News, Culture & Society

New York City hosts 3 MILLION people to celebrate the historic WorldPride celebrations

A staggering three million people hit the streets of Manhattan on Sunday for the WorldPride parade marking the 50th anniversary of the Stonewall riots, which are credited with giving rise to the modern LGBTQI+ civil rights movement.

The global Gay Pride celebration commemorates the June 28, 1969 riots sparked by repeated police raids on the Stonewall Inn in New York’s Greenwich Village, which had become known as a well-known refuge for the gay community.

What is now referred to as the ‘Stonewall Riots’ proved to be a turning point in the lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer, intersex, et cetera (LGBTQI+) community’s struggle for civil rights.

Two marches took place, but the official WorldPride procession began at noon from 5th Avenue and 26th Street in Greenwich Village, amounting to what might have been the largest ever public event New York City has ever seen, according to Secret NYC.

Due to intense crowding on the West Side of the city, both the Christopher Street and the West 4th Street-Washington Square stations have been closed to incoming passengers as of 3.30pm Eastern, operating as exits only, according to transportation officials. 

Ahead of the festivities, Mayor Bill de Blasio who has been a vocal defender of gay rights and is also a Democratic presidential candidate hopeful, said on Friday night: ‘I believe we are going to have the greatest Pride celebration in the history of the globe.’

New York Governor Andrew Cuomo used the WorldPride parade as a stage to sign a bill outlawing the ‘gay and trans panic’ defense, which has historically been used to ‘mitigate a case of murder down to manslaughter or to justify a homicide’ after a perpetrator claims to have injured anLGBTQI+ person out of shock at learning of their sexuality or gender identity.

While WorldPride events were held around the globe on Sunday, including the first ever event of its kind in Macedonia, Chicago’s Pride parade had to be canceled due to severe whether shortly before 4pm Eastern, before 40-50 floats were even able to make it onto the route.

 

Three million people donning rainbow colors crammed the streets of Manhattan on Sunday for the WorldPride Gay Pride parade marking the 50th anniversary of the Stonewall riots. A man is shown kissing a person dressed in gold and sequins during WorldPride events in New York City on Sunday

The global Gay Pride celebration commemorates the June 28, 1969 riots sparked by repeated police raids on the Stonewall Inn, a well-known refuge for the gay community in New York's Greenwich Village. Participants hold balloons in the shape of the number 50 while taking part in the WorldPride parade in New York City on Sunday, commemorating the 50th Anniversary of the Stonewall Uprising which occurred on June 28, 1969

The global Gay Pride celebration commemorates the June 28, 1969 riots sparked by repeated police raids on the Stonewall Inn, a well-known refuge for the gay community in New York’s Greenwich Village. Participants hold balloons in the shape of the number 50 while taking part in the WorldPride parade in New York City on Sunday, commemorating the 50th Anniversary of the Stonewall Uprising which occurred on June 28, 1969

Two marches took place, but the official WorldPride procession began at noon from 5th Avenue and 26th Street in Greenwich Village. People are shown wearing bright colors and smiling from ear to ear during the WorldPride parade in New York City on Sunday

Two marches took place, but the official WorldPride procession began at noon from 5th Avenue and 26th Street in Greenwich Village. People are shown wearing bright colors and smiling from ear to ear during the WorldPride parade in New York City on Sunday

Two people dressed in rainbow stripes, tie dye and red were photographed kissing during WordPride events in New York City on Sunday

Two people dressed in rainbow stripes, tie dye and red were photographed kissing during WordPride events in New York City on Sunday

Famed fashion designer Donatello Versace waves to a passersby from behind a red barrier while wearing a dress made of rainbow-colored sequins

Famed fashion designer Donatello Versace waves to a passersby from behind a red barrier while wearing a dress made of rainbow-colored sequins

This year organizers have gone all out as Manhattan has been selected to host WorldPride with visitors from around the globe. A couple kisses before Gay Pride activities on Sunday in New York City

This year organizers have gone all out as Manhattan has been selected to host WorldPride with visitors from around the globe. A couple kisses before Gay Pride activities on Sunday in New York City

Transgender actors and Grand Marshalls Dominique Jackson (left), Indya Moore (center) and MJ Rodriguez (right) take part in the 2019 WorldPride parade in honor of the 50th anniversary of the Stonewall riots in New York on Sunday

Talk show host Wendy Williams made an appearance at the WorldPride parade in a pastel rainbow jumpsuit, accessorizing with oversized rose-colored glasses and a diamond-encrusted 'W' necklace

Talk show host Wendy Williams made an appearance at the WorldPride parade in a pastel rainbow jumpsuit, accessorizing with oversized rose-colored glasses and a diamond-encrusted ‘W’ necklace

Williams was perched on a blue seat and waved to the crowds lining the roadways as the procession made it way towards Times Square during WorldPride in New York City on Sunday

Williams was perched on a blue seat and waved to the crowds lining the roadways as the procession made it way towards Times Square during WorldPride in New York City on Sunday

Transgender actors and Dominique Jackson, Indya Moore and MJ Rodriguez served as Grand Marshalls of the WorldPride parade on Sunday. 

New York Governor Andrew Cuomo appeared at the WorldPride event, where he brought the Empire State in line with llinois, California, Connecticut, Rhode Island and Nevada by signing a bill into law that does away with the ‘gay and trans panic’ defense in murder cases.  

Hundreds cheered as Cuomo, 61, told the crowd this ‘ends the justification of homophobia’ while affixing his signature to Bill A2707.

The ‘gay and trans panic’ defense refers to those accused of a crime against an LGBTQI+ claiming their responsibilty for their actions should be mitigated because they acted while under extreme emotional distress after learning their victim’s sexual or gender identity. 

It’s historically been used to ‘mitigate a case of murder down to manslaughter or to justify a homicide,’ according to LGBTQ Bar.  

New York State Attorney General Letitia James walked in the parade in front of a rainbow-striped banner bearing her name. 

New York Governor Andrew Cuomo signed a bill outlawing the 'gay and trans panic' defense at the WorldPride parade in New York City on Sunday. The defense has historically been used to 'mitigate a case of murder down to manslaughter or to justify a homicide'

New York Governor Andrew Cuomo signed a bill outlawing the ‘gay and trans panic’ defense at the WorldPride parade in New York City on Sunday. The defense has historically been used to ‘mitigate a case of murder down to manslaughter or to justify a homicide’

New York State Attorney General Letitia James walkes in the 2019 WorldPride parade in honor of the and Stonewall 50th anniversary in New York City on Sunday

New York State Attorney General Letitia James walkes in the 2019 WorldPride parade in honor of the and Stonewall 50th anniversary in New York City on Sunday

US Senator for New York Chuck Schumer carried a bullhorn and walked in WorldPride parade on Sunday in Manhattan

US Senator for New York Chuck Schumer carried a bullhorn and walked in WorldPride parade on Sunday in Manhattan

WorldPride might have been the largest ever public event New York City has ever seen, according to Secret NYC. Due to intense crowding on the West Side of the city, both Christopher Street  stations has been closed to incoming passengers as of 3.30pm Eastern, operating as an exit only, according to transportation officials

The West 4th Street-Washington Square station is also an exit-only station now

WorldPride might have been the largest ever public event New York City has ever seen, according to Secret NYC. Due to intense crowding on the West Side of the city, both the Christopher Street and the West 4th Street-Washington Square stations have been closed to incoming passengers as of 3.30pm Eastern, operating as exits only, according to transportation officials

US Senator Chuck Schumer also walked in the parade on Sunday, carrying a bullhorn and with supports who held signs that read, ‘Senator Schumer supports the LGBTQ+ community.’  

Famed fashion designer Donatello Versace was also in attendance, waving to passersby from behind a red barrier while wearing a dress made of rainbow-colored sequins. 

Talk show host Wendy Williams made an appearance at the WorldPride parade in a pastel rainbow jumpsuit, accessorizing with oversized rose-colored glasses and a diamond-encrusted ‘W’ necklace. 

Of the many people dressed in drag at the event, one person chose to mimic the appearance of Queen Elizabeth II while marching in the WorldPride parade.   

A rainbow-printed umbrella is carried by a person wearing  a matching coat during in WorldPride in New York City on Sunday

A rainbow-printed umbrella is carried by a person wearing  a matching coat during in WorldPride in New York City on Sunday

Of the many people dressed in drag at the event, one person chose to mimic the appearance of Queen Elizabeth II while marching in the WorldPride parade

Of the many people dressed in drag at the event, one person chose to mimic the appearance of Queen Elizabeth II while marching in the WorldPride parade

Another person taking part in the parade dressed in drag wearing a voluminous blonde wig with flowing curls, and a flamingo pink outfit

Another person taking part in the parade dressed in drag wearing a voluminous blonde wig with flowing curls, and a flamingo pink outfit

Another person marched with a vanity around the waist and cosmetics spanning out, suspended in the air with wires

Another person marched with a vanity around the waist and cosmetics spanning out, suspended in the air with wires

A person dressed in a stunning purple sequin gown holding a fan that reads 'Shade' is pictured taking part in WorldPride in New York City on Sunday

A person dressed in a stunning purple sequin gown holding a fan that reads ‘Shade’ is pictured taking part in WorldPride in New York City on Sunday

New York’s Gay Pride has evolved over the years into a month of events commemorating the Stonewall riots, drawing hundreds of thousands of people, plus politicians and celebrities.

In 1970, one year after the riots 50 years ago, New York held its first Gay Pride march, kicking off a tradition that would spread to other cities around the world.

The movement remains necessary to this day, as some 70 countries still criminalize homosexuality.

This year organizers went all out as Manhattan was selected to host WorldPride since it was the site of the Stonewall riots, with visitors pouring in from around the globe. There were 677 contingents in the official parade,including community groups, major corporations and cast members from FX’s ‘Pose.’

The global Gay Pride celebration commemorates the June 28, 1969 riots sparked by repeated police raids on the Stonewall Inn in New York's Greenwich Village (pictured)

The global Gay Pride celebration commemorates the June 28, 1969 riots sparked by repeated police raids on the Stonewall Inn in New York’s Greenwich Village (pictured) 

A sign reading 'We the people means everyone' is being held by a person taking part in WorldPride in New York City on Sunday

 A sign reading ‘We the people means everyone’ is being held by a person taking part in WorldPride in New York City on Sunday 

The Garden State Girls-Women on Wheels club gather before the WorldPride parade New York City on Sunday

The Garden State Girls-Women on Wheels club gather before the WorldPride parade New York City on Sunday

People dressed in rainbow-colored Native American garb are pictured during WorldPride in New York City on Sunday

People dressed in rainbow-colored Native American garb are pictured during WorldPride in New York City on Sunday

A massive rainbow flag is unfurled by a group marching together in the 2019 WorldPride parade in New York City on Sunday

A massive rainbow flag is unfurled by a group marching together in the 2019 WorldPride parade in New York City on Sunday

A person with the word 'warrior' painted across the rib cage and wearing what appears to be mock armor is pictured marching in the WorldPride parade in New York City on Sunday

A person with the word ‘warrior’ painted across the rib cage and wearing what appears to be mock armor is pictured marching in the WorldPride parade in New York City on Sunday

This year organizers have gone all out as Manhattan has been selected to host WorldPride since it was the site of the Stonewall riots, with visitors pouring in from around the globe. Participants in the WorldPride parade in New York City on Sunday are shown

This year organizers have gone all out as Manhattan has been selected to host WorldPride since it was the site of the Stonewall riots, with visitors pouring in from around the globe. Participants in the WorldPride parade in New York City on Sunday are shown

The event comes against what critics say is Donald Trump's Republican administration opening the door once again to overt discrimination against the LGBTQ community. People are shown participating in the WorldPride parade on Sunday in New York City

The event comes against what critics say is Donald Trump’s Republican administration opening the door once again to overt discrimination against the LGBTQ community. People are shown participating in the WorldPride parade on Sunday in New York City

A balloon arch is carried down Fifth Avenue by people taking part in WorldPride in New York City on Sunday

A balloon arch is carried down Fifth Avenue by people taking part in WorldPride in New York City on Sunday

Balloon art made in the shape of flamingos are carried by people taking part in WorldPride in New York City on Sunday

Balloon art made in the shape of flamingos are carried by people taking part in WorldPride in New York City on Sunday

WorldPride specific events kicked off in New York on June 26 with an opening ceremony at the Barclays Center in Brooklyn, and went non-stop through to the parade on Sunday afternoon. 

The event comes against what critics say is Donald Trump’s Republican administration opening the door once again to overt discrimination against the LGBTQ community.

Some 150,000 people signed up to walk in the main march, with 70 companies acting as sponsors. 

Some 150,000 people signed up to walk in the main march, with 70 companies acting as sponsors. People are shown marching

Some 150,000 people signed up to walk in the main march, with 70 companies acting as sponsors. People are shown marching

Thousands lined the streets on Sunday to watch the WorldPride parade on Sunday in New York City, as well. People are shown participating

Thousands lined the streets on Sunday to watch the WorldPride parade on Sunday in New York City, as well. People are shown participating

Two people dressed in every color of the rainbow are shown riding a motorcycle during the WorldPride parade on Sunday in New York City

Two people dressed in every color of the rainbow are shown riding a motorcycle during the WorldPride parade on Sunday in New York City

Pride style: The Real Housewives are showing their support for the LGBTQ+ community

Pride style: The Real Housewives are showing their support for the LGBTQ+ community

Bravo TV Real Housewives stars Teresa Giudice and Sonja Morgan donned sequins and glitter as they hit the parade with their co-stars on Sunday. 

They were joined by fellow Real Housewives of New Jersey stars Dorinda Medley, Margaret Josephs and Melissa Gorga.

Real Housewives from other cities also made the trip, like Kelly Dodd (Orange County), LeeAnne Locken (Dallas), Gizelle Bryant (Potomac), Tinsley Mortimer (New York), Eva Marcille and Cynthia Bailey (Atlanta). 

Southern Charm star Patricia Altschul, Below Deck Mediterranean’s Captain Sandy Yawn and Reza Farahan from Shahs of Sunset were also in attendance to ride on the Bravo float.

The group converged at a Manhattan bar as they pre-gamed for the float.

It appears Josephs might have mistaken Altschul for Lisa Vanderpump, as she tagged the Vanderpump Rules star in her story. 

Rainbow vibes: Dorinda Medley wore a decorative rainbow headpiece with her sequined wrap dress

Rainbow vibes: Dorinda Medley wore a decorative rainbow headpiece with her sequined wrap dress

Atlanta in the house: Cynthia Bailey from Real Housewives of Atlanta also made the trip for World Pride

Atlanta in the house: Cynthia Bailey from Real Housewives of Atlanta also made the trip for World Pride

Strike a pose: Tinsley Mortimer posted a photo of her head-to-toe rainbow look before heading out to meet her Bravo family

Strike a pose: Tinsley Mortimer posted a photo of her head-to-toe rainbow look before heading out to meet her Bravo family

Vanderpump is in Kentucky this weekend for Jax Taylor and and Brittany Cartwright’s wedding. 

Although, Bravo mogul Andy Cohen ensured there would be drag impersonators of Lisa Vanderpump and Lisa Rinna on the float. 

He also posted a boomerang of himself cooling off with a Vanderpump hand fan. 

Cohen said of the float: ‘The float is going to break Gay Pride. It really is. It’s basically my baby shower, but on a float.’ 

Man of the hour: After some celebratory drinks, the group walked to the float, where they were joined by Andy Cohen

Man of the hour: After some celebratory drinks, the group walked to the float, where they were joined by Andy Cohen

What a drag: As promised by Cohen, the float came complete with drag impersonators of some of our favorite Real Housewives

What a drag: As promised by Cohen, the float came complete with drag impersonators of some of our favorite Real Housewives

Bravo Pride: The multi-level float was filled with Bravo stars and fans, and it featured the word 'LOVE' in rainbow colors, with the Bravo logo in place of the O

Bravo Pride: The multi-level float was filled with Bravo stars and fans, and it featured the word ‘LOVE’ in rainbow colors, with the Bravo logo in place of the O

After some celebratory drinks, the group walked to the float, where they were joined by Cohen and RHOA star NeNe Leakes.

A video from Giudice’s story shows Cohen and Leakes dancing under a rainbow umbrella, hiding from the sun. 

The multi-level float was filled with Bravo stars and fans, and it featured the word ‘LOVE’ in rainbow colors, with the Bravo logo in place of the O.  

L’Oreal, Danone and Macy’s department stores are among the corporate participants, a sign of how more and more businesses want to be associated with the yearly procession.

Organizers estimated three million people lined the streets to watch the march, which concluded with a big bash in Times Square.

With so many taking part in the event, police deployed thousands of officers on the streets and rooftops of the city, and also used drones and helicopters to ensure everyone’s safety.

The global Gay Pride celebration commemorates the June 28, 1969 riots sparked by repeated police raids on the Stonewall Inn, a well-known refuge for the gay community in New York's Greenwich Village. People are shown gathered outside the Stonewall Inn on Sunday

The global Gay Pride celebration commemorates the June 28, 1969 riots sparked by repeated police raids on the Stonewall Inn, a well-known refuge for the gay community in New York’s Greenwich Village. People are shown gathered outside the Stonewall Inn on Sunday

What we now refer to as the 'Stonewall Riots' proved to be a turning point in the LGBTQI+ community's struggle for civil rights. People are gathered outside the Stonewall Inn on Sunday

What we now refer to as the ‘Stonewall Riots’ proved to be a turning point in the LGBTQI+ community’s struggle for civil rights. People are gathered outside the Stonewall Inn on Sunday

Organizers say they are expecting an estimated three million people to line the streets and watch the march, which is scheduled to conclude with a big bash in Times Square. A man poses at a New York City Fire Department station on Sunday

Organizers say they are expecting an estimated three million people to line the streets and watch the march, which is scheduled to conclude with a big bash in Times Square. A man poses at a New York City Fire Department station on Sunday

The man who was shown posing with firefighters is pictured again, dressed in the same thong and matching sequin socks while rollerskating ahead of the alternative march for Gay Pride on Sunday

The man who was shown posing with firefighters is pictured again, dressed in the same thong and matching sequin socks while rollerskating ahead of the alternative march for Gay Pride on Sunday

With so many people expected to watch the march, police plan to deploy thousands of officers on the streets and rooftops of the city, and also use drones and helicopters to ensure everyone's safety

With so many people expected to watch the march, police plan to deploy thousands of officers on the streets and rooftops of the city, and also use drones and helicopters to ensure everyone’s safety

There are two marches planned with the main procession beginning at noon from 5th Avenue and 26th Street in Greenwich Village. People are gathered outside Stonewall Inn on Sunday

There are two marches planned with the main procession beginning at noon from 5th Avenue and 26th Street in Greenwich Village. People are gathered outside Stonewall Inn on Sunday

A person is shown wearing a tee shirt that reads, 'Pride breaking barriers' ahead of the WorldPride parade in New York City on Sunday

A person is shown wearing a tee shirt that reads, ‘Pride breaking barriers’ ahead of the WorldPride parade in New York City on Sunday

One criticism of the heavily sponsored event, however, is the strict regulations that been placed on it.

Ann Northrop, one organizer of the alternative event called the Queer Liberation March, wrote in an opinion piece published by NBC News: ‘In New York City, the parade now excludes individuals who want to join in spontaneously, a hallmark of the first marches which openly encouraged onlookers to join the throng. 

‘Today, you can no longer step off the sidewalk and into the street. Police barricades keep the parade free of anyone not appropriately badged and permitted.’

One criticism of the heavily sponsored event, however, is the strict regulations that been placed on it

One criticism of the heavily sponsored event, however, is the strict regulations that been placed on it

Ann Northrop, one organizer of the alternative event called the Queer Liberation March, wrote in an opinion piece published by NBC News : 'In New York City, the parade now excludes individuals who want to join in spontaneously, a hallmark of the first marches which openly encouraged onlookers to join the throng'

Ann Northrop, one organizer of the alternative event called the Queer Liberation March, wrote in an opinion piece published by NBC News : ‘In New York City, the parade now excludes individuals who want to join in spontaneously, a hallmark of the first marches which openly encouraged onlookers to join the throng’

'Today, you can no longer step off the sidewalk and into the street. Police barricades keep the parade free of anyone not appropriately badged and permitted,' Northrop wrote.  A dog wearing a rainbow scarf is pictured on Sunday during WorldPride in New York City

‘Today, you can no longer step off the sidewalk and into the street. Police barricades keep the parade free of anyone not appropriately badged and permitted,’ Northrop wrote.  A dog wearing a rainbow scarf is pictured on Sunday during WorldPride in New York City

On-lookers are shown pressed up against barricades watching as the WorldPride parade goes by on Sunday in New York City

On-lookers are shown pressed up against barricades watching as the WorldPride parade goes by on Sunday in New York City

A person behind the barricade during the WorldPride parade on Sunday held a sign that read, 'I adore my lesbian daughters, keep them safe'

A person behind the barricade during the WorldPride parade on Sunday held a sign that read, ‘I adore my lesbian daughters, keep them safe’

From the behind the barricade during the WorldPride parade in New York City on Sunday, a person rested a child wearing a tutu and unicorn horn headband on the railing

From the behind the barricade during the WorldPride parade in New York City on Sunday, a person rested a child wearing a tutu and unicorn horn headband on the railing

An aerial picture of participants in the Queer Liberation March is shown, which kicked off before the WorldPride parade on Sunday

An aerial picture of participants in the Queer Liberation March is shown, which kicked off before the WorldPride parade on Sunday

In addition to highlighting the fact that corporate sponsorship means little without meaningful everyday action like being visibly supportive all year round, hiring LGBTQI+ people and ensuring an equal workplace, Northrop wrote:

‘We need to remember why we’re fighting, because our fights are far from over. Trump has said he supports us, but his actions betray his true agenda — canceling non-discrimination protections, appointing anti-LGBTQ judges, elevating the bigoted religious right-wing. 

‘Governments around the world, like Iran and Saudi Arabia, threaten us with the death penalty. We are arrested, beaten up, killed and discriminated against in hundreds of ways from New York City to Alabama to Brazil and Chechnya.

‘We need to keep empowering ourselves. We need to educate and activate new generations. We need to be back in the streets, celebrating our victories, mourning our losses, committing to the ongoing battles, marching for our lives.’

The Queer Liberation March will run along the original route taken in 1970, which was called the 'Christopher Street Liberation Day March,' starting at the Stonewall Inn at 53 Christopher Street near the intersection of West 4th Street and 7th Avenue South. Marchers stand behind a banner that reads,'We resist,' in New York City on Sunday

The Queer Liberation March will run along the original route taken in 1970, which was called the ‘Christopher Street Liberation Day March,’ starting at the Stonewall Inn at 53 Christopher Street near the intersection of West 4th Street and 7th Avenue South. Marchers stand behind a banner that reads,’We resist,’ in New York City on Sunday

The Queer Liberation March will run up Sixth Avenue and end on the Great Lawn of Central Park. A person is shown in an elaborate outfit commemorating the 50th anniversary of the Stonewall riots in New York City

The Queer Liberation March will run up Sixth Avenue and end on the Great Lawn of Central Park. A person is shown in an elaborate outfit commemorating the 50th anniversary of the Stonewall riots in New York City

A person in an outfit including modified versions of the Statue of Liberty is shown marching on Sunday

A person in an outfit including modified versions of the Statue of Liberty is shown marching on Sunday

People with painted faces and statements showing trans pride are pictured during a  march in New York City on Sunday

People with painted faces and statements showing trans pride are pictured during a  march in New York City on Sunday

A person wearing makeup and  large wig with colorful accessories and clothing is shown marching during Gay Pride activities on Sunday in New York City

A person wearing makeup and  large wig with colorful accessories and clothing is shown marching during Gay Pride activities on Sunday in New York City

That event ran along the original route taken in 1970, which was called the ‘Christopher Street Liberation Day March,’ starting at the Stonewall Inn at 53 Christopher Street near the intersection of West 4th Street and 7th Avenue South.

It went all the way up Sixth Avenue and ended on the Great Lawn of Central Park. 

‘We’ll hold a powerful rally with speakers and performers. No corporate floats, no squadron of uniformed police,’ Northrop wrote, ahead of the protest.

A person is shown holding a cross and standing on a speaker ahead of the 'We resist' banner at the Queer Liberation March on Sunday in New York City

A person is shown holding a cross and standing on a speaker ahead of the ‘We resist’ banner at the Queer Liberation March on Sunday in New York City

Two people with inflatable rainbow flotation devices are shown marching in the Queer Liberation March on Sunday in New York City

Two people with inflatable rainbow flotation devices are shown marching in the Queer Liberation March on Sunday in New York City

As for the official WorldPride event, the finale took place in the heart of Manhattan at Times Square with performances by artists including Madonna, who is hugely popular in the gay community. 

People also gathered on Sunday around the globe to take part in WorldPride, like in India and Turkey.  

North Macedonia held its first Gay Pride march on Saturday. In Singapore, marchers called for scrapping a law banning gay sex. 

Activities in India were held in the city of Chennai, with many turning out in colorful garb and holding rainbow-decorated signs. 

People also gathered on Sunday around the globe to take part in WorldPride, like in India and Turkey. A participant in Chennai, India is shown

People also gathered on Sunday around the globe to take part in WorldPride, like in India and Turkey. A participant in Chennai, India is shown

One sign in Chennai, India read: 'There's nothing wrong with you. There's a lot wrong with the world you live in'

One sign in Chennai, India read: ‘There’s nothing wrong with you. There’s a lot wrong with the world you live in’

Others in India took the opportunity to call attention to affirmative consent with a mnemonic device using the word 'fries,' which read, 'I love consent. Freely given, Reversible, Informed, Enthusiastic, Specific'

Others in India took the opportunity to call attention to affirmative consent with a mnemonic device using the word ‘fries,’ which read, ‘I love consent. Freely given, Reversible, Informed, Enthusiastic, Specific’

One sign read: ‘There’s nothing wrong with you. There’s a lot wrong with the world you live in.’

Others took the opportunity to call attention to affirmative consent with a mnemonic device using the word ‘fries.’

‘I love consent,’ the sign read. ‘Freely given, Reversible, Informed, Enthusiastic, Specific.  

‘Never give up your identity,’ read another sign.

'Never give up your identity,' read another sign held by a person India

‘Never give up your identity,’ read another sign held by a person India

An Indian supporter of the LGBTI+ community holds a a rainbow flag as she takes part in a pride parade in Chennai on Sunday

An Indian supporter of the LGBTI+ community holds a a rainbow flag as she takes part in a pride parade in Chennai on Sunday

Turkey, which became the first Muslim-majority country to hold a Gay Pride parade in 2003, had a large turnout for its WorldPride event on Sunday, as well, though the demonstration was not sanctioned by the government.

Police were on the scene corralling participants which filled the streets in Istanbul before dispersing the crowd, ending the event with tear gas and rubber bullets on Sunday after their annual march was banned for the fifth consecutive year.

Though non-heterosexual sex has been legal in the country since its founding in 1923, members of the LGBTQI+ community have continued to face discrimination there.

The country does not recognize same-sex marriages, civil unions or domestic partnership benefits.

In Turkey, which became the first Muslim-majority country to hold a Gay Pride parade in 2003, had a large turnout for its WorldPride event on Sunday, as well

In Turkey, which became the first Muslim-majority country to hold a Gay Pride parade in 2003, had a large turnout for its WorldPride event on Sunday, as well

Police were on the scene corralling participants which filled the streets in Istanbul. They dispersed the event which was banned again this year for the fifth time

Police were on the scene corralling participants which filled the streets in Istanbul. They dispersed the event which was banned again this year for the fifth time

Though non-heterosexual sex has been legal in the country since its founding in 1923, members of the LGBTQI+ community have continued to face discrimination there. Participants in Istanbul's WorldPride parade are shown on Sunday

Though non-heterosexual sex has been legal in the country since its founding in 1923, members of the LGBTQI+ community have continued to face discrimination there. Participants in Istanbul’s WorldPride parade are shown on Sunday

The country does not recognize same-sex marriages, civil unions or domestic partnership benefits. Participants in Istanbul's WorldPride parade are shown on Sunday

The country does not recognize same-sex marriages, civil unions or domestic partnership benefits. Participants in Istanbul’s WorldPride parade are shown on Sunday

People celebrate on the street in central Istanbul, during a Pride event on Sunday, before it was dispersed by police

People celebrate on the street in central Istanbul, during a Pride event on Sunday, before it was dispersed by police

Back in New York City, among those gathered outside the Stonewall Inn hours before the marches on Sunday was lesbian activist Martha Shelly, one of the original marchers in New York’s first Gay Liberation parade in 1970.

Visitors from abroad who came to the US to march included Helen Gollin, a 63-year-old Australian, who helped found Sydney’s first Mardi Gras gay march in 1978.

‘It’s about honoring all that went on before us and all those who died in the name of freedom,’ Gollin said. 

Visitors from Amsterdam brought their A game dressed in beautiful drag in a white dress featuring butterflies as well as painted from head to toe like the Statue of Liberty with a unicorn wand in place of a torch, and wearing a short dress with vertical rainbow stripes.

Visitors from abroad who came to the US to march included Helen Gollin, a 63-year-old Australian, who helped found Sydney's first Mardi Gras gay march in 1978. Other participants from Australia are shown

Visitors from abroad who came to the US to march included Helen Gollin, a 63-year-old Australian, who helped found Sydney’s first Mardi Gras gay march in 1978. Other participants from Australia are shown

Visitors from Amsterdam brought their A game dressed in beautiful drag in a white dress featuring butterflies as well as painted from head to toe like the Statue of Liberty with a unicorn wand in place of a torch, and wearing a short dress with vertical rainbow stripes

Visitors from Amsterdam brought their A game dressed in beautiful drag in a white dress featuring butterflies as well as painted from head to toe like the Statue of Liberty with a unicorn wand in place of a torch, and wearing a short dress with vertical rainbow stripes

People from Denmark wearing 'Copenhagen 2021' tee shirts featuring a #YouAreIncluded hashtag also marched. They were photographed kissing with rainbow flags raised in the air

People from Denmark wearing ‘Copenhagen 2021’ tee shirts featuring a #YouAreIncluded hashtag also marched. They were photographed kissing with rainbow flags raised in the air

A person dressed in an outfit resembling the flag of France and wearing a harness that reads, 'Mr. Puppy France 2019' is shown during WorldPride activities in New York City on Sunday

A person dressed in an outfit resembling the flag of France and wearing a harness that reads, ‘Mr. Puppy France 2019’ is shown during WorldPride activities in New York City on Sunday

Two people dressed in harnesses and masks resembling the faces of dogs are shown during WorldPride in New York City on Sunday

Two people dressed in harnesses and masks resembling the faces of dogs are shown during WorldPride in New York City on Sunday

People from Denmark wearing ‘Copenhagen 2021’ tee shirts featuring a #YouAreIncluded hashtag marched in the parade and were photographed kissing with rainbow flags raised in the air. 

A person dressed in an outfit resembling the flag of France wore a harness that read, ‘Mr. Puppy France 2019.’

He was joined by two people dressed in harnesses and masks also resembling the faces of dogs.

Francesco Servalli, 38, who came from Italy with four friends to take part in the march, said: ‘It’s our history, it’s the reason why we can be whoever we want to be. That’s why it was important to come and celebrate.’

The official WorldPride parade concluded in the heart of Manhattan with performances by artists including Madonna, who is hugely popular in the gay community. Lesbian activist Martha Shelly, one of the original marchers in New York's first Gay Liberation parade in 1970 is shown gathered with others outside the Stonewall Inn during the 2019 WorldPride parade in honor of the 50th anniversary of the Stonewall riots on Sunday

The official WorldPride parade concluded in the heart of Manhattan with performances by artists including Madonna, who is hugely popular in the gay community. Lesbian activist Martha Shelly, one of the original marchers in New York’s first Gay Liberation parade in 1970 is shown gathered with others outside the Stonewall Inn during the 2019 WorldPride parade in honor of the 50th anniversary of the Stonewall riots on Sunday

New York's Gay Pride has long been a lure for tourists, drawing hundreds of thousands of people each year

New York’s Gay Pride has long been a lure for tourists, drawing hundreds of thousands of people each year

Servalli and others said Gay Pride is important for another reason: to muster strength to keep fighting for LGBTQI+ rights at a time when what they call extremist politicians, like Trump, or Italy’s Interior Minister Matteo Salvini and President Jair Bolsonaro in Brazil, have come to power.

‘I feel like we are going backward,’ Servalli said, citing in particular violence against transgender people.

‘But maybe it’s history. Sometimes you need to go backward to continue going further.’ 

‘Why We March’ statement from Reclaim Pride NYC 

‘We March in our communities’ tradition of resistance against police, state, and societal oppression, a tradition that is epitomized and symbolized by the 1969 Stonewall Rebellion.

‘We March against the exploitation of our communities for profit and against corporate and state pinkwashing, as displayed in Pride celebrations worldwide, including the NYC Pride Parade.

‘We March in opposition to transphobia, homophobia, biphobia, racism, sexism, xenophobia, bigotry based on religious affiliation, classism, ableism, audism, ageism, all other forms of oppression, and the violence that accompanies them in the U.S. and globally.

‘We March for an end to individual and institutional expressions of hate and violence as well as government policies that deny us our rights and our very lives, from the NYPD to ICE, from the prison industrial complex to state repression worldwide.

‘We March to oppose efforts that deny our communities’ rights and that brutally erase queer people worldwide.

‘We March against domestic and global neoliberalism and the ascendance of the far right, against poverty and economic inequality, against U.S. military aggression, and against the threat that is climate change.

‘We March to affirm that healthcare is a right, including treatment for all people with HIV/AIDS worldwide and intensive prevention efforts, and to demand an end to HIV stigma and criminalization.

‘We are trans, bisexual, lesbian, gay, queer, intersex, asexual, two-spirit, non-binary, gender non-conforming + and allies.

‘We March to celebrate our communities and history, in solidarity with other oppressed groups, and to demand social and economic justice worldwide—we March for Liberation!’

Source: Reclaim Pride Coalition – New York City 

Over the years Gay Pride has become a huge money maker, so much so that this year some LGBT rights activists are holding a separate march they consider purer

Over the years Gay Pride has become a huge money maker, so much so that this year some LGBT rights activists are holding a separate march they consider purer

The alternative march, called the 'Queer Liberation March,' was also held on Sunday and was put on by the Reclaim Pride Coalition

The alternative march, called the ‘Queer Liberation March,’ was also held on Sunday and was put on by the Reclaim Pride Coalition 

'We March against the exploitation of our communities for profit and against corporate and state pinkwashing, as displayed in Pride celebrations worldwide, including the NYC Pride Parade,' a representative for the group said in a statement on the organization's website. A person is shown holding a sign that reads, 'my trans pride is not 4 business or marketing' at the Queer Liberation March on Sunday

‘We March against the exploitation of our communities for profit and against corporate and state pinkwashing, as displayed in Pride celebrations worldwide, including the NYC Pride Parade,’ a representative for the group said in a statement on the organization’s website. A person is shown holding a sign that reads, ‘my trans pride is not 4 business or marketing’ at the Queer Liberation March on Sunday

'The annual Pride parade has become a bloated, over-policed circuit party. Pride is not for sale. It's gone completely off tracks,' Dobbs said. A person with a painted face is shown participating in the Queer Liberation March on Sunday

‘The annual Pride parade has become a bloated, over-policed circuit party. Pride is not for sale. It’s gone completely off tracks,’ Bill Dobbs, an organizer of the rival march, said. A person with a painted face is shown participating in the Queer Liberation March on Sunday

The idea may be to keep fighting, but over the years Gay Pride has become a huge money maker, which is another factor that prompted the Queer Liberation March  to hold its own event on Sunday.

‘We March against the exploitation of our communities for profit and against corporate and state pinkwashing, as displayed in Pride celebrations worldwide, including the NYC Pride Parade,’ a representative for the group said in a statement on the organization’s website. 

‘The annual Pride parade has become a bloated, over-policed circuit party. Pride is not for sale. It’s gone completely off tracks,’ Bill Dobbs, an organizer of the rival march, said. 

He described the latter as ‘an effort to keep with the spirit of Stonewall.’ 

Nigerian activist Michael Ighodaro speaks during a meeting of the Reclaim Pride Coalition at the Church of the Village in New York

Nigerian activist Michael Ighodaro speaks during a meeting of the Reclaim Pride Coalition at the Church of the Village in New York

A person holds a sign that reads 'stop caging kids' with the Nazi swastiska crossed out during the Queer Liberation March on Sunday

A person holds a sign that reads ‘stop caging kids’ with the Nazi swastiska crossed out during the Queer Liberation March on Sunday

Tensions between trans women and gay men boil over at the Stonewall Inn on Saturday during WorldPride events following the 50th anniversary of riots in 1969

Reporting by Reuters 

A black transgender woman wanted to be heard, but the white men wanted to celebrate.

The scene at New York City’s Stonewall Inn on Saturday, as reported by multiple witnesses on social media, showed how long-simmering tensions between transgender women of color and white gay men have boiled over during the celebration of World Pride and the 50th anniversary of the Stonewall uprising.

The unidentified woman wanted to address the crowd inside the Greenwich Village gay bar where patrons fought back against police harassment 50 years ago, birthing the LGBTQ movement. She arrived unannounced and disrupted a drag show, drawing an unfriendly response at first. The crowd eventually warmed and she was given the microphone and spoke for 12 minutes.

‘She read the names of the black trans women who died. Facts about them. Their obituaries. She called on everyone in the bar to help. I would like to say the audience was respectful, but there was quite a bit of chatter and a few jeers,’ witness Aspen Eberhardt, finance manager of the gay rights group PFLAG, wrote on Twitter.

For many gay men, this weekend’s celebration is about finally being able to live their true lives, unafraid to declare who they love and being grateful for achieving virtual equality, at least in places like Greenwich Village, where the rebellion began.

But many transgender women of color, representing the T in the LGBTQ community, have seized the moment to air their grievances, such as suffering from higher levels of unemployment and homelessness as their cisgender gay and lesbian brethren.

‘If pride month is the only time you talk about these issues, that’s probably a sign you should look into just how privileged you are,’ said Darya Shirvani, 19, a white Los Angeles college student.

Moreover, trans women are often the target of violence. Some 65 transgender people, nearly all trans women of color, have been murdered in the United States since 2017, according to Human Rights Watch.

‘The trans community has not made the same progress as the cis gay community has. And I think it’s important to call attention to that especially because pride was started by trans people. We’ve been largely abandoned by the gay rights movement,’ said Calamity Alexis, 19, a preschool teacher living in Brooklyn who uses both he and she pronouns.

Certainly many gay white men are active in promoting transgender rights, recognizing that transgender women of color in particular suffer from discrimination in ways they did 50 years ago. Mainstream gay rights groups often make a point of standing up for trans women.

‘Growing up as a gay man in Texas, I found strength in that the rest of the community was there for me. And now, with where we are now, it’s my responsibility to be there for the rest of the community,’ said Brett Donaldson, 28, a white gay man from New York.

But there is still lingering resentment born out of the movement’s origins. Two early pioneers of the Stonewall movement from the beginning in 1969 were transgender women of color, Marsha P. Johnson and Sylvia Rivera. But within four years, ‘drag queens,’ as they were called then, were banned from the annual gay pride parade that Johnson and Rivera helped launch.

At the Trans Day of Action, a rally in New York’s Washington Square Park on Friday, people shouted: ‘Who started this fight?’

The crowd responded: ‘Trans women of color.’

Qweenb. Amor, 30, a nursing student from New Orleans and a trans Latina, said her activism on this topic was ‘an act of survival.’

‘Gay men, they can assimilate. The rest of us don’t have the right or the privilege to blend in. We can’t blend in,’ Amor said. ‘This is what it is and we need full force from the community to stand behind us.’ 

The world parties with Pride: Cities across the globe burst with rainbow colors as millions celebrate LGBTQI+

ByJack Newman For Mailonline 

People around the world have taken to the streets today adorned in rainbow colors and glitter to celebrate the annual Gay Pride Parade.

From Mexico City to North Macedonia, millions of members of the LGBT community and allies took part in the march.

This year is particularly significant as it marks 50 years since the Stonewall Riots which began on June 28, 1969.

The demonstrations at the Stonewall Inn in New York City are considered to be one of the most defining moments in the gay rights movement.

The following year, New York City held its first ever Pride march to protest ongoing discrimination againtst the LGBTQI+ community. The movement spread across the US in a show of their solidarity which has continued every year since.

The marches usually take place around the last weekend in June and this year has seen celebrations take place in cities across the world.

In Paris, revelers had to contend with soaring temperatures before a friendly firefighter sprayed a hose over the crowd.

Photographs from WorldPride events around the globe are including here, including the first ever event of its kind in Macedonia. 

Around the world, millions of people have been participating in Gay Pride marches this weekend such as this loving couple in Barcelona

Around the world, millions of people have been participating in Gay Pride marches this weekend such as this loving couple in Barcelona

In Milan, a reveller holds a placard which says, 'I won't apologise for who I am' as she joins millions around the world in marching to show support for the LGBTQI+ community

In Milan, a reveller holds a placard which says, ‘I won’t apologise for who I am’ as she joins millions around the world in marching to show support for the LGBTQI+ community

Many of the participants at Pride brought rainbow flags but these two in Barcelona took it a step further by painting themselves from head to toe

Many of the participants at Pride brought rainbow flags but these two in Barcelona took it a step further by painting themselves from head to toe

In Paris, the 5.5-kilometre march starts at Tour Montparnasse and passes the Notre Dame en route to the Bastille

In Paris, the 5.5-kilometre march starts at Tour Montparnasse and passes the Notre Dame en route to the Bastille

In Gijon, Spain, hundreds took part in the march today which saw a man in leather in a cell partying at the front

In Gijon, Spain, hundreds took part in the march today which saw a man in leather in a cell partying at the front

A couple kiss at a Pride march in Barcelona on a day where millions around the world celebrated their sexuality

A couple kiss at a Pride march in Barcelona on a day where millions around the world celebrated their sexuality

In Paris, a woman poses with a group of five men as they had to contend with the searing heat in leather clothing as the European heatwave continued

In Paris, a woman poses with a group of five men as they had to contend with the searing heat in leather clothing as the European heatwave continued

This year marks 50 years since the Stonewall Riots in New York City which sparked the Pride movement and the fight for gay liberation

This year marks 50 years since the Stonewall Riots in New York City which sparked the Pride movement and the fight for gay liberation

Many took the opportunity to wear fabulous fancy dress such as this artful participant who covered his body in glitter in Spain

Many took the opportunity to wear fabulous fancy dress such as this artful participant who covered his body in glitter in Spain

In New Hampshire, Democratic primary presidential candidate Bernie Sanders joined the Nashua Pride march while many criticized Donald Trump

In New Hampshire, Democratic primary presidential candidate Bernie Sanders joined the Nashua Pride march while many criticized Donald Trump

In Lisbon, thousands lined the streets under a massive rainbow flag at the annual event which takes place on the final weekend of June

In Lisbon, thousands lined the streets under a massive rainbow flag at the annual event which takes place on the final weekend of June

In Barcelona, a participant in the march wore a fetching Versace dress on the day which celebrates individuality and diversity

In Barcelona, a participant in the march wore a fetching Versace dress on the day which celebrates individuality and diversity

Many revelers wore fancy dress but this pair took it to the next level with their botanical themed enembles

Many revelers wore fancy dress but this pair took it to the next level with their botanical themed enembles

A participant in Barcelona holds a placard which reads, 'Missing Obama' in reference to Donald Trump's White House

A participant in Barcelona holds a placard which reads, ‘Missing Obama’ in reference to Donald Trump’s White House

A rainbow umbrella lies near placards for a Pride parade in Kathmandu, Nepal, which translate terms for people within the LGBTQI+ community

A rainbow umbrella lies near placards for a Pride parade in Kathmandu, Nepal, which translate terms for people within the LGBTQI+ community

In the Philippines, a reveler at a march covered half of their face with makeup and a wig and rainbow-colored eye shadow for a stunning effect

In the Philippines, a reveler at a march covered half of their face with makeup and a wig and rainbow-colored eye shadow for a stunning effect

North Macedonia held its first ever Gay Pride today, and a participant here is seen blowing a whistle at the 'Skopje Pride'

North Macedonia held its first ever Gay Pride today, and a participant here is seen blowing a whistle at the ‘Skopje Pride’

In North Macedonia, the first ever Pride March saw anti-protests organised by the Orthodox Christian Priest and NGOs

In North Macedonia, the first ever Pride March saw anti-protests organised by the Orthodox Christian Priest and NGOs

Read more at DailyMail.co.uk


Comments are closed.