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Nicola Sturgeon taunts Boris Johnson over Scots independence vote saying he is SCARED of losing

Nicola Sturgeon taunts Boris Johnson over a new Scottish independence referendum saying he will not allow it to take place because he is SCARED of losing

  • First Minister said PM’s decision to block a new vote was ‘a sign of weakness’ 
  • Used Edinburgh speech to encourage nationalists not to waver in their support
  • Shock poll showed Scots back independence for the first time since 2015 

Nicola Sturgeon goaded Boris Johnson today over his refusal to grant a new referendum on Scottish independence, claiming he was scared of losing it.

The First Minister said that the Prime Minister’s decision to block a new vote was ‘a sign of weakness’ as she continued to build her case the break up the UK.

The SNP leader used a speech in Edinburgh to encourage fellow nationalists not to waver in their support – after a shock poll yesterday showed Scots would vote to break up the UK. 

Lashing out at the Conservative Government she said: ‘If they had any confidence in the argument for the Westminster union, they would have no problem with the people of Scotland having the right to choose.

‘It is the fear of defeat that is making them so desperate to deny us the choice.

‘We should draw encouragement from that.’

The First Minister said that the Prime Minister’s decision to block a new vote was ‘a sign of weakness’ as she continued to build her case the break up the UK

YouGov research found 51 per cent north of the border would support independence - the first time the firm has recorded a majority in favour since 2015

YouGov research found 51 per cent north of the border would support independence – the first time the firm has recorded a majority in favour since 2015

But the PM has flatly dismissed the idea, insisting the 2014 ballot - which the separatists lost convincingly - was a once-in-a-generation decision

But the PM has flatly dismissed the idea, insisting the 2014 ballot – which the separatists lost convincingly – was a once-in-a-generation decision

YouGov research found 51 per cent north of the border would support independence – the first time the firm has recorded a majority in favour since 2015.

The figures – which were hailed by the SNP as evidence momentum is on their side – emerged as Nicola Sturgeon and Boris Johnson do battle over whether to hold another national vote. 

The First Minister has demanded one immediately saying circumstances have been changed by Brexit.

But the PM has flatly dismissed the idea, insisting the 2014 ballot – which the separatists lost convincingly – was a once-in-a-generation decision. 

Ms Sturgeon today urged those in the independence movement to ‘stay the course’.

She said: ‘We must not let the Tories turn a positive, persuasive and invigorating discussion about the best future for our country into an arid and bitter argument about process and procedure.’

Pressure on the union has been mounting since Scots voted to stay in the European Union in 2016.

Last month’s general election saw the SNP, whose campaign focused on halting Brexit and giving Scots a choice on their future, increase their seats at Westminster.

The Scottish Conservatives, whose election campaign urged voters to reject SNP calls for indyref2, lost seats.

The Scottish Parliament this week voted in favour of a second independence referendum. 

The First Minister today did not rule out testing the possibility of a consultative referendum in court if the UK Government continues to deny requests for another poll.

The First Minister today did not rule out testing the possibility of a consultative referendum in court if the UK Government continues to deny requests for another poll

The First Minister today did not rule out testing the possibility of a consultative referendum in court if the UK Government continues to deny requests for another poll

While she admitted there was legal ambiguity around the powers of the Scottish Parliament to hold a non-binding vote, she said: ‘That means it cannot be said definitively that it would not be legal, but equally it cannot be described as being beyond legal doubt.

‘If a proposal for a referendum on that basis was brought forward, it would be challenged in court.

‘If a court ruled that it was legal, it wouldn’t be a ‘wildcat referendum’ as our opponents like to brand it – it would be within the remit of the Scottish Parliament.

‘Now, should the UK Government continue to deny Scotland’s right to choose, we may reach the point where it is necessary for this issue to be tested.

‘I am not ruling that out.’

 

Read more at DailyMail.co.uk


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