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Nazi symbols posted outside Jewish temple on the Gold Coast

Nazi symbols of hate posted outside a Jewish place of worship on the day it meets to remember victims of the Holocaust

  • Flyers with swastikas and anti-Jewish slurs put on pole outside Temple Shalom 
  • The attack happened as the community gathered to remember the Holocaust
  • A person whose family survived the Holocaust was among those targeted
  • Treasurer Josh Frydenberg, who is Jewish, was also targeted in the vile attack 

An Australian Jewish community has been subjected to a despicable anti-Semitic attack on the day it gathered at a temple to remember the Holocaust. 

Flyers with swastikas and vile anti-Jewish slurs were put on a pole outside Temple Shalom in Isle of Capri on the Gold Coast on Sunday.

Copies of the flyers – which also attacked Treasurer Josh Frydenberg, who is Jewish – were also put in the letter boxes of local houses, including to a person whose family survived the Holocaust. 

Rabbi Adi Cohen said the attack would ‘generate fear’ among members of the community. 

A swastika was featured on one of the vile flyers used to attack a Jewish community on the Gold Coast

The leaflets were posted as the community gathered to mark Yom HaShoah – Holocaust Remembrance Day.

Six million Jews were killed in the Holocaust.  

The person whose family survived the Holocaust said they were now considering moving to Israel with their family and that Australia is no longer safe for Jews. 

The hate attack also referred to the federal election campaign. Slurs on the leaflets said Australian politics is ‘dominated by Jews’ and Scott Morrison is their ‘puppet’.

It accompanied pictures of Treasurer Frydenberg along with other cabinet members. 

‘It is a great shame that the Treasurer of our country has to be offered close personal protection, not because he’s the Treasurer but because he’s a Jew,’ Mr Morrison told parliament last November when Mr Frydenberg beefed up his security. 

But Rabbi Cohen said the Temple Shalom community would not be intimidated.

Temple Shalom (pictured) in Isle of Capri on the Gold Coast was targeted by anti-Semites

Temple Shalom (pictured) in Isle of Capri on the Gold Coast was targeted by anti-Semites

Vile anti-Semitic flyers (pictured) were taped to a pole across from a Jewish temple (pictured in background)

Vile anti-Semitic flyers (pictured) were taped to a pole across from a Jewish temple (pictured in background)

‘The days that the Jews were victims are over,’ he told News Corp. 

‘I will not be intimidated. I will not give up to terrorism or to fear … This is a place of sanctuary, a place of worship and spirituality, not a place of fear and hate.’

Rabbi Cohen said the it was important to note the attack happened during the federal election campaign. 

A poster (pictured) used despicable anti-Semitic slurs to attack a Jewish community in Queensland, and also members of the federal government

A poster (pictured) used despicable anti-Semitic slurs to attack a Jewish community in Queensland, and also members of the federal government

‘Whether it is directed to Jews, to Muslims, to Chinese or any other ethnicity or religion, it is plain and simple, unacceptable in Australian society.’

The use of a swastika is not currently illegal in Queensland, but the issue is being reviewed.

A report to the state parliament in February recommended making the display of hate symbols such as the swastika a criminal offence. 

Adi Cohen (pictured) is the rabbi of a Gold Coast temple that was targeted in an anti-Semitic attack on a day the community gathered to remember the Holocaust

Adi Cohen (pictured) is the rabbi of a Gold Coast temple that was targeted in an anti-Semitic attack on a day the community gathered to remember the Holocaust

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