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Muslim parents refuse to let children have flu vaccine ‘because treatment is not halal’

Muslim parents refuse to let their children take part in nationwide flu vaccine drive ‘because treatment is not halal’

  • Nasal spray Fluenz Tetra contains pork gelatine, which is considered to be haram
  • Vegetarian Society raised concerns over the vaccine as recently as last year 
  • Muslim Council of Britain said spray would only be permitted if lives were at risk 

Muslim parents are reportedly refusing to allow their children to have a nasal flu vaccine because the treatment is not halal.

Concerns were first raised over the spray – Fluenz Tetra – containing pork gelatine last year, but the issue has been highlighted again ahead of a new nationwide drive.

At the time, the Vegetarian Society branded the use of the ingredient in three vaccines as ‘disappointing’, while the Muslim Council of Britain said the spray would only be permitted if there was no alternative and lives were at risk.

Next month, every healthy child between two and 10 in England will be offered Fluenz Tetra to increase herd immunity.

Muslim parents are reportedly refusing to allow their children to have a nasal flu vaccine because the treatment is not halal (file photo)

But uptake in areas with a high proportion of practicing Muslims is ‘significantly lower’ than the average, reports the Telegraph.

Dr Shuja Shafi, the chairman of the Muslim Council of Britain’s research and documentation committee, said: ‘We have consulted the scholars and this is their view… we need another vaccine which is halal.’

Last year Dr Shafi urged doctors to find a ‘long-term solution’ to the issue. Two other vaccines, MMR VaxPro and Zostavax, also contain gelatine.

An injectable version of the spray which does not contain pork gelatine, which is considered haram, exists but is currently only given to high-risk children.

The alternative is said to be ‘less effective’ as it does less to reduce flu spreading and can require two doses.     

Dr Mary Ramsay, head of immunisation at PHE, told the Telegraph: ‘Our first priority is to ensure that vaccines are safe and effective… PHE encourages parents to seek advice from their faith or community leaders to inform their decision.’ 

Concerns were first raised over the spray - Fluenz Tetra - containing pork gelatine last year, but the issue has been highlighted again ahead of a new nationwide drive (file photo)

Concerns were first raised over the spray – Fluenz Tetra – containing pork gelatine last year, but the issue has been highlighted again ahead of a new nationwide drive (file photo)

Read more at DailyMail.co.uk


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