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Nearly two-thirds of Americans say Donald Trump has further divided the country: Poll 

Nearly two-thirds of Americans say Donald Trump has further divided the country as the president continues to slide in the polls coming 15 points behind Joe Biden: Poll

  • Nearly two-thirds, or 61 per cent, of Americans feel that Donald Trump has further divided the country during his presidency 
  • This is far higher than the number of Americans who said his two predecessors divided the nation when they were in office
  • In the same poll, 55 per cent of Americans said they would vote for presumed Democratic nominee Joe Biden 
  • This is 15 percentage points more than the 40 per cent who said they would cast their ballot for the president in November

A new poll released Sunday morning shows that 61 per cent of Americans believe President Donald Trump has done more to divide the country than his two predecessors.

In the ABC News/Washington Post poll, 35 per cent of 1,006 respondents said Trump has united the country during his presidency, while 61 per cent say he has further divided the nation.

The same poll also revealed that among registered voters, of which there were 845 surveyed in the poll, 55 per cent would vote for Biden, the presumed Democratic nominee, if the election were held today.

Forty per cent of registered voters said they would cast their ballot for the president.

Trump retains support from 90 per cent of registered voters who voted for him in 2016, according to the poll – but he loses 8 per cent of them to Biden.

Biden, on the other hand, takes 95 per cent of those who supported loser Hillary Clinton in 2016, but 3 per cent of those voters flipped to Trump.

Nearly two-thirds, or 61 per cent, of Americans feel that Donald Trump has further divided the country during his presidency 

Barack Obama

George W. Bush

In similar polls taken during Trump’s two predecessor’s terms, 43 per cent said then-outgoing President Barack Obama (left) did more to divide than unite the country while 55 per cent of Americans at the times said then-President George W. Bush (right) had divided the country

In the same poll, 55 per cent of Americans said they would vote for presumed Democratic nominee Joe Biden, who served as Obama's vice president

In the same poll, 55 per cent of Americans said they would vote for presumed Democratic nominee Joe Biden, who served as Obama’s vice president

When questioned on which candidate would do more to unite Americans the next four years in the White House, 57 per cent of Americans said Biden was likely to do more while only 33 per cent said Trump would bring a uniting force if reelected.

The response comes as Trump has faced criticism for his response to massive nationwide Black Lives Matter protests and riots that broke out following the death of George Floyd at the end of May and have continued into July.

The president has also come under fire for his underwhelming response to the coronavirus pandemic, which continues to ravage the nation with more than 3.7 million confirmed cases in the U.S. and more than 140,000 deaths.

More than half of Americans said they trust Biden more to handle the COVID-19 crisis and cases continue to surge, while 34 per cent say they trust Trump.

The economy and employment rates have suffered in the midst of the pandemic, and 47 per cent of Americans feel Trump would be better equipped to handle the economy compared to the 45 per cent who feel Biden would do better with economic recovery.

In Sunday’s poll, 30 per cent of respondents identify as Democrat or left-leaning, 24 per cent as Republican or right-leaning and the majority, at 39 per cent, claim they are independents.

The survey has a margin of error of 3.5 percentage points among Americans and 4 percentage points among registered voters.

Trump’s rating on uniting the country from the poll falls behind his two predecessors, President Barack Obama and President George W. Bush.

In November 2016, when Trump had already been elected, 50 per cent of Americans said then-outgoing President Barack Obama had united the country and 43 per cent said otherwise while 7 per cent had no opinion.

In June 2005, 43 per cent of Americans said then-President George W. Bush had brought the country together and 55 per cent said he had divided it.



Read more at DailyMail.co.uk