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Music festival boss is jailed for flouting new coronavirus rules by giving officials a fake name

Music festival boss is jailed for flouting new coronavirus rules by giving officials a fake name when he landed on the Isle of Man via private jet

  • Richard Malcolm Powell, 59, gave fake name and wrong date of birth on arrival 
  • He was asked to provide details under new law implemented by the Isle of Man 
  • Powell jailed for ten weeks and fined £2,725 at Douglas Courthouse last week
  • Here’s how to help people impacted by Covid-19

A music festival boss has been jailed after he flouted the Isle of Man’s coronavirus rules by giving officials false details when he landed via private jet. 

Richard Malcolm Powell, 59, gave a fake name as well as an incorrect date of birth, address and telephone number on a landing card when he arrived on the Isle of Man on March 20. 

He was required to provide these details following the implementation of a new law put in place to try and curb the spread of coronavirus, which also told any arrivals to self-isolate for 14 days. 

Powell was arrested on March 26 after concerns were raised by officials at the airport and the information was handed to police.     

Richard Malcolm Powell (pictured), 59, gave a fake name as well as an incorrect date of birth, address and telephone number when he arrived on the Isle of Man on March 20

Appearing at Douglas Courthouse last week, the businessman was jailed for ten weeks and fined £2,725 after breaching the Emergency Powers Act.

The court heard how Powell gave his name as Richard Howell on arrival and, after arousing suspicion, was arrested at Rivendell Cottage in Union Mills six days later.  

Powell was placed in custody on 24 hour lockdown for two weeks but has been on remand for 23 hours in the weeks since.

At court last week, Powell’s barrister Paul Rodgers said his client is an entrepreneur who has made a significant contribution to the island for a number of years.

He added the defendant pays into the top tax bracket and runs the island-based Mannifest music festival, which has raised money for Manx charities.

Mr Rodgers referred to a probation report which stated Powell had provided the incorrect details in order to protect his friend on whose plane he travelled to the island. 

Appearing at Douglas Courthouse (pictured) last week, the businessman was jailed for ten weeks and fined £2,725 for breaching the Emergency Powers Act

Appearing at Douglas Courthouse (pictured) last week, the businessman was jailed for ten weeks and fined £2,725 for breaching the Emergency Powers Act

He said described it as a ‘momentarily bad decision’.

He was handed a custodial sentence via video link by Deputy High Bailiff Chris Arrowsmith.

Mr Arrowsmith said the regulations Powell breached were put in place to protect Manx residents.

He added: ‘His rationale was two-fold – to protect the pilot, who is unnamed, but mostly to avoid detection by the authorities.’

Powell was sentenced to six weeks’ custody for providing false details and four weeks’ custody for a previous crimes, including the theft of a fire extinguisher and a motoring offence. 

Read more at DailyMail.co.uk