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Muslim activist Yassmin Abdel-Magied brings up controversial Anzac Day post again

Activist and writer Yassmin Abdel-Magied has once again referenced a divisive tweet she made on Anzac Day five years ago that saw her flee Australia.

Ms Abdel-Magied was heavily criticised in 2017 after tweeting ‘Lest. We. Forget. (Manus, Nauru, Syria, Palestine)’ on April 25.

She quickly deleted the post and apologised, but many Australians were left outraged she hijacked the national day of remembrance to make a political statement.

On Monday, she brought up the incident with a tweet that read: ‘5 years, ay,’ a reference to the fact it had been five years since her controversial ANZAC Day message.

Yassmin Abdel-Magied has once again referenced a divisive tweet she made on Anzac Day five years ago that saw her flee Australia

Her latest tweet was a reference to the post she made five years ago which saw her essentially be run out of the country

Her latest tweet was a reference to the post she made five years ago which saw her essentially be run out of the country

In Anzac Day of 2020, she wrote ‘Oh, it’s that day I should stay off Twitter again’, and in 2019 she said she ‘used to really like Anzac day’.

In August, 2018 she said: ‘I really wanted to buy an Anzac biscuit at the cafe today, but then…’

Her latest post was flooded with supportive comments, with many Twitter users saying the heavy abuse she copped ‘wasn’t fair’.

‘Yassmin, the stand you took five years ago is still reverberating though our nation. You are an absolute hero to me and thousands of other Australians,’ one replied.

‘I think of you EVERY Anzac Day! The way you were treated was appalling. Hope that you are safe, well and happy,’ tweeted another.

Although for many, the damage done by her 2017 tweet was irreparable.

Ms Abdel-Magied was heavily criticised in 2017 after tweeting 'Lest. We. Forget. (Manus, Nauru, Syria, Palestine)' on April 25

Ms Abdel-Magied was heavily criticised in 2017 after tweeting ‘Lest. We. Forget. (Manus, Nauru, Syria, Palestine)’ on April 25

‘It’s been lovely not having you here. I bet you are happy too, considering this country is apparently the worst place on earth according to you. Your comments on Anzac Day will never be forgiven,’ one said.

‘I think of you whenever I see some nationalist t**t bang on about free speech,’ another commented.

The 2015 Queensland Young Australian the Year quickly replaced her 2017 tweet with an apology after she came under an onslaught of criticism.

‘It was brought to my attention that my last post was disrespectful, and for that, I apologise unreservedly,’ she said.

The self-proclaimed 'Australia's most hated Muslim' apologised for her tweet and deleted it quickly but for many Australians the damage was done

The self-proclaimed ‘Australia’s most hated Muslim’ apologised for her tweet and deleted it quickly but for many Australians the damage was done

In 2018 she tweeted saying she wanted to buy an Anzac biscuit

In 2018 she tweeted saying she wanted to buy an Anzac biscuit

Ms Abdel-Magied, who hosted the ABC’s Australia Wide program at the time, was accused of disrespecting Anzac Day in favour of her own religious agenda. 

‘I love Australia, I’m super patriotic. Yet I feel like I’ve been duped, like I’ve been sold this false sense of belonging,’ she said at the time.

She also revealed in a speech at the Sydney Writers Festival that she had received harsh criticism over the post from a number of politicians.

‘I posted an apology very quickly afterwards, but one of our senior cabinet members said ‘Well Yassmin is un-Australian for saying this’,’ she said.

In 2017, a conservative commentator on Sydney’s 2GB radio station joked about wanting to ‘run over’ Ms Abdel-Magied, after she revealed the death and rape threats she had received.

Ms Abdel-Magied had already left Australia for London by then.

Ms Abdel-Magied, who declared herself at 'Australia's most hated Muslim' later said she felt 'betrayed by my country' following the reaction

Ms Abdel-Magied, who declared herself at ‘Australia’s most hated Muslim’ later said she felt ‘betrayed by my country’ following the reaction

‘She has fled the country and is blaming all of us,’ Prue MacSween told 2GB’s Chris Smith.

‘She says she’s been betrayed by Australia and didn’t feel safe in her own country. Well actually she might have been right there, because if I had seen her I would have been tempted to run her over mate.’

Ms Abdel-Magied, who declared herself at ‘Australia’s most hated Muslim’ later said she felt ‘betrayed by my country’ following the reaction. 

Towards the end of 2017, she likened the criticism she faced in Australia to ‘dating an abusive guy’. 

The activist has referenced her controversial Anzac Day posts over the years

The activist has referenced her controversial Anzac Day posts over the years

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Read more at DailyMail.co.uk