the group had also significantly improved their blood pressure and several patients were even able to come off their blood pressure medication, in some cases after many years.

Meanwhile, Jen also experienced dizziness and some weakness if she got up too quickly — she found it necessary to add extra salt to her food to help rectify this. She had always had low blood pressure and on low-carb, it became too good!

A second surprise was how the patients’ levels of ‘bad’ blood fats such as LDL cholesterol (linked to heart disease) also improved. This was particularly interesting given that they were eating more full-fat dairy such as yoghurt, butter and cream.

Six years later I’ve seen similar results with hundreds of patients. At the time of writing I have a research group of 257 patients who have been low-carb for an average of nearly two years. One patient has lost 5½ stone (36kg), while the average weight loss is 21lb (9.4kg).

Their blood pressure reading and ‘bad’ fats levels have also improved, as a study I’ve published in the International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health shows. The research paper, which was written with the help of two senior cardiologists, looked at 154 of the patients (the ones who had raised blood sugar levels).

These patients had been on 168 regular prescriptions for their high blood pressure — but thanks to going low-carb, their blood pressure improved significantly. Indeed, around a fifth (21 per cent) of the prescriptions were stopped. This is very unusual. People are normally on these medications for life.

To be frank, these blood pressure results particularly astonished me.

But then, when I looked back through the medical research, I found that evidence has been building for 20 years now that sometimes a diet heavy on carbs can cause the body to retain salt. That’s because of the effect that the hormone insulin has on the kidneys (carbs, as we now know, can raise insulin levels).

Insulin causes salt retention by the action of the kidneys in people with diabetes. This salt in its turn causes fluid retention and higher blood pressure. So when some people give up carbs, their insulin levels reduce.

They start urinating more than usual. That’s because their bodies are getting rid of the salt that their previously sugary diets had caused them to retain, which helps explain why their blood pressure improved and in some cases also their swollen ankles.

A few months ago a 66-year-old patient of mine lost 11lb (5kg) in just seven days.

This must have been mainly water. His blood pressure improved significantly so I needed to reduce his medication (which illustrates why it’s so important that people on prescribed medication should discuss significant dietary changes with their doctor).

Then last week I saw him again and he was wearing shorts. His previously severely swollen ankles had gone and he is so proud of his now slim ankles he was happy to show them off. The same study of 154 patients also showed significant improvements in cholesterol and triglyceride levels.

This was another surprise but again research backs this up. Last year, a major scientific review led by researchers at John Moores University in Liverpool found that low-carb was better for lowering cholesterol and triglycerides than low-fat diets.

In fact, this is no surprise really, as excess dietary sugar turns into a fat (triglyceride) in the liver.

While most people know that cholesterol and triglycerides are bad news, perhaps we also should be wary of the hormone insulin, and by ‘we’ I don’t just mean people with type 2 diabetes.

Increasingly it’s emerging that this hormone is central to many of our modern problems – and not only type 2 diabetes, obesity and fatty liver disease. On top of this there is mounting evidence that links insulin and obesity with cancer, high blood pressure and heart disease. Quite a list.

Insulin is a hormone produced by the pancreas: its job is to keep blood sugar low by pushing glucose out of the bloodstream and into cells. In the case of muscle cells, the glucose is a source of energy but if day after day you consume more glucose than needed, the excess sugar can be pushed into other cells where it becomes fat.

In the liver the excess sugar is converted into triglyceride, which builds up over time, causing fatty liver disease, which in turn can lead to type 2 diabetes, liver scarring and even liver failure.

The good news is that much of this can be reversed. This can be done in three ways: weight-loss surgery, a very low-calorie diet — or a low-carb diet.

But how can you make this diet work best for you and your lifestyle?

In tomorrow’s Daily Mail I’ll show you how to maintain and ‘personalise’ a low-carb diet to make it even easier. 

Eggs with tomatoes, avocado and chilli  

Eggs with tomatoes, avocado and chilli

Eggs with tomatoes, avocado and chilli

This is one of our favourite whip-up-in-no-time meals that has plenty of healthy fat and protein that will fill us up.

Serves 2

Per serving: Carbohydrates, 4.7g; protein, 21g; fat, 39g; fibre, 4.8g; calories, 466

  • 1 ripe avocado
  • 2 tbsp coconut oil or extra virgin olive oil
  • 6 cherry tomatoes, halved
  • ½ a chilli, added to taste, finely sliced
  • 4 eggs
  • Salt and freshly ground black pepper
  • Small handful of coriander leaves
  • 2 heaped tbsp full-fat Greek yoghurt

Halve the avocado and remove the stone. Hold one half and cut the flesh lengthways into long slices just down to, but not through, the skin. Scoop out the slices and arrange on a plate. 

Do the same with the other half. Heat the oil in a frying pan and add the tomatoes and chilli — fry until just soft and lightly browned. 

Remove from the pan and put next to the avocado. Now fry the eggs until set underneath. Scatter the seasoning and coriander over the top. 

Flip the eggs over and leave for a minute. Remove carefully and flip them over on to the plate. 

Serve straight away with any juices left in the pan.

Green eggs

Green eggs

Green eggs

Use any green leaves and herbs such as coriander, parsley, watercress, thyme or savoy cabbage. If you don’t have fresh herbs, use dried thyme or oregano.

Serves 2

Per serving: Carbohydrates, 17g; protein, 21g; fat, 32g; fibre, 3.1g; calories, 386

  • 75g green leaves, roughly chopped
  • 20g butter
  • 4 eggs
  • Salt and pepper
  • 40g mature cheddar, grated
  • 2tbsp crème fraîche or double cream

Beat the eggs with the seasoning, cheese and crème fraîche in a bowl with a fork. Set aside.

Heat the butter in a frying pan until it starts to foam.

Sauté the greens for a couple of minutes, or until just soft. 

Pour in the egg mixture and stir continuously as it begins to set. 

Move the runny eggs and solid areas together until it is cooked to your liking. Remove from the heat and serve straight away.

Ricotta pancakes with cinnamon apples

Ricotta pancakes with cinnamon apples

Ricotta pancakes with cinnamon apples

Serves 4

Per serving: Carbohydrates, 18g; protein, 25g; fat, 59g; fibre, 4.8g; calories, 680

  • 4 eggs, separated
  • 150g ricotta
  • 50g ground almonds
  • 1 tsp baking powder
  • 2 tsp vanilla
  • 1 tsp lemon zest
  • 25g salted butter
  • 1 tbsp extra virgin olive oil
  • 3 medium apples
  • 1tsp ground cinnamon

To serve:

  • 150ml double cream
  • 2 tsp vanilla extract
  • 50g pecans, roughly chopped

Whip the cream and vanilla together; put in the fridge. Cut the apples into thin slices, leaving the skins on. 

Heat three-quarters of the butter and 2 tbsp of water in a pan and add the apple. When browned, add the cinnamon and continue to cook for seven minutes, or until soft. 

Put the egg yolks, ricotta and dry ingredients into a bowl and mix. In another bowl whisk the egg whites to stiff peaks, then gently add to the egg yolk mixture.

Heat the oil and remaining butter. Drop 2 tbsp of the mixture on to the pan to make each pancake and flatten gently. 

When they are lightly browned, flip to the other side. 

Serve the pancakes on individual plates dressed with the apples and any cooking juices from the pan, cream and nuts.

Hash browns to have with sausages, eggs and bacon

Hash browns to have with sausages, eggs and bacon

Hash browns to have with sausages, eggs and bacon

We have used garlic granules in this recipe, not something I usually use in cooking, as I love natural ingredients, but my son Flavio swears it is what gives ready-made hash browns their familiar flavour so I have relented and have to admit they do taste delicious, especially with a dash of home-made ketchup and a fried egg.

Serves 6

Per serving (two hash browns): Carbohydrates, 4.3g; protein, 1.9g; fat, 0.5g; fibre, 0.8g; calories, 31

  • 250g white cabbage, shredded
  • 3 spring onions, very finely chopped
  • 30g ground almonds
  • 2 eggs
  • 1 clove of garlic, grated
  • Plenty of freshly ground black pepper
  • 1tsp salt
  • 2tbsp extra virgin olive oil
  • Knob of butter

Mix the ingredients together for the hash browns, adding the salt last (as it draws the liquid out of the cabbage).

Heat the oil and butter in a frying pan over medium heat and when hot, drop a tablespoon of the mixture into the pan, flattening them down gently with the back of the spoon. 

Cook the hash browns for 3 to 4 minutes, then flip to cook the other side.

Fry for a couple of minutes until lightly brown and serve or keep warm until the rest of breakfast in ready.

They can also be stored, cold, in a container in the fridge for up to three days and reheated as you need them.

Bacon butty   

Bacon butty

Bacon butty

With our warm, buttered low-carb rolls, our no-sugar homemade ketchup and good bacon you have a mouth-watering bacon butty with a fraction of the carbohydrates.

Serves 2

Per serving: Carbohydrates, 2.6g; protein, 0.6g; fat, 2.1g; fibre, 0.5g; calories, 34

For the dough:

  • 50g hot water
  • 30g ground almonds
  • 1tbsp finely ground psyllium husk powder
  • ¹/³tsp gluten-free baking powder
  • Pinch of fine salt
  • ½ egg

For the ketchup:

  • 1 red onion, finely chopped
  • 2tbsp extra virgin olive oil
  • 2 cloves of garlic, finely chopped
  • 400g tin of tomatoes, roughly chopped
  • Salt and pepper
  • ½tsp chilli powder, added according to taste
  • 2tsp balsamic or red wine vinegar
  • 2tsp tamari or gluten-free soy sauce or good pinch salt

To serve:

  • Butter for spreading
  • 6 rashers of streaky bacon

To make the dough, heat the oven to 200c/180c/gas mark 6. Combine the dry ingredients in a bowl, then add the egg and water and quickly stir. Leave it for around ten minutes, then shape it into two balls. 

Lay these on to a baking tray and bake in the oven for 15 minutes, or until they feel firm. Remove and allow to cool. To make the ketchup, soften the onion in olive oil over a low heat. 

Add garlic and cook for two minutes, then add the rest of the ingredients and stir. 

Bring to the boil and then turn the heat to low and simmer for 20 minutes. Blend and adjust the seasoning as desired. 

Allow to cool then store in a glass jar in your fridge for up to a week.

Slice the roll open, spread butter and add a dollop (30ml) ketchup — then top with cooked bacon.

Blackberry and apple mug muffins

Blackberry and apple mug muffins

Blackberry and apple mug muffins

The list of possible flavours of these no-sugar muffins is endless, and are great fun to whip up with the children. 

If you don’t have a microwave, the muffins can be cooked in the oven for 20 to 25 minutes in a muffin mould at 200c/fan 180c/gas mark 6. 

We serve them with whipped cream sweetened with vanilla and some more fresh berries.

Makes 1

Per serving: Carbohydrates, 7.7g; protein, 10g; fat, 21g; fibre, 4.8g; calories, 269

  • 1 egg
  • Knob of butter, melted, or 2 tsp coconut oil or extra virgin olive oil
  • 50g ground almonds
  • ½ apple, grated
  • ½tsp baking powder
  • 1tsp vanilla extract
  • ¼tsp ground cinnamon
  • 20g blackberries or blueberries or raspberries

Mix the egg and the fat together in a mug. 

Add the rest of the ingredients and stir though, mashing the berries into the mixture. 

Make sure it is well combined throughout the mug. 

Level off the top and microwave on full power for three minutes, or until cooked through and firm to the touch.

Turn the muffin out and allow to cool a little before serving.

Coconut and ginger granola

Coconut and ginger granola

Coconut and ginger granola

Serves 4

Per serving: Carbohydrates,1.8g; protein, 2.5g; fat, 12g; fibre, 2g; calories, 130

  • 25g desiccated coconut
  • 10g softened salted butter
  • 1 tbsp finely grated fresh ginger
  • 15g mixed seeds
  • 30g nuts, roughly chopped
  • ½ tsp vanilla extract

To serve:

  • Greek yoghurt
  • Blackberries or blueberries

Mix ingredients together in a bowl. 

Taste the mixture and adjust with vanilla or ginger as desired. Spread it on to a lined tray and cook for six minutes, or until golden brown. 

Remove granola from the oven and allow to cool. It can be stored out of the fridge in a jar for up to three days or a week in the fridge. 

To serve, scatter on to yoghurt with berries.

Sweet potato waffles with cream

Sweet potato waffles with cream

Sweet potato waffles with cream

Mistakenly, people often choose sweet potatoes as a healthy option but they are high in carbohydrates. 

However, by using them in small quantities for their natural sweetness and pairing them with protein from the eggs you can calm any potential spike in blood sugar and enjoy an indulgent, guilt-free waffle or two.

Makes 6

Per waffle: Carbohydrates, 8.6g; protein, 5.5g; fat, 5.5g; fibre, 2.8g; calories, 100

  • 150g sweet potato
  • 150ml whole milk
  • 3 eggs
  • ½ tsp vanilla extract
  • 50g coconut flour
  • 1 tsp of baking powder
  • Pinch of salt
  • ½ tsp cinnamon
  • 2 tsp coconut oil for frying
  • 150g whipped cream
  • 1 tsp vanilla extract
  • Fresh berries

Cook the sweet potatoes in the microwave for around four minutes, or in the oven at 200c/180c fan/gas 6 for 45 minutes, depending on their size. Remove from the oven and split them into quarters. 

Whip the cream and vanilla together until the mixture forms soft peaks. Chill in the fridge until you are ready to serve. Heat the waffle maker or get a frying pan ready.

Scoop the flesh out of the potato and mix with the remaining waffle ingredients in a blender until smooth. 

Use a ladle to put spoonfuls (around 80g each) into the waffle maker and cook for around five minutes until set and lightly browned. 

Remove them while warm and serve straight away with the cream and berries.

You can also cook the waffles in a wide frying pan. Heat the oil and pour spoonfuls into the pan. 

Cook for a couple of minutes each side or until set and cooked through. Serve as above.

Just look at the low-carb foods you can now enjoy! 

You may be wondering how you can live without the carbohydrates you’ve been used to eating. But the good news is that cutting out starchy foods actually frees you to embark on a diet rich in variety and containing delicious foods you may previously have regarded as off-limits. Here, we look at the foods you can look forward to.

What to expect when you go low carb 

When your carbohydrate intake is reduced, as it is when you switch to a low-carb diet, more of your energy is provided from fat. 

This is a perfectly normal process, and once you have adapted, you should find that your cravings for sweet and starchy foods are reduced, and that you feel more energised.

In the first few days, though, while your body adjusts, you may feel slightly light-headed and woozy, particularly when standing up from a sitting position. 

You may also get muscle cramps, headaches or tiredness. 

This is because the hormone insulin (produced to help deal with excess sugar) also causes you to retain salt. Once insulin levels start to drop, you may lose excess salt and water in urine, so you may need the loo more often in the first few days. 

So drink more water to counter this, and add a sprinkle of salt (Himalayan, rock or sea salt) to your food. Magnesium supplements for the first week or ten days may help.

The loss of sodium can also reduce your blood pressure. 

If you are on medication for high blood pressure, monitor it closely. 

The dose may need to be adjusted by your doctor and so it is essential to discuss any dietary changes with them in advance. 

MEAT, FISH AND EGGS

Protein is a source of amino acids that are used in the growth and repair of our bodies. We all need to eat good sources of protein — from animal foods and legumes to nuts, seeds, eggs and dairy.

Our bodies also digest protein to give a steady release of sugar into our bloodstream — one reason a diet rich in protein can be good for someone with type 2 diabetes or high blood sugar levels. Another reason is that protein fills you up.

Animal proteins such as meat are nutritious — but you don’t need to eat a lot; a modest portion of 100g to 150g is plenty. Fish is a fantastic source of protein and quick to prepare. Oily fish is rich in omega-3 fatty acids that are crucial for brain health. Try to eat oily fish, such as salmon, mackerel, anchovies, sardines and herring, at least twice a week. Eggs are good for brain and heart health.

FATS AND OILS

Fat has been seen as a culprit in weight gain because it is higher in calories per gram than protein or carbohydrate.

But healthy fats from natural sources contain the essential vitamins A, D, E and K. And it can be easier to manage your calorie intake with a higher-fat diet as it may help satisfy your appetite. In addition to cooking with butter, you can use olive oil and coconut oil — and even animal fats such as lard.

But if you do want to lose weight, be careful to limit the good fats you eat. Avoid processed vegetable oils, such as sunflower oil and margarine.

PULSES

This food group is moderately high in carbs, so our recipes mix them with vegetables to reduce the spike in blood sugar they can cause. How frequently you enjoy pulses depends on your health goals. If you’re on a strict programme to get your blood sugar levels under control, pulses are best avoided.

The good news is that cutting out starchy foods actually frees you to embark on a diet rich in variety and containing delicious foods you may previously have regarded as off-limits

The good news is that cutting out starchy foods actually frees you to embark on a diet rich in variety and containing delicious foods you may previously have regarded as off-limits

FRUIT

Fruit can raise your blood sugar levels if eaten to excess, but there is a ‘spectrum’ of how sugary fruits are. Generally, berries are very low sugar, while pears, apples, peaches and plums are medium-carb.

But take care with tropical fruits such as bananas, mango and pineapple. Whole fruits are superior to juice as the sugar in juices or smoothies is absorbed faster.

VEGETABLES

Vegetables provide vitamins and minerals and they’re useful for bulking out your meals instead of bread, potatoes, rice and pasta.

But it’s important to differentiate between non-starchy and starchy vegetables, such as carrot, parsnip and beetroot, which have a high sugar content. These can be eaten in restricted amounts; non-starchy veg such as kale, cauliflower, cabbage, aubergine and courgette can be eaten freely.

DAIRY

Dairy contains protein and fat. Hard cheeses, such as parmesan, have one of the highest protein contents — 35g per 100g, compared to 16g in feta. Cheese is calorific so don’t eat too much. Yoghurt is a great option as a pudding but opt for a natural, full-fat version and add your own fruit. At first, Dr Unwin worried about how consuming full-fat dairy and eggs would affect his patients’ cholesterol and other blood fat levels, so he did hundreds of tests. His data actually show average improvements in these levels — the opposite of what he expected.  

Read more at DailyMail.co.uk


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