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Naga Munchetty shows off her rarely seen legs in skimpy cycling shorts during day out in Manchester

Naga Munchetty, 47, ditches the designer dresses as BBC Breakfast presenter shows off her rarely seen legs in skimpy cycling shorts during day out in Manchester

The tailored shirts and high-slung skirts were left in the BBC wardrobe on Friday as Naga Munchetty opted for something a little more sporty while out in Manchester. 

Better known for her undeniably smart, businesslike appearance on the BBC Breakfast sofa, Naga showed off her legs in a pair of skintight cycling shorts. 

It was a marked change for the 47-year old presenter, whose legs are usually hidden behind the studio desk during her daily appearances on the live news roundup alongside conservatively dressed co-host Charlie Stayt.

The usual: Naga as fans are used to seeing her (pictured at the Attitude Pride Awards in 2018)

All change: The tailored shirts and high-slung skirts were left in the BBC wardrobe on Friday as Naga Munchetty opted for something a little more sporty while out in Manchester

She added to her look with a matching black tracksuit top and running shoes, while a lightweight rucksack was slung across her back. 

The presenter, an avid golfer, stays fit by jogging regularly, but she recently admitted to suffering an unfortunate wardrobe malfunction after her sports bra while she was out on a run. 

She told the Daily Mail: ‘Luckily, I was wearing a top that meant I could just fasten it back up underneath and hope that it didn’t happen again. 

‘Bra makers beware — make better zips. You do always worry about it.’ 

Toned and trim: Better known for her undeniably smart, businesslike appearance on the BBC Breakfast sofa, Naga showed off her legs in a pair of skintight cycling shorts

Finishing touch: She added to her look with a matching black tracksuit top and running shoes, while a lightweight rucksack was slung across her back

Toned and trim: Better known for her undeniably smart, businesslike appearance on the BBC Breakfast sofa, Naga showed off her legs in a pair of skintight cycling shorts

That's more like it: It was a marked change for the presenter, whose legs are usually hidden behind the studio desk during her daily appearances on BBC Breakfast with Charlie Stayt

That’s more like it: It was a marked change for the presenter, whose legs are usually hidden behind the studio desk during her daily appearances on BBC Breakfast with Charlie Stayt

BBC Breakfast host Naga previously admitted to ‘hiding’ her Asian heritage in the past in a bid to fit in.

The presenter, who appeared on Strictly Come Dancing in 2016, has admitted she tried to distance herself from her Asian background during her younger years.

She told the BBC: ‘I know what it’s like to hide parts of my whole self, to play down my Asian heritage – it’s difficult to acknowledge that I’ve done it, and hard to admit. Since I was young, I felt I needed to, so that I fitted-in more easily.’

Speaking out: BBC Breakfast host Naga previously admitted to 'hiding' her Asian heritage in the past in a bid to fit in

Speaking out: BBC Breakfast host Naga previously admitted to ‘hiding’ her Asian heritage in the past in a bid to fit in 

Popular: Naga is part of the presenting team on BBC Breakfast, having joined the show in 2009, before becoming a main presenter in 2014 (pictured with Prime Minister Boris Johnson)

Popular: Naga is part of the presenting team on BBC Breakfast, having joined the show in 2009, before becoming a main presenter in 2014 (pictured with Prime Minister Boris Johnson)

Naga discussed how she first encountered racism as a seven-year-old, with the experience sticking with her ever since.

‘I have experienced racism,’ she said. ‘You never forget the first time you hear that painful and distressing word. I was seven, when someone I thought was a friend at school, told me we could no longer hang out.

‘They used the p-word, making clear the reason was because of the colour of my skin. The sense of shame was overwhelming.

‘I was told I didn’t belong when up until then I assumed I did. From that moment I knew I was seen as different. That first hurt never goes away.’

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Read more at DailyMail.co.uk