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Mum Danielle Lincoln reveals she needed 200 stitches after giving birth to huge 5kg baby

Mum reveals she needed 200 stitches after giving birth to huge five kilo: ‘I haven’t been right since’

  • Mum needed 200 stitches after baby’s birth
  • Her first two babies were small and average – her third, huge 

A mother-of-three has revealed she needed ‘200 stitches inside and out’ after the birth of her last baby who weighed a whopping five kilos on delivery.

Danielle Lincoln revealed she was in labour with her third child, a boy, for 24 hours and claimed he ‘split her front and back’ on the way out.

The UK based mum had given birth twice before, with much smaller babies, and was told he would be a little bigger – but had no idea of the painful reality of that.

‘Gave birth at 42 weeks to a toddler the same length as the hospital crib, a head the size of my hand and a double chin,’ she said.

At her 40-week scan she was told to expect a slightly bigger baby than her last, with doctors estimating an arrival weight of 3.6 kilos.

The tiny mum, who is just 155 cm tall said her first babies, both girls, weighed 2.9 kilos and 3.4 kilos respectively ‘and still got stuck’. 

A mum-of-three has made fun of the birth of her third child – which was extremely traumatic

But the birth of her son was nothing short of traumatic. 

‘I almost bled out and they damaged his collar bone the poor baby could only have his head one way for months ,’ she said.

‘My legs and hips and other things have never been right, if there had been communication I’d have had c section at 40 weeks.’

A year on and the mum can finally poke fun of it – she recently made a video showing how far she had to get dilated to give birth. 

Danielle acted out her birth scene from the point of view of her midwife, who had never helped deliver such a big baby.

She was very shocked when she realised how big her baby was

She was very shocked when she realised how big her baby was 

‘We saw the whole thing dude first you were like woah, then we were like woah, then you were like woahhh,’ she said lip-syncing to a popular Finding Nemo scene.

In the clip Danielle held up a dilation ring for the first woah, a larger ring for the second woah and a wastepaper basket for the third, showing how far she had to dilate to get the baby out.

The funny video definitely captured the attention of her audience with dozens of mums chiming in about their own ‘huge’ babies.

‘This was also me! The midwives kept putting my daughter on and off the scales thinking they were broken! Never again,’ said one mum, put off the idea of having any more children.

Her son was supposed to be slightly larger than average - but she didn't realise he would be well over four kilos

Her son was supposed to be slightly larger than average – but she didn’t realise he would be well over four kilos

‘Not even a lie, my first was 4.6 kilos and we could not get a second alone. I felt like a circus performer,’ said another.

One mum whose baby weighed 4.3 kilos described Danielle as a queen and said she ‘wanted to die’ whilst delivering her own larger-than normal baby. 

Others revealed they were grateful their babies ‘came early’.

‘My son was born at 38 weeks and was 4.4 kilos (naturally) so dread to think what he would have been if he was 40 weeks or more,’ one mum said.

Most babies born at full term in Australia weigh between 3.3-3.4 kilos, with bubs over four kilos described as being ‘large’.

What is a ‘normal’ birthweight? 

Nine in ten babies (92%) were born with a normal birthweight (birthweight between 2,500 and 4,499 grams). Around 1% of babies are high birthweight (birthweight of 4,500 grams or more), according to the Australian Institute of Health and Welfare.

Over 1 in 7 (15%) liveborn low birthweight babies weighed less than 1,500 grams and 6.3% of liveborn low birthweight babies weighed less than 1,000 grams.

Pre-term birth is closely linked with low birthweight – over two thirds (70%) of liveborn low birthweight babies were pre-term (gestational age before 37 completed weeks) and more than half (57%) of pre-term babies were of low birthweight.

The proportion of liveborn low birthweight babies was higher among babies born to mothers who lived in the most disadvantaged areas (7.8%) than babies born to mothers who lived in the least disadvantaged areas (5.4%).

Internationally, the proportion of low birthweight babies in Australia in 2018 or nearest year (6.7%), was slightly higher than the OECD average (6.6%).

Source: AIHW 

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